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the farm for one third or one fourth of pressure of population upon the availthe crops instead of for cash, as had been able supply of land, has been typical the former owners' method. This per- of every region of the country as it has centage plan stimulated the renters to reached its turn to be the frontier of such efforts that Mrs. Mathis's share rose cheap land. at once to $1,200 a year instead of $500, But these fluctuations cease when the which the owners had formerly got. land is all brought under profitable cultiFor the first two years the renters used vation. Thus in Pennsylvania the inthe land between the young trees of the crease in value from 1900 to 1910 was only orchard, paying enough rent for it to 14 per cent. For this reason the time is cover the additional expense of hoeing rapidly approaching when the sole profit The fourth year (1908) the first crop from the soil will come from skilful from 2,500 peach trees brought a clear cultivation and economical marketing. profit of $1,300, despite losses caused Hence the eagerness with which farmers by rain.

are studying scientific agriculture, coIn 1908, Mrs. Mathis sold one third of operative selling, and community land the farm - mostly timber land -- for $20 credit systems, to help make the profits an acre. She brought part of the rest of that soon can no longer be made merely the farm into cultivation and succeeded from land speculation. in keeping her rent returns

This experience points to a way to make $1,200 a year. In the spring of 1911, money. But only a part of it points to she sold the remaining two thirds at the way of sound and permanent develop$40 an acre.

ment of the country. The land that is From rent, crops, and sale of the land, sold this year for twice what it brought Mrs. Mathis received altogether consider- last year — such a transaction adds nothing ably more than $30,000. Her original to the wealth of the Nation. It chiefly investment was less than $5,000 and her measures the rate of diminishing opportotal investment was about $8,000. Her tunity of the land-hungry. net profit was about $25,000 or, distributed over the six years, about $4,000 a The World's Work is especially interyear. Mrs. Mathis is now successfully ested in helping to serve the broader managing a new investment in farm lands development of American agriculture that in another part of Alabama.

will follow the national understanding of Her experience illustrates the possibili- the general principles which underlie these ties for success upon the soil that open to constructive devices to facilitate permawomen who possess sound judgment, nent improvements in farming. One of agricultural skill, executive capacity, and its editors is devoting a large share of his capital. But it illustrates, also, and even time to an exhaustive study of land credits, more aptly, the way in which many large for in the ability to command ready farm successes in the United States have money for productive farm uses lies the been made, viz.: by selling the farm — hope of stability and independence in a after it has been tilled so profitably that life on the land. The World's WORK other people desire it — and taking as will devote much space to this subject. profit the increase in value over its original All of its readers who are anxious to cost. According to the last census, the help this great movement for the upaverage value per acre of all farm lands in building of the basic industry of the the United States increased 108 per cent. Nation can render a genuine service between 1900 and 1910. Individual states by placing at his disposal such facts as showed such astonishing increases as Texas, the rates of interest on farm loans in 209 per cent; Oregon, 213 per cent.; Okla- their neighborhoods and especially such homa, 246 per cent.; South Dakota, 249 incidents from real life as the story of per cent.; Montana and Idaho, 276 per men or communities that have solved, cent.; and Arizona, 475 per cent. Such even in part, the problem of coöperaincrease in values, brought about by the tive credit among farmers.

ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS ABOUT FARM LANDS

81.-Q. An article in the December village home with a small garden and some World's Work states that land can be bought chickens ought partly to supply these needs in northern Arkansas for $12 an acre and up- and satisfy your mild desire for country life. ward. From whom can I get information We have entire faith in the profits and pleasabout such land?

ures that farming can supply, and undoubtedly A. The Commissioner of Immigration, Little people in your circumstances have taken it up Rock, Ark.; F. S. White, St. Louis and San and succeeded; but everyone cannot be a farFrancisco Railroad, Springfield, Mo.; L. D. mer. You can do your part of the world's Bell, Missouri and North Arkansas Railroad, work in your present capacity better than Eureka Springs, Ark.; and William Nicholson, many others. Why not stick to it, make the Kansas City Southern Railway, Kansas most of your opportunities, and be glad? City, Mo.

84.-Q. What are the possibilities of apple 82. — Q. I want a blunt, impartial opinion raising and sheep raising in the Berkshire Hills of some land I have purchased in Harris County, of Massachusetts? Texas. I am told the climate and soils are

A. Natural conditions are good and ultigood and if so I want to settle there.

mately these types of farming, as well as A. Our chief criticism is of your inexcusable general stock raising, should prove profitable. and unwise purchase of land that you had not At present, however, the development of large seen. No outsider's opinion can take the place estates by wealthy persons has caused abof a personal inspection. Harris County is normally high prices; many of these “amaabout on the dividing line between the wooded teur farmers” dispose of their surplus products country of southeast, and the prairie country of at prices which cannot be expected to pay, southwest, Texas. Although it is uniformly thus spoiling the market for practical farmers. level, the soil conditions and natural vegetation The havoc wrought by uncontrolled dogs is a vary greatly. Vegetables, rice, cotton, corn, serious obstacle to sheep raising; and, in small fruits, figs, Satsuma oranges, hogs, and upland orchards, the injury done by deer cattle are raised in various parts of the county,

occasionally assumes threatening proportions. but we cannot say for which your particular land If these difficulties can be avoided or surmay be best fitted. Drainage is often needed mounted, the problem becomes merely one of on the heavier soils. Rainfall is abundant and scientific, business-like farming. the season of probable frosts lasts only about three months. The average value of farm land 85.-Q. I have an opportunity to buy is $32.97 an acre and, with the further develop- 400 acres in Leon County, Texas, west of the ment of agriculture, is likely to go higher. Trinity River. What of climatic and agri

cultural conditions there? 83. — Q. I am a successful instructor in

A. Thirty-nine inches of rain annually, engineering, getting $1,700 a year with good long, warm summers, mild winters with only prospects for the future. I enjoy the work and occasional cold spells and north winds, and am satisfied except that I am not entirely well fertile, level soils (sometimes requiring drainage) and would prefer outdoor work. We own 160 all contribute to the successful raising of a acres of rough timbered land in Arkansas and,

variety of crops, of which cotton, corn, hay, if I gave up my work, could move to it with

and peanuts are at present the most important. about $5,000 capital. I know a little about Marketing is not so easy, as much of the agriculture, but my wife was raised on a farm

country is inconveniently distant from railand we both like country life. We would not roads. On this account and because of its expect to farm on a large scale — just to make

soil-building value, stock should be kept. The a living. Do you think we ought to try it?

value of farm land is increasing, although it is A. Frankly, no. You are happy, satisfied, still only $7.84 an acre. About half the land and making good headway in an honorable of the county is utilized by its 2,863 farms, of occupation for which you have been educated which 52 per cent. are rented. The wisdom of and trained. Your health problem is pre- your prospective purchase depends upon the sumably one of habit, calling for more exercise exact location of the land and also upon the and a better arrangement of your time. A price you must pay.

ARTHUR W. PAGE, EDITOR

CONTENTS FOR JUNE, 1913

Frontispiece

Mr. Walter H. Page
THE MARCH OF EVENTS — AN EDITORIAL INTERPRETATION

123

Viscount Sutemi Chinda
Sir Cecil Arthur Spring-Rice
Dr. George E. Vincent
Prof. T. N. Carver

Mr. Wilbur J. Carr
Mr. P. P. Claxton
Mr. Richard C. Morse
Mrs. William C. Story
Sir Gilbert Parker

Gen. Mario Menocal
Rev. Henry Collin Minton
Kaiser Wilhelm II
The Growth of American Cities

A New National Mood
An Honest Tariff
The Income Tax
A Responsible Government
For Flexible Finance
Popularly Chosen Senators
The Cycles of Business and Politics
A Bureau Without Bureaucracy
The Obligations of the Monroe Doc-

trine
The Railroads and the Cost of Living

A Strike of Farmers' Wives
The Japanese Controversy
The Great Experiment in China
The Price of War
Fifty Years of Freedom
Backwaters of Humanity
A Great Opportunity
Descendants of the Devil
To Save Birds and Money
Local Care of Tuberculosis
A World's Work Announcement

INVESTMENT "CATS AND DOGS"

152 MR. BRYAN (Illustrated)

William BAYARD HALE 154 WHAT I AM TRYING TO DO (Illustrated) GEORGE MCANENY 172 THE NEW FREEDOM VI

WOODROW WILSON 182 WHAT TO DO WITH A BOY

LYMAN BEECHER STOWE

190 THE JAPANESE IN CALIFORNIA

CHESTER H. ROWELL

195 TRADE SCOUTS WHO CAPTURE MILLIONS - Lewis R. FREEMAN 201 THE Y. M. C. A. — MAKER OF MEN (Illus.) Lewis E. Theiss 206 THE NOVELS THAT SELL 100,000 (Illustrated) ARTHUR W. PAGE

220 THE TRUTH ABOUT “THE LITTLE RED SCHOOL”

228 A YEAR IN A COUNTRY SCHOOL

WILLIAM H. HAMBY 229 THE MARCH OF THE CITIES

· 236 FORWARD TO THE LAND -

238 OREGON ORGANIZING COUNTRY CHILDREN

Musa GEER 239

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Published monthly. Copyright, 1913, by Doubleday, Page & Company. All rights reserved. Entered at the Post Office at Garden City, N. Y., as second-class mail matter

Country Life in America The Garden Magazine - Farming 1918 Peoples Gas Bldg. DOUBLEDAY, PAGE & COMPANY,

GARDEN CITY

N. Y.

F. N. DOUBLEDAY, President

H. S. HOUSTON, Vice-President

S. A. EVERITT, Treas.

RUSSELL DOUBLEDAY, Sec'y

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Copyright by Harris & Ewing MR. WALTER H. PAGE FOL'NDER AND FOR TWELVE YEARS EDITOR OF THE “WORLD'S WORK," WHO HAS RETIRED FROM THE MANAGEMENT OF THIS MAGAZINE TO BECOME THE AMERICAN AMBASSADOR TO GREAT BRITAIN

See "The March of Events ?

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WINTER of wars abroad and quiet courage. It is our good fortune political upheaval at home, that President Wilson is such a man. followed by more wars abroad Enlightened self-interest has brought and floods and tariff revision a large proportion of business to believe at home, contrary to pre

in this new standard; for, after all, becedent brings a busy summer. In spite hind every business is a man, a part of the of the many disturbing occurrences and the great mass upon whose real prosperity all more numerous threatened disturbances, firm business prosperity rests. the United States is enjoying a more than But, however beneficial and necessary average prosperity. It is exhibiting anew the change itself, the process is disturbing. its fundamental strength.

New tariffs and new laws for business Yet there is not a buoyant mood among interrupt the even flow of daily transthose who direct the great enterprises of actions. The business world as a whole the country. The incoming of the Wilson feels that it would be false to the past Administration is the first step in a far if it were not a little apprehensive of more fundamental change than merely the future, and our corporate affairs will the changing of the governmental ma- therefore be managed conservatively. chinery from one group of men to another. And this conservatism among business For fifty years the criterion by which men and a sober, almost solemn, feeling of the United States judged itself was busi- responsibility that pervades the Adminisness. If a measure were good for business, tration at Washington augur well for a it was good for the country; if it were careful and considerate carrying out of the bad for business, it was bad for the country. changes which the public has demanded.

To change the standard by which the In the meanwhile, the railroads, the country judges itself from the narrower factories, and the farms are busy, especlassification of the special welfare of cially the farms. The unprecedented business to the broad foundation of the fruitfulness of the land forced a good year welfare of the consuming man — to do upon a doubting public and it now seems this without destruction and without as if nature this year again is plentifully animosity requires a man of patience and coming to our aid.

Copyright, 1913. by Doubleday, Page & Co. All rights reserved

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