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ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS ABOUT FARM LANDS

102.-l. I have an opportunity to go on 113 is sufficient for ordinary results. The price acres of irrigated land in the San Luis Valley, seems quite fair for an established orchard; Colorado, from which I may have all the first nevertheless, when a sound farming propo year's crops and where money will be advanced sition rather than a business speculation to see me through the first season. I can take is wanted, we are invariably in favor of one son of 23 with me, and one of 16 just finish- the development of property by the resident ing high school could join us later. My salary purchaser. of $60 per month doesn't enable me to do all I want to for my family. Do you think I would 104.-l. In regard to dairy farming in be foolish to try the farm?

northern Wisconsin or Minnesota, would yoa A. A good irrigated farm of that size would advise beginning on new land — needing cleanbe a pretty poor one if it did not return better ing and breaking - or on an old, cultivated than $60 a month profit, under good manage

farm? My capital will not permit very extenment. But are you wholly satisfied as to the sive operations in either case. Do you think water supply on the place, the condition of the well of the general locality? land, the desirability of the location, the A. Answering your last question first, there certainty of markets and, especially, your are excellent opportunities as regards natural ability to run it? And does such a life appeal conditions, as well as markets and means of to you and your family? Any one who goes transportation. For persons with limited capito a farm under protest, with a preconceived tal the scrubby timber and logged-off land dislike for it, or merely desiring to better his usually offers the greatest inducements. But condition without knowing anything about there are two sides to this question. If you have farm work, will probably find the city more to sufficient ability and experience to run a dairy his liking at an even smaller salary than yours. farm you can afford to sink most of your capital The San Luis Valley, in general, is all right; in a well developed farm and established concern the question is as to this particular farm and that will begin to give returns at once — if you as to you as a farmer.

can find such a farm for sale. If you are not

experienced, you had better buy rough land and 103.-Q. Please give me information regard- a few cows, work up a business gradually, and ing orchard land in the Twin Falls district of keep a larger part of your cash for running the Spokane Valley, Idaho, offered for $500 an expenses until you gain knowledge and get well acre under a contract to plant and deliver a

on your feet, four-year-old, well-cared-for orchard. The advantage is that I could continue in my 105.-Q. What is the character of the present position during the unproductive years, lands and the climate in Wasatch County, and have the land about half paid for on taking Utah? possession. Would you advise me to try it, A. At Duchesne the average annual rainor to buy and develop raw, cheaper land,

fall is 9.9 inches, the average annual temmyself?

perature 44.6 degrees F., and the recorded range A. Much depends on the reputation and from 107 degrees above to 38 degrees below stability of the company offering the land. zero. Data as to the land are scant but we The advantage you mention is apparent, but find the statement that "the northeast corner remember that at the end of the time you may of the state (which includes Wasatch County) get just the sort of orchard you want or you is filled with high mountains covered with may not; and then you will have lost four trees and nutritious grasses." The latter renyears during which you might have been ders grazing possible, but agriculture is not familiarizing yourself with the locality, the land, extensively developed, as only 5 per cent. of the the markets, and the trees, and building a land is in farms. About 15,000 acres are in foundation for future success by giving personal tame grasses, 9,591 acres in alfalfa, 4,648 acres attention to the farm.

in oats, and 3,643 acres in wheat, of which the The locality is a splendid'one for fruit-raising. last three are probabiy grown under irrigation. The soil is of volcanic origin, strong and fertile, Commissioner of Agriculture H. T. Haines, at especially under irrigation. Water for this Salt Lake City, and the Agricultural College, at purpose is abundant although the rainfall Logan, may be able to give you other details.

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A FINANCIAL TALE OF TWO CITIES

617 INSURANCE THAT PREVENTS FIRE

FRANK WILLIAMS 619 LOW-RATE, LONG-TIME MONEY FOR THE FARMS R. W. Moss 623 McADOO (Illustrated) -

BURTON J. HENDRICK 626 THE BUSINESS OF CHRISTIANIZING THE WORLD (Illustrated)

CARL CROW 638 SWIFT AND CHEAP JUSTICE (1)

GEORGE W. ALGER 653 WHAT I AM TRYING TO DO

H. E. Miles 667 IN JUSTICE TO COLOMBIA

Earl HARDING 674 THE STRONG MAN OF CHINA (Illus.)

PHILIP H. PATCHIN 680 FORESTS OF USEFULNESS (Illus.)

HENRY S. GRAVES 691 OUR EXPENSIVE CHEAP LABOR

ARNO DOSCH 699 THE CHURCH MILITANT AGAINST THE SALOON

FRANK PARKER STOCKBRIDGE 703 FORWARD TO THE LAND AN AWAKENING IN Rural New ENGLAND

C. D. LEUPP 712 THE MARCH OF THE CITIES

714 THE GROWTH OF AMERICAN CITIES

715 MAN AND HIS MACHINES

716

TERMS: $3.00 a year; single copies, 25 cents. For Foreign Postage add $1.00; Canada 60 cents.

Published monthly. Copyright, 1913, by Doubleday, Page & Company. All rights reserved. Entered at the Post Office at Garden City, N. Y., as second-class mail matter

Country Life in America The Garden Magazine - Farming CHICAGO

GARDEN CITY 1918 Peopler Gus Bldg. DOUBLEDAY, PAGE & COMPANY,

Y. F.N. DOUBLEDAY, President H. S. HOUSTON, Vice-President S. A, EVERITT, Treas. RUSSELL DOUBLEDAY, Sec'y

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SYSTEM WORLD'S WORK" UNITED STATES

MR. GEORGE W. ALGER
LAWYER AND PUBLICIST, WHO HAS FORMULATED MANY USEFUL REFORMS IN OUR
LEGAL

AND WHO WRITES FOR THIS AND SUCCEEDING ISSUES OF "THE
ON THE CONSTRUCTIVE ASPECTS OF SWIFT AND CHEAP JUSTICE IN THE

(See Page !

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R.

ETRIBUTION has come upon New Haven was managed as a financial the New Haven Railroad for institution, not altogether as a railroad. its attempt to monopolize all Its situation is not only distressing to the transportation agencies in New England, but it shows to the whole

New England. A terrible country that even with the great improveseries of wrecks, culminating in the rear- ment in railroad methods, and with the end collision at North Haven, Conn., increased activity and power of the Interwhich killed more than twenty people, state Commerce Commission and of the is complete evidence that in equipment state commissions, it is possible for a great and in management this road has not lived system, serving a thickly settled and prosup to the ever increasing demands that perous manufacturing community, to are made upon it. It is in need of new fail in its primary purpose -- to give safe and costly equipment. In financial centres and efficient service. people feel (in the words of the Wall The wiser railroad men confine their Street Journal) that “the underlying cause energies to operating their roads, and in for inability to handle an enormous pres- this growing country this task affords a sure of business without accident is the wide enough scope for even the most concontinued assaults upon credit by politi- structive genius. Excursions into other cians and notoriety seekers, which makes fields have not proved successful. Railthe raising of new capital for necessary road meddling in politics was a boomeextensions almost an impossibility." rang that produced a violent anti-railroad

But the cause of the New Haven's feeling that expressed itself in legislation dilemma lies far deeper than the hostility which contained as much anger as wisdom. of politicians. The New Haven had Railroad excursions into monopoly and “raised” all the new capital that it needed high finance have wrecked many a road in to increase its facilities and to make its the past, and even under Mr. Harriman's operation safe. But it spent the money leadership such practices have not proved a for trolley lines and steamships. The lasting success. We should not need directors of the road used its credit to any more examples to prove that railestablish a far reaching monopoly. The roads should stick to the railroad business.

Copyright, 1913, by Doubleday, Page & Co. All rights reserved

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Copyright by Harris & Ewing MR. FRANCIS BURTON HARRISON THE FIRST GOVERNOR-GENERAL OF THE PHILIPPINES UNDER A DEMOCRATIC ADMINISTRATION, WHO HAS GIVEN UP HIS SEAT IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES TO TAKE UP HIS NEW DUTIES

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