Memory Effects: The Holocaust and the Art of Secondary Witnessing

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Rutgers University Press, 2002 - Art - 241 pages
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Dora Apel analyzes the ways in which artists born after the Holocaust-whom she calls secondary witnesses-represent a history they did not experience first hand. She demonstrates that contemporary artists confront these atrocities in order to bear witness not to the Holocaust directly, but to its "memory effects" and to the implications of those effects for the present and future.

Drawing on projects that employ a variety of unorthodox artistic strategies, the author provides a unique understanding of contemporary representations of the Holocaust. She demonstrates how these artists frame the past within the conditions of the present, the subversive use of documentary and the archive, the effects of the Jewish genocide on issues of difference and identity, and the use of representation as a form of resistance to historical closure.

  

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Contents

CHAPTER
9
CHAPTER
43
CHAPTER THREE
72
CHAPTER FOUR
92
CHAPTER FIVE
108
CHAPTER
154
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About the author (2002)

Dora Apel is Associate Professor and W. Hawkins Ferry Chair in Modern and Contemporary Art at Wayne State University. She is the author of "Memory Effects: The Holocaust and the Art of Secondary Witnessing" (2002) and "Imagery of Lynching: Black Men, White Women, and the Mob" (2004). Shawn Michelle Smith is Associate Professor of Visual and Critical Studies at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. She is the author of "American Archives: Gender, Race, and Class in Visual Culture "(1999) and "Photography on the Color Line: W.E.B. DuBois, Race, and Visual Culture "(2004).

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