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fiscal system of a new breadth and stability. for information from the visitor. But Already, also, President Wilson was taking with the utmost simplicity, there is also up details of the Government, and some of always an absolute and almost innocent its specific problems. Within two weeks faith in the power of a pure heart and a of his inauguration, he had announced the single eye. position of his Administration with regard The President's mornings (his mornings to the two chief concerns of our foreign last until half past one) are too fully policy: our attitude toward Latin-America occupied by appointments to allow of his and toward China. The atmosphere holding the public receptions in which his about the White House from the start predecessors used to indulge at the noon filled every visitor with the feeling that hour. The custom has arisen, as I have not a moment was to be lost; four years said, of giving visitors without appointwas not a day too long in which to do the ments cards admitting them to the East great things for which the people have Room of the White House at half past commissioned this Administration.

two in the afternoon. Things pass very rapidly in the oval The East Room, running the depth of the room. A "yes,” a memorandum on a mansion, with windows on three sides, with pad, a touch of the bell summoning a clerk, its four great fireplaces, three crystal a dozen times an hour starts the making chandeliers, its mirrors, its ornate decoraof a bit of history. Occasionally, a secre- tions of white and gold, is very different tary or a confidential stenographer comes from the rather shabby, business-like in softly and lays before the President a quarters in which the work of the morning paper to which a red tag is clipped — an is done. Under the direction of door"important and urgent” signal. All keepers, visitors are lined up around the through the rest of the building the air walls — for several hundred callers seek is palpitant with excitement. The news- to greet the President at these levees. paper men at the door scrutinize eagerly Promptly at 2.30 the great door swings every entrance and departure, slip in and open and, preceded by a smart aide in out of Mr. Tumulty's office to “get a line military uniform, the President steps on” one or another of a dozen mysterious rapidly out and takes a position in the rumors always current; the official staff, centre of the floor. The President has long habituated to rapid and important donned a black frock coat now, and the events, is keyed to the highest pitch in scene is more formal. its effort to regard and execute the deci- The procession past him begins. Each sions of the man at the centre of all this person, introduced by the aide, shakes the activity. But there is no excitement there, President's hand and presents his greetings no haste. If ever a man was born to or performs his errand. At the head of govern, Mr. Wilson was; to govern confi- the line one day is Colonel Eustis, chairman dently, though graciously. Here he is, this of the Inauguration Committee, supported student of thirty cloistered years who had by a few of his colleagues, who have come never been inside the White House until to present Mr. Wilson with the medal cast the day of his inauguration, to whom the to commemorate the inauguration. Three City of Washington was still practically Commissioners of the District of Columbia unknown — here he is, sitting in the very present their compliments. Next in line centre of the Nation's business and setting is a character who calls himself the "King about the administration of its government of the Newsboys.” The “King” says a with the grave but easy confidence, the formal little speech and gets a word of poise and equanimity, of one born to the good-will for the juvenile disseminators of heritage of the chief chair of State, trained diurnal literature. Mr. Samuel Untermyer from his childhood in its expected duties, is in line; as is the retiring Solicitor-General and experienced for years in their execu- – Mr. Bullitt has a good deal of manner tion. There is no assumption of knowing and makes his little speech of good-bye as everything; very often indeed there is a happily as if it were one of gratitude. naive confession of ignorance and a request. A little further down the line is some one bearing a large photograph which he begs are made. They show no great originality the President to accept. Others have in their way of expressing their feelings; photographs which they beg to have auto- commonly they utter one of the commongraphed. Here is a Congressman intro- place salutations of ordinary life; they wish ducing a mother of an army officer who has him “luck” in one phrase or another. But fallen into difficulty. Here is a Senator whether it be that for the average citizen with two of his important constituents his presentation to the President is a rare who have a request to prefer. Next comes moment, or whether it be that Woodrow a lady, an old acquaintance, who brings Wilson has already gained an unusual her little daughter for the grace of a greet- place in the affections of the people, it is ing from the President.

impossible not to see that the good wishes Perhaps one third of those in line have have an intensity of feeling behind them. some particular word to say or request to I was surprised and impressed to remark make; the majority, however, have come how many different sorts of people — merely to wish the President luck. And it prosperous looking men, benevolent is very evident in most cases that the wish looking old ladies, brisk young chaps — is sincere and even profound. It is a very said: “God bless you!” So spoke scores. instructive and touching thing to watch I think the President must have been for a few days this procession at the after- touched by this exercise of the priestly noon receptions, and to observe the function of a people by the spontaneous attitude toward their President of the lips of its representatives. I fancy he representatives of the mass of the people must find no little inspiration in this daily with nothing to ask. They come from benediction. “Up from the common soil, all parts of the country: “Tennessee," up from the quiet heart of the people, rise "Indiana," "Kansas,” “Rhode Island,” the streams of hope and eulogy," he has succeeding one another as the introductions said again and again.

MY WORK FOR CRIPPLED CHILDREN

HOW, THOUGH LAME, AND WITHOUT MONEY OR FRIENDS, I BUILT UP A HOSPITALSCHOOL IN DETROIT IN WHICH HELPLESS BOYS AND GIRLS ARE

TAUGHT TO BE HAPPY AND USEFUL

BY

Detroit with so 'a

Hospital in I lived to get

BLANCHE VAN LEUVEN BROWNE HEN I look back on I was twenty-two when I left my home that day seven years in Milford to go out into the gray world, ago — the day I came and keep the vow I had made seven years to Detroit with $6 in before when I lay on a cot in St. Luke's

my purse and not a Hospital in Chicago. I told the doctor friend in all the big bustling city — I won then that if I lived to get well I would der whether it was ignorance or courage dedicate my frail powers to the rescue of that kept me from turning back and giving little crippled children, who seemed to me up the fight. I may as well tell you from the most neglected of all things that lived. the beginning that I am a cripple; that from The strange thing now seems that, my childhood I have had a hopelessly crippled as I was, grotesquely slim of twisted spine, and that only because of my purse and friendless and terror-stricken knowledge gained at first hand of the im- by my audacity, I was exaltedly happy. potent misery of most cripples, was I en- You must know what was in my mind abled to face the terrors that a city holds and heart to understand why I was spurred for one so handicapped as I am.

on by the enthusiasm of the blind devotee. I will transcribe from an interview that a useless burdens. Some of these people reporter - a sympathetic young woman sent me checks. I treasured every penny - wrote about me in her paper not long like a greedy Midas, living meagrely. after I came to Detroit:

When I had gathered a few months' rent

I took a modest little house, furnished it It's terrible when you consider how a crippled child is treated. If he happens to be born in a

scantily with a few borrowed things,

s prosperous family he is petted and pampered

and with one little crippled tot started and coddled and wrapped in cotton wool to my work. A prominent business man, grow up unhappy, uneducated, undisciplined to whom my ideas appealed, became - an affliction to himself and to those who treasurer, and $1,000 was paid in. love him. If he is born in a poor family his He was a much harassed man of affairs, condition is pitiable beyond words — and and when he saw the little ship launched naturally most of them are poor. Is it nec- he abandoned his post. Then a board of essary that, because a man or a woman is

fashionable ladies was formed. They came crippled, selling pencils or gum or shoe-strings

in fine touring cars and electric broughams. on the street corners should be the only occupation open to them?

They undoubtedly were the financial and Why shouldn't they be taught to do things? social aristocrats of the city, and I really Many of them have nimble, skilful fingers, and think they meant to help me. most of them have as keen, live brains as any But the children came fast and the one. Only a place in which their bodies are money came slowly, and though they were treated while their hands and brains are children who needed the most skilful trained can lift the tragedies from the lives of treatment, unceasing care, and special crippled children. I want a hospital-school and,

nourishment, and though very few of with the help of God and kind human hearts,

those brought to me were prepared to I'm going to establish one right here in Detroit.

pay a cent, I thank God that I never The reporter referred to me as the turned a cripple away. There were awful crippled crusader, told of the dollar-a- hours of anxiety, of course, but at the week room in which she found me, and critical time relief was sure to come. A spoke in a most kindly and appreciative little story in one of the newspapers, for way of my theories and aims.

example, brought in hundreds of dollars To-day my dream has been partly in a few days. One of the checks for nearly realized. From my room here in the $200 came from the Board of Commerce, hospital-school I can hear the laughter The day the story was printed they were of poor little Joe, of Hazel, and Esther – sitting around their big mahogany conall crippled, but aflame with the joy of ference table discussing civic problems living. And as I look back on the bitter when the secretary read the story aloud. days — the objections of fashionable “Pass the hat,” said some one, and they neighborhoods, the annihilating self- tossed the dollars into it, and the secretary assurance of fashionable boards of trustees, wrote a letter that made me cry for joy. the deadening apathy of people generally, But with all the encouragement and when confronted by so unimposing a help from without I know my work must person as myself — I realize that it was have died but for the coming of Laura all worth while.

O'Neill. She was young and strong, Before I came to Detroit I had written skilful and beautiful, and full of the desire a little book out of my experiences in the to serve. The ideas I was trying to work hospital, and it brought me small returns. out in the little place where now a big I took subscriptions for magazines, and family of little cripples were gathered so kept myself from being submerged. appealed strongly to her. Indeed, she And all the while, with but one thought was fired with an enthusiasm no less than in mind, I never lost a chance to tell the my own. She offered to join me in my men and women I met the story of how work, although I told her of the struggle little crippled children suffer, not only in I was having and how, much as I needed their bodies but in their hearts and souls, just such help, I had nothing to pay her because they are regarded as deadwood, with. She insisted on coming to me,

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leaving a salary of $25 a week for whatever ing for cripples. I was protesting against the fates provided. It turned out to be the cold, statistical charity that system$6 a month for a long time, which that atizes and tabulates and classifies everysplendid heroic soul accepted laughingly, thing in the interests of order, and forgets saying she didn't know what she'd do that it is dealing with living, feeling, with it. For myself there was a roof and human beings. I told them that I was food; but both of us were so happy that willing to give up my life to have my ideas people commented upon it.

for crippled children carried out, and that But a day dawned that had no happi- only as the head of the hospital-school ness for me and much bitterness — the would this be possible. They persisted, bitterness that comes from having your and I did a thing the boldness of which most cherished ideals utterly misunder- makes me shiver to think of now — 1 stood. That day my fashionable board dismissed the fashionable board outright. met. They came, exquisitely dressed, There were seven children in the home with their quiet, reposeful manners, the at the time, a big grocery bill, a month's insignia of good breeding, to do their rent due, and other expenses. I conferred duty by the hospital-school. Their duty, with Miss O'Neill. as they saw it, was to put a trained, “There is just $10 in the treasury,” scientific worker in my place.

she said, “and that is not a very secure "You aren't a trained nurse, you know," backing." they told me. “You haven't been edu- "No," I answered, feeling the need to cated in approved schools to carry on justify myself and raise her courage; the work you started. You are useful “but $10 and God is a very comfortable and devoted and we appreciate you backing, and I'm going to stake my life's thoroughly, but we think the hospital- hopes and ambitions on it.” school should be managed by one who I told her that I did not know much has made a scientific study of these things." about the public, nor how they would

The tumult that arose in my breast I regard me under such circumstances, but shall never be able to describe. I suffered that I did know physicians and that I felt terribly to be so misunderstood. It was confident our children would not be left out of my very own deep, sad experience without medical attendance. that I was enabled to do for children And they were not. crippled and maimed the things that The board — or ex-board, to be exact were not being done and that cried to — sent out notices telling of their severed me to be done. With trembling knees connections with the hospital-school. One and dry lips I rose to answer the fashion- of these reached the city editor of one of able board. If I could only make them the papers, and he sent a reporter to get realize a little of what I knew, they would the story. Of course they made a “good understand, I thought.

story” of it, coming out with a word"What these children need, above all picture of two women fighting the world things, is love and understanding.” I told for their crippled dependents. This led them. “Especially the little crippled poor to many newspaper articles about our yearn to be loved and cared for and nursed children. Reporters came often from all and at the same time to have their self- the papers. They seemed to think we esteem increased, to be made to feel that yielded interesting material and the pubthey have useful futures. They need to licity did us a great deal of good. One be made to feel that they have a place in article achieved big headlines on the front Society and to that end they must be taught page in this striking phrase: to do useful things with which they can “Little Hazel Welch dances in her earn bread and happiness and self-respect shroud.” in the future.”

It was true, and out in Hazel's homeAs I spoke to them I felt myself passion- town of Adrian the papers copied it with ately moved to plead to the utmost of cheerful comments. It brought me a my powers, because I was a cripple plead- check for $100 the next day. The facts

sponsible di

fairy-like cause of her pecially

were that the doctors had given up Hazel board. 1 yielded and my heart-breaking to the extent that her mother had made scene with the first one was re-enacted. her an exquisite little white dress for a But if, as a board, these ladies were unshroud. Hysterical paralysis was doing willing to hazard the untried; if, as reits worst for the little girl. She couldn't sponsible directors, they were inclined walk a step. People were especially to regard me as visionary, and my Utopia stirred by her plight, because of her beauty, for Cripples such stuff as dreams are made which has the fairy-like quality of a Greuze of, I am happy to say they held an entirely painting. It was simply a case of building different attitude as individuals. Nearly up her body and restoring her courage. all of them pledged themselves to stand

And just herein lies the kernel of my by me through my struggles. creed for cripples. Often their discourage- But with the coming of winter there ment is akin to despair. It is one of the were the faintest warnings of the wolf's most appalling tragedies in the world. menacing snarl. There was little money, They feel their self-abasement directly and twenty-three crippled children in the because their families and Society generally house. It was a rented house that I had condemn them to lives of burdensome secured for $35 a month, although it inefficiency. And think how utterly false was worth much more, and a well known and unjust such a position is! Hazel is young society woman with a big indeone of the many proofs we have to offer. pendent fortune of her own paid that rent We began, of course, by building up her for many months. But I was terribly body. She responded magically. She has harassed for funds, and fearfully I apa keen mind and a sensitive emotional proached another rich woman I knew, nature. We restored her courage — even for the loan of $500. I did not have to aroused her fighting blood. With the beg for it. increase of her strength came the desire “My husband and I will give it to you to run and romp. Little by little she - not as a loan, for you have worries gained control over the muscles of her enough without thinking of paying it legs. I sent her to dancing school, a back, but as a gift because we believe in dancing master having offered to take my you,” she told me. children into his classes. I let the re- So there was an occasional glimpse of porter see her dance and he described her silver lining in the dark clouds that pirouetting lightly over the floor as the floated over us. sun made topaz lights in her yellow hair. The next embarrassing incident had

There is Marjorie, who came to us its humorous angle. At least the papers emaciated and blind from neglect. She is saw it that way if we didn't. The esthetic a dimpled cherub now, and the doctors say sensibilities of a neighborhood were bruised that she will see in time. Esther was left at the sight of physically sub-normal on our doorstep one miserable night. She children playing out on the lawn or about weighed six pounds and looked like noth- the porch of the house where we lived. ing so much as one of those unfeathered It was not an ultra-smart neighborhood, sparrows who fall from their nests in the either, but one where the air was pure, and spring time. Such havoc had malnu- considered desirable by young parents trition and exposure wrought that it bringing up their children. The papers taxed our care to the utmost to restore poked good-natured fun at the superher. Now Botticelli would like to paint esthetic feelings of these patrician neighher, so soft and round are her contours. bors of our family of little cripples and The reporters wrote about all these so killed, by their facetious comments, children, and about many others; and an entanglement that might otherwise every story brought a check or more. have gotten into court.

But it was hard getting along, and most Everything pointed to the need of a of the time Miss O'Neill and I managed home of our very own. But where to get to forget about such things as salaries. the money? It was then that I started Then many people urged me to get another the hospital-school magazine, not only

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