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S. 949. An act granting a pension to Mrs. Lydia W. Ford.
S. 941. An act granting a pension to Benjamin C. Stone.

S. 910. An act granting a pension to the children of Martin N. Slocum, deceased.

S. 906. An act granting a pension to Elizabeth Clarke.
S. 904. An act granting a pension to Benjamin T. Raines, of Indiana.

S. 903. An act granting a pension to Horace Peck, of Charlton, Mas." sachusetts.

S. 605. An act respecting the organization of militia in the State of North Carolina, South Carolina, Florida, Alabama, Louisiana, and Arkansas.

S. 942. An act granting a pension to Sarah E. Haines.

S. 219. Joint resolution giving the assent of the United States to the construction of the Newport and Cincimati bridge.

S. 217. Joint resolution for printing tlte medical and surgical history of the rebellion.

S. 231. Joint resolution providing for the reporting and publication of the debates in Congress.

S. 200. Joint resolution reappointing Louis Agassiz a regent of the Smithsonian Institute.

S. 238. Joint resolution extending the time for the completion of the first twenty miles of the Cairo and Fulton railroad.

S. 195. Joint resolution requiring the Commissioner of the General Land Office to transfer certain money.

S. 239. Joint resolution more efficiently to protect the fur seal in Alaska.

S. 896. An act confirming certain purchases of land in the Ionia district, Michigan, made by Charles H. Rodd and Andrew J. Campeau.

S. 860. An act for the relief of Wright Duryea.

S. 871. An act to authorize the transfer of lands granted to the Union Pacific Railway Company, eastern division, between Denver and the point of its connection with the Union Pacific railroad, to the Denver Pacific Railroad and Telegraph Company, and to expedite the completion of railroads to Denver, in the Territory of Colorado.

S. 729. An act to provide for the execution in the District of Columbia of commissions issued by the courts of the States and Territories of the United States or of foreign nations, and for taking depositions to be issued in such cases.

S. 679. An act to amend an act entitled “An act granting lands to the State of Oregon to aid in the construction of a wagon road from Eugene City to the eastern boundary of said State."

S. 862. An act amendatory of the act providing for the sale of the arsenal grounds at St. Louis and Liberty, Missouri, and for other purposes, approved July 25, 1868.

A message was received from the President of the United States by Mr. Moore, his private secretary, notifying the House that he did this day approve and sign bills and joint resolutions of the following titles, viz:

H. R. 2006. An act to establish certain post roads.

H. R. 1808. An act making appropriations for the service of the Post Office Department during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1870.

H. R. 1803. An act making appropriations for the support of the army for the year ending June 30, 1870, and for other purposes.

H. R. 1881. An act regulating the reports of national banking associations.

H. R. 1911. An act making appropriations to supply deficiencies in

the appropriations for the service of the government for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1869, and for other purposes.

H. R. 1672. An act making appropriations for the legislative, executive, and judicial expenses of the government for the year ending the 30th of June, 1870.

H. R. 2007. An act making appropriations for sundry civil expenses ‘of the government for the year ending June 30, 1870, and for other purposes.

H. R. 425. An act for the relief of Mary A. Filler.

H. R. 1867. An act for the relief of the Illinois Iron and Bolt Company.

H. R. 2009. An act to authorize the Secretary of War to place at the disposal of the National Lincoln Monument Association, at Springfield, Illinois, damaged and captured ordnance.

H. R. 1279. An act in relation to additional bounties, and for other purposes.

H. R. 1758. An act to incorporate the Masonic Mutual Relief Association, of the District of Columbia.

H. R. 1063. An act for the relief of Henry Barricklow.

H. R. 1973. An act in reference to certifying checks by national banks.

H. R. 1879. An act for the relief of certain companies of scouts and guides organized in Alabama.

H. R. 1314. An act to confirm certain private land claims in the Terri. tory of New Mexico.

H. R. 1830. An act granting a pension to Madge K. Guthrie and Robert B. Guthrie.

H. R. 1928. An act granting a pension to Lemuel Bartholow.

H. R. 1041. An act granting the right of way to the Walla-Walla and Columbia River Railroad Company, and for other purposes.

H. R. 1804. 'An act to establish a bridge across the East river between the cities of Brooklyn and New York, in the State of New York, a post road.

H. R. 568. An act explanatory of the act entitled “An act declaring the title to land warrants in certain cases."

H. R. 1989. An act for the relief of Peter McGough, collector of internal revenue and disbursing agent twentieth district, Pennsylvania.

H. R. 1570. An act making appropriations for the consular and diplomatic expenses of the government for the year ending June 30, 1870.

H. R. 112. An act relating to captures made by Admiral Farragut's fleet in the Mississippi river, in May, 1862.

H. R. 1327. An act to amend an act entitled "An act to exempt cer. tain manufactures from internal tax, and for other purposes," approved March 31, 1868.

H. R. 1877. An act for the relief of the heirs and legal representatives of Charles C. Cook, deceased.

H. R. 1204. An act to confirm certain land claims in the State of Missouri.

H. R. 596. An act granting a pension to Mary A. Davis, widow of William E. Davis, a private of the 18th regiment of Indiana volunteers, in the war of 1861.

H. R. 468. Joint resolution authorizing the Union Pacific railway, eastern division, to change its name to the Kansas Pacific Railway Company.

H. R. 466. Joint resolution donating condemned cannon and muskets to the McPherson monument.

Austin Blair

Roderick R. Butler

Reuder W Clarke

H. R. 211. Joint resolution for the relief of Henry S. Gibbons.

H. R. 438. Joint resolution relative to certain purchases by the Interior Department.

H. R. 280. Joint resolution for the relief of Mrs. Ella E. Hobart.

H. R. 327. Joint resolution authorizing the Secretary of the Treasury to remit the duty on certain meridian circles.

The question then recurring on the third reading of the bill of the Senate (S. 845) for the relief of Abbott Q. Ross,

Ordered, That it be read a third time.
It was accordingly read the third time.
The question then recurred on its passage.
The yeas and nays having been ordered thereon,

Those who voted in the affirmative are-
Mr. Nathaniel P. Banks Mr. Henry P. H. Bromwell Mr. Samuel F. Cary Mr. Oliver J. Dickey

Ignatius Donnelly Benjamin M. Boyer Henry L. Cake

Simeon Corley

Benjainin Eggleston.
Those who voted in the negative are-
Mr. Nathaniel Boyden

Mr. Shelby M. Cullom
Sidney Clarke

Oliver H. Dockery.
Jacob Benton
The roll-call was commenced, but before completing the same,
The Speaker, at 12 o'clock m., addressed the House as follows, viz:

Gentlemen of the House of Representatives, I shall not attempt to add anything to the expressive remarks addressed to you by my predecessor on leaving the chair a few hours since. The fortieth Congress has now expired by limitation of law. Our public acts will be preserved on parchment. Our personal relations, our sympathies, our kindnesses, all the ties that bind us to each other, will forever live as part of our: selves. I now pronounce the fortieth Congress of the United States of America adjourned without day.

Mr. Jehu Baker

John D. Baldwin
Fernando C. Beaman

John M. Broomall

Mr. Amasa Cobb

Burton C. Cook
Thomas Cornell

Columbis Delano

APPENDIX.

STANDING RULES AND ORDERS

FOR CONDUCTING BUSINESS IN

THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES OF THE UNITED STATES

At the close of the 3d session of the 40th Congress.

TOUCHING THE DUTY OF THE SPEAKER.

1. He shall take the chair every day precisely at the hour to which the House shall have adjourned on the preceding day; shall immediately call the members to order; and, on the appearance of a quorum, shall cause the journal of the preceding day to be read.- April 7, 1789.

2. He shall preserve order and decorum; may speak to points of order in preference to other members, rising from his seat for that purpose; and shall decide questions of order, subject to an appeal to the House by any two members April 7, 1789; on which appeal no member shall speak more than once, unless by leave of the House.- December 23, 1811.

3. He shall rise to put a question, but may state it sitting:- April 7, 1789.

4. Questions shall be distinctly put in this form, to wit: “As many as are of opinion that (as the question may be) say Ay;” and after the affirmative voice is expressed, “ As many as are of the contrary opinion say No." If the Speaker doubt, or a division be called for, the House shall decide; those in the affirmative of the question shall first rise from their seats, and afterwards those in the negative. If the Speaker still doubt, or a count be required by at least one-fifth of a quorum of the members, the Speaker shall name two members, one from each side, to tell the members in the affirmative and negative; which being reported, he shall rise and state the decision to the House.—March 16, 1860.

5. The Speaker shall examine and correct the journal before it is read. He shall have a general direction of the hall, and the unappropriated rooms in that part of the Capitol assigned to the House shall be subject to his order and disposal, until the further order of the House. ' He shall have a right to name any member to perform the duties of the Chair, but such substitution shall not extend beyond an adjournment.--December 23, 1811, and May 26, 1824.

6. No person shall be permitted to perform divine service in the cham.. ber occupied by the House of Representatives, unless with the consent of the Speaker.-May 19, 1804.

7. In all cases of ballot by the House the Speaker shall vote; in other cases he shall not be required to vote, unless the House be equally divided, or unless his vote, if given to the minority, will make the divi. sion equal; and in case of such equal division the question shall be lost.-April 7, 1789.

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