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PRICES of STOCKS, from JANUARY 28 to FEBRUARY 25, 1792, both inclulive.

By ANTHONY CLARKE, Stock-Broker, No. 13, Sweeting's-Alley, Cornhill. 4 per C.

Long Short India India India South Sea Old reduced. confols. confols. confols. Ans. Ans. Stock.

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In the j per Cent. consols. the highest and lowest Price of each Day is given;. in every other Article the highest Price only, the Long and Short Annuities excepted, which are given within a fixteenth of the highelt Price. In tlic différent Funds that are shut, the Prices are given with the Dividend till the Days of Opening

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The UNIVERSAL MAGAZINE for MARCH, 1792. 161

Memoirs of the Life of Ralph THOR E S BY, F. R. §.

With a fine Portrait of that celebrated Antiquary. RALPH THORESBY, an eminent lected a carious cabinet of them) whớ

antiquary, was born at Leeds, treated him very affectionately, and in Yorkfire, in the year 1658, and by letters, and personal conversation, was the fon of a reputable merchant fettled him in full communion with of that town. His father was pof- the established church. fessed of a good share of learning, and Mr. Thorelby was well respected had a peculiar turn to the knowledge by the clergy and gentry of his town of antiquities; which being inherited and neighbourhood, and by all the by the fon, he employed his leisure eminent virtuofi and men of learning hours in visiting remarkable places, of his time. It would be almost endcopying monumental inscriptions, ftu- less to enumerate the assistances which dying their history, and particularly he gave, in one way or other, to the collecting accounts of protestant bene- works of the learned. When bishop factions. His father, designing him Gibson published his new edition of for his own business, fent him, in 1678, Camden’s Britannia, he wrote notes to Rotterdam, in order to learn the and additional observations on the Dutch and French languages, and to. Weft-riding of Yorkshire; for the use be perfected in mercantile accomplish-, of it; and transmitted above a hunments; but he was obliged to return, dred of his coins to Mr. Obadiah the year following, on account of his Walker, who undertook that province health. On the death of his father, which related to the Roman, British, in 1680, he entered on his business: and Saxon monies. Hearne often but, though commerce was his pro- acknowledged in print the favour of fession, yet learning and antiquities his correspondence. He communiwere his great delight; and they took cated to Strype fome original letters fo firm a possession of his heart, that, in his collection. He imparted to contenting himself with a moderate Calamy memoirs of several northern patrimony, he made those researches divines for his abridgment of · Baxthe great employment of his life. ter's Life and Times ;' as he did also There is a circumstance relating to of the worthy royalists to Walker, for him, in the unhappy times under his. Sufferings of the Clergy,' which James II, which we cannot pass over. was published as an antidote to CaHe had been bred among the presby: lamy's book; esteeming good men of terians ; but, never imbibing any of all parties worthy to have their names their rigid principles, had 'always oc- and characters transmitted to posterity. casionally conformed to the ellablifhed. His skill in heraldry and genealogy church : and now, when popery be- rendered him a very serviceable corgan to threaten the nation, he more respondent to Collins in his • Peerage frequently attended its worship, with a of England.' By these kindnesses, view of promoting an union among sweetened with the easiness of access the protestants for their mutual pre- to his own cabinet, he always found servation. His presbyterian pastor was the like easy admission to those of highly displeased with his compliance, others; which gave him frequent opand treated him with a very indiscrect portunities of enlarging his collection, zeal. This prompted Mr. Thoresby far beyond what could have been exto examine more closely the argu- pected from a private person, not ments on both sides, and to apply to wealthy. He commenced an early his diocesan and friend archbishop friend thip with the celebrated naturaliit Sharp (who, by the way, had a gcol Dr. Martin Lifter. To this friend he taite for coins and medals, and col- fent an account of some Roman antiVOL. XC.

X

quities,

quities he had discovered in York- Biographia Britannica, in order to Mire, which being communicated by excite lome able hand to carry it on, him and Dr. Gale, dean of York, to and compleat the noble design of the the royal society, he was enrolled a author. His advancement in years fellow of that learned body in 1697: hindering him from completing this and the great number of his papers, work, he contented himself with com. in their transactions, relating to an- mitting to the press his • Vicaria cient Roman and Saxon monuments in Leodienfis : or, The History of the the north of England, with notes upon Church of Leeds,' &c. which was them, and the inscriptions of coins, published in 1724, 8vo. &c. Thew how deserving he was of The subject of this work being narthat honour.

row and confined, he has enriched it He died in 1725, in his 68th year, with observations on the original of and was interred among his ancestors, parochial churches, and the ancient in St. Peter's church at Leeds. His manner of building them; as also on character for learning is beft feen in the old way of passing estates by dethe books he publithed, which shew livery of pledges, subscription of him to have been a great matter of golden crostes, pendent seals, &c: the history and antiquities of his own and, beside the memoirs of many country; to attain which, it became worthy divines successively vicars of necessary for him to be skilled, as he Leeds, he hath added the lives of the was, in genealogy and heraldry. He doctors Matthew Hutton, Edwyn appears

from these books to have been Sandys, Tobie Matthew, John Thoalso an industrious biographer : but resby, archbishops of York, and of that which sets his reputation the Henry earl of Huntingdon. highest as a scholar, was his uncom The museum of this learned antimon knowledge of coins and medals. quary formed one of the greatest and He had long formed a design of doing most valuable collection of antique and honour to his native town and its en- curious coins and medals, that had ever virons, by writing the history thereof; been in this country. At the sale of and had accumulated a vast quantity this museum in the month of March of materials for the work, which was 1764, the following medals and coins published in 1714, under the title of were sold as under: . Ducatus Leodienfis ; or, The To

s. d.

pography of Deeds and the parts ad- The famous copper medal or

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3 70

jacent. To which is subjoined, “Mu colonel Lilburne

2 17 0 seum Thoresbeianum; or, a Catalogue A Saxon penny of king Alof the Antiquities, &c. in the repofi fred's

4

IO tory of Ralph Thoresby, gent. &c.' Two pennies of Alfred and In the former piece, he frequently Ethelred refers to the historical part, intended One Eactachius for giving a view of the state of the One ditto struck at York 8 8 o northern parts of the kingdom during One Stephen and Henry the dark ages of the Britons and Ro- Two groats of Richard Iil. 3 30 mans; and of the alterations after- A proof piece for a penny of ward made by the Saxons, Danes, Henry VIII.

3 and Normans: and he proceeded fo A Scarborough fiege coin far, as to bring his narration in a fair Charles I.

7 70 copy nearly to the end of the sixth Ditto

7

2 6 century, illustrating and confirming A Commonwealth fixpence 3 60 his history by his coins. This curious Two farthings of Charles II. 3 4 0 unfinished manuscript is inserted in the

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