In the Name of Identity: Violence and the Need to Belong

Přední strana obálky
Arcade Publishing, 2001 - Počet stran: 164
Identity - what makes each of us unique - has been a fundamental question of philosophers from Socrates to Freud. Identity is the crucible out of which we come: our background, our race, our gender, our tribal affiliations, our religion (or lack thereof), all go into making up who we are. All too often, however, the notion of identity - personal, religious, ethnic, or national - has given rise to heated passions and even massive crimes.
"I want to try and understand why so many people commit crimes in the name of identity," writes Amin Maalouf. Moving across the world's history, faiths, and politics, he argues against an oversimplified and hostile concept of identity. Cogently and persuasively he examines identity in the context of the modern world, where it can be viewed as both glory and poison. He demonstrates, too, the dangers of using identity as a protective - and therefore aggressive - mechanism, which frequently leads to the repression or extermination of minorities, heretics, or class enemies.
Maalouf contends that many of us would reject our inherited conceptions of identity, to which we cling through habit, if only we examined them more closely. The future of society depends on accepting all identities, while recognizing our uniqueness.
 

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IN THE NAME OF IDENTITY: Violence and the Need to Belong

Recenze od uživatele  - Kirkus

The latest attempt to explain the propensity of civilized nations to repeatedly engage in the massacre of their neighbors, a practice alternately known as genocide, race riots, ethnic cleansing, and ... Přečíst celou recenzi

LibraryThing Review

Recenze od uživatele  - joeltallman - LibraryThing

A slowly, surely built essay on one of the most important issues of our time: the way identity has given rise to the kinds of violence that lead to war and division. This prescient pre-September 11th book deserves a wide audience. Přečíst celou recenzi

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O autorovi (2001)

Barbara Bray (née Jacobs) was born on November 24, 1924 in Paddington, London. She died on February 25, 2010. Bray was an English translator and critic. She translated the correspondence of Gustave Flaubert, and work by leading French speaking writers of her own time including Marguerite Duras, Amin Maalouf, Julia Kristeva, Michel Quint, Jean Anouilh, Michel Tournier, Jean Genet, Alain Bosquet, Réjean Ducharme and Philippe Sollers. She received the PEN Translation Prize in 1986. She had a personal and professional relationship with the married Samuel Beckett that continued for the rest of his life, and Bray was one of the few people with whom he discussed his work. Bray suffered a stroke at the end of 2003, but despite this disability she continued to write Beckett's memoirs, Let Mortals Rejoice..., which she could not complete. Bray recorded some of her reflections about Beckett in a series of conversations with her friend, Marek Kedzierski, from 2004 to 2009. Excerpts have been published in many languages, but not English as of yet.

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