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SAMUELSON'S FRONT TOOTH. By EDEN PHILPOTTS

(Illustrations by JOSEPH SKELTON.)
SELFISH. By ALAN WRIGHT

608
SEPTEMBER. BY MAX COWPER

237
SERENADE. Translated by NADINE YARINTZOFF

129
SHREWSBURY. By STANLEY J. WEYMAN

61, 207, 382, 541, 609, 715
(Illustrations by CLAUDE A. SHEPPERSON.)
SIME, S. H., INTERVIEW WITH. By A. H. LAWRENCE

755
SIMS, G. R., INTERVIEW WITH. By A. H. LAWRENCE ...

682
SINEW AND SENTIMENT. By F. MILLER

199, 463
(Illustrated from Prints in the British MUSEUM COLLECTION.)
SOLITUDE. By E. T. EDWARDES ...

313
SONG, THE. By Martin STAINFORTH

80
SOUL'S PASSING, THE. By Angus EVAN ABBOTT

495
SPORT. By BENNETT COLL

(Illustrations by JOSEPH SKELTON.)
STORIES OF THE STONE AGE. By H. G. Wells ...

4, 430
(Illustrations by Cosmo ROWE.)
STORY OF THE WAGGONER, THE. By Neil Wynx Williams

32
(Illustrations by A. S. FORREST.)
THE YOUNG YEAR. By Scott RANKIN

706
“THOU SHALT NOT MAKE TO THYSELF ANY GRAVEN IMAGE.'

By EMME
A. KEDDELL

471
(Illustrations by Geo. HUTCHINSON.)
TREATMENT OF OSCAR MERLYN, TIIE. By A. J. DAWSON

354
(Illustrations by FRANCES EWAN.)
TRIOLET

470
TURKISH WEDDINGS. By LAURA B. STARR

296
(Illustrated from PHOTOGRAPHS.)
ULTIMATE DIM THULE, FROM AN. By S. H. SIME

1°3, 279
VEILED MAN, TIIE. By William LE QUEUX ...

16, 318, 477, 744
(Illustrations by WARWICK GOBLE.)
VILLAGE WEDDING, A.' By Stephen Reid

797
VILLIERS, MR. FREDERICK. By Roy COMPTON

239
(Illustrations from VARIOUS SOURCES.)
WANDERINGS IN BOOKLAND. By PERCY Cross STANDING. 124, 261, 411, 491,637, 831
WANTED. By Fred WHISHAW

597
(Illustrations by Geo. Hutchinson.)
WAR CARTOONS
WAR PICTURES

187, 453
WAY OUT, THE. By FRANCIS GRIBBLE...

(Illustrations by A. CAMPBELL Cross.)
WOMAN'S LOGIC, A. By JEROME K. JEROME...

415
WHY? By P. C. S.

502
WILL O'THE WISP. By P. C. STANDING

142
WITII THE BEST INTENTIONS. By F. GILLETT

363
WHEN THE DOOR OPENED. By SARAH GRANT)

708
(Illustrations by SYDNEY COWELL.)
WYLLIE, A.R.A., A DAY WITHI W. L. By Roy COMPTON...

106
(Illustrations from VARIOUS SOURCES.)
YACHTING AND YACHT RACING. By Clive HOLLAND ...

13
(Illustrated from PHOTOGRAPHS.)
YOUR LOVE AND MINE. By SWANHILDE BULAU

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FROM THE PAINTING BY D. MAILLART IN THE PARIS SALON.

STORIES OF THE STONE AGE.

BY H. G. WELLS.

ILLUSTRATED BY COSMO ROWE.

IV.—THE REIGN OF UYA THE LION.

HE old lion was in stumpy teeth, but very silent and very

luck. The tribe had cool; he knew of fires before ; these were a certain pride in not the first of mankind that had ministheir ruler, but that tered to his old age. The third night he was all the satisfac- came between the outer fire and the inner, tion they got out of and he leapt the flint heap, and pulled it. He came the very

down Irm the son of Irk, who had seemed night that Ugh-lomi like to be the leader. That was a dreadkilled Uya the Cunning, and so it was ful night, because they lit great flares of they named him Uya. It was the old fern and ran screaming, and the lion woman, the fire-minder, who first named missed his hold of Irm. By the glare of him Uya. A shower had lowered the the fire they saw Irm struggle up, and fires to a glow, and made the night dark. run a little way towards them, and then And as they conversed together, and the lion in two bounds had him down peered at one another in the darkness, . again. That was the last of Irm. and wondered fearfully what Uya would So fear came, and all the delight do to them in their dreams now that he of spring passed out of their lives. Alwas dead, they heard the mounting re- ready there were five gone out of the verberations of the lion's roar close at tribe, and four nights added three more hand. Then everything was still.

to the number. Food-seeking became They held their breath, so that almost spiritless, none knew who might go next, the only sounds were the patter of the and all day the women toiled, even rain and the hiss of the raindrops in the the favourite women, gathering litter and ashes. And then, after an interminable sticks for the night fires. And the huntime, a crash, and a shriek of fear, and a ters hunted ill : in the warm spring-time growling. They sprang to their feet, hunger came again as though it was still shouting, screaming, running this way winter. The tribe might have moved, and that, but brands would not burn, and had they had a leader, but they had no in a minute the victim was being dragged leader, and none knew where to go that away through the ferns. It was Irk, the the lion could not follow them. So the brother of Wau. So the lion came. old lion waxed fat and thanked heaven

The ferns were still wet from the rain for the race of men. Two of the children the next night, and he came and took and a youth died while the moon was still Click with the red hair. That sufficed new, and then it was the shrivelled old for two nights. And then in the dark fire-minder first lethought herself in a between the moons he came three nights, dream of Eudena and Ugh-lomi, and of night after night, and that though they the way Uya had been slain. She had had good fires. He was an old lion with lived in fear of Uya all her days, and now she lived in fear of the lion. That Ugh- hau, who now chipped Aints, and One lomi could kill Uya for good-Ugh-lomi Eye, and Bo, and the snail-eater, the two whom she had seen born-was impossible. red-haired men, and Cat’s-skin and Snake, It was Uya still seeking his enemy! all the men that were left alive of the Sons

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And then came the strange return of of Uya, taking their ash spears and their Ugh-lomi, a wonderful animal seen gal- smiting-stones, and with throwing stones loping far across the river, that suddenly in the beast-paw bags, started forth upon changed into two animals, a horse and a the trail of Ugh-lomi through the hawthorn man. Following this portent, the vision thickets where Yaaa the Rhinoceros and of Ugh-lomi on the farther bank of the his brothers were feeding, and up the bare river.

Yes, it was all plain to downland towards the beechwoods. her. Uya was punishing them, because That night the fires burnt high and they had not hunted down Ugh-lomi and fierce, as the waxing moon set, and the Eudena.

lion left the crouching women and childThe men came straggling back to the ren in peace. chances of the night while the sun was And the next day, while the sun was still still golden in the sky. They were re- high, the hunters returned-all save One ceived with the story of Ugh-lomi. She Eye, who lay dead with a smashed skull went across the river with them and at the foot of the ledge. (When Ugh-lomi showed them his spoor hesitating on the came back that evening from stalking the farther bank. Siss the Tracker knew the horses, he found the vultures already busy feet for Ugh-lomi's. “Uya needs Ugh- over him.) And with them the hunters lomi," cried the old woman, standing on brought Eudena bruised and wounded, the left of the bend, a gesticulating figure but alive. That had been the strange of flaring bronze in the sunset. Her cries order of the shrivelled old woman, that were strange sounds, fitting to and fro on she was to be brought alive—“She is no the borderland of speech, but this was kill for us. She is for Uya the Lion." the sense they carried : “ The lion needs Her hands were tied with thongs, as Eudena. He comes night after night though she had been a man, and she came seeking Eudena and Ugh-lomi. When weary and drooping—her hair over her he cannot find Eudena and Ugh-lomi, he eyes and matted with blood. They walked grows angry and he kills. Hunt Eudena about her, and ever and again the Snailand Ugh-lomi, Eudena whom he pursued, Eater, whose name she had given, would and Ugh-lomi for whom he gave the death laugh and strike her with his ashen spear. word! Hunt Eudena and Ugh-lomi!” And after he had struck her with his

She turned to the distant reed-bed, as spear, he would look over his shoulder sometimes she had turned to Uya in his like one who had done an over-bold deed. life. “Is it not so, my lord ?" she cried. The others, too, looked over their shouldAnd, as if in answer, the tall reeds bowed ers ever and again, and all were in a hurry before a breath of wind.

save Eudena.

When the old woman Far into the twilight the sound of saw them coming, she cried aloud with hacking was heard from the squatting joy. places. It was the men sharpening their They made Eudena cross the river with ashen spears against the hunting of the her hands tied, although the current was morrow. And in the night, early before strong, and when she slipped the old the moon rose, the lion came and took woman screamed, first with joy and then the girl of Siss the Tracker.

for fear she might be drowned. And when In the morning before the sun had they had dragged Eudena to shore, she risen, Siss the Tracker, and the lad Wau- could not stand for a time, albeit they beat

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