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MR. BRYAN AS SECRETARY OF STATE A NEW PORTRAIT, TAKEN AT HIS DESK IN THE STATE DEPARTMENT AT WASHINGTON

mutual understanding and common sym- holding office as he once was in the habit of pathies go all the way around and across staying out of it. the council table. He thinks he will fall Here Mr. Bryan's smile provoked the so easily into the ways of an official that tale of an old darkey who was profoundly he may become the victim of the habit of surprised when he heard the news of Mr. Wilson's nomination at Baltimore. Nonplussed, the darkey asked a white friend:

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THIS HOUSE IN SALEM, ILL., IS LITTLE CHANGED FROM

“Who dat Marse Wilson de Democrats runnin' for President? I had idee old Marse Bryan mos' ginahly run.”

“Yes,” said Mr. Bryan, “it takes a man a little while to break his old habits and turn around. I was talking the other day with the working force of the Commoner, and I said that they might possibly have noticed some slight change in the policy of the paper. Heretofore, we had been‘agin' the Government, but we had now about concluded to support the Government — it seemed to be behaving itself of late, pretty well, on the whole.”

Then Mr. Bryan told a story of an editor who had been persuaded to see the

WHERE MR. BRYAN WAS BORN light on the subject of the Philippines. He was in great mental distress, as he

WHAT IT WAS 53 YEARS AGO wished to bring his paper around without stultifying himself. Finally, he

Bryan, exclaiming: “How's this for a achieved a new point of view and immedi

starter!”

Mr. Bryan's “starter” was the reately sat down and wrote a long editorial which he brought triumphantly to Mr.

nouncing of the Dollar Diplomacy in the Far East; it is a mistake to credit the President alone with the termination of that policy.

Soon after he had entered on his new office, I asked Mr. Bryan if he felt at home in it. “Your interests,” I said, “have appeared to be chiefly in questions of internal policy. Now that you have to deal with questions of external policy, as Minister of Foreign Affairs, do you feel that you are in rather a new field?”

“Not at all,” was his reply. And then, characteristically, “The principles upon which foreign questions must be dealt with are precisely the same as those which govern in dealing with internal questions. There are no moral principles applying to groups other than those that apply to individuals. For instance, if you ask me whether I believe in the command, Thou shalt not steal, I answer yes, without asking what the amount involved is. The amount is not material when there is a principle involved.”

"Nor is the character of the parties involved, I suppose?”

"Exactly. It does not matter whether MR. BRYAN IN 1883

they are individuals or governments. WHEN HE BEGAN TO PRACTISE LAW IN JACKSONVILLE,

And so, I find nothing new in the problems

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ILLINOIS

“Not at all. I am willing to go as far with arbitration as you can go, but I recognize that you cannot go farther than you can. No matter what you might say about what ought to be done, you have to do what the people are ready to do. You cannot move faster than the people. At this time it is impossible to have arbitration for all questions, and it is impossible to let anybody decide what questions can be submitted to arbitration. That is the trouble with all arbitration treaties; it was the trouble with those the last Administration worked on. You agree to arbitrate everything except questions of national integrity and honor. In the heat of a disagreement every ques

tion seems to involve the national honor. HIS RESIDENCE IN JACKSONVILLE, ILL. THE HOUSE IN WHICH HE AND MRS. BRYAN FIRST

Who is going to decide that?”
MADE THEIR HOME

Mr. Bryan has what he thinks is an

original plan for the preservation of peace. of international relations. The same rules As far back as 1905 he proposed it, at a that enable a man to live peaceably with dinner in Tokio, and the following June his neighbors can be applied to nations, he laid it before a London conference at and they will enable nations to live peace- which twenty-six nations were represented. ably with each other."

Hearing Mr. Bryan say it so confidently, with the superb lift of the head and the prophetic fire in his magnificent eye, one believed it — for a moment.

"But is that quite an accurate account of the matter?” I did manage to say. "In private life we have courts to which we are forced to go to settle our quarrels. In international life, there are no tribunals before which nations can be haled.”

"I was saying that the rules that apply between individuals, applied between nations, would enable them to live in peace. I was speaking of normal conditions. Of course, war cannot be considered a normal condition. (Mr. Bryan showed a slight lack of humor.) I was speaking of normal conditions and relations and of questions that ordinarily come up for consideration; the more perfectly you can apply to international affairs the moral principles that govern individuals, the less likely you are to have war. You do not need any new or different moral code.”

Copyright, 1908, by R B. Hindmarsh The new Secretary of State is not an

MR. BRYAN AS EDITOR advocate of international arbitration.

OUTSIDE THE OFFICE OF THE "COMMONER” IN LIN"Do you object to it?” I asked him.

COLN, NEB

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MR. BRYAN'S FORMER RESIDENCE AT LINCOLN, NEB. The plan proposes, not arbitration, but the idea is that wars that can be delayed investigation — compulsory investigation, till passions cool are not likely ever to be with world publicity. The gist of fought; and that when impartial inquiry

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"FAIRVIEW," THE BRYAN FARM AND HOME, NEAR LINCOLN

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