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Speed. And yet I was last chidden for being too slow.

Val. Go to, sir ; tell me, do you know madam Silvia ?

Speed. She that your worship loves ?
Val. Why, how know you that I am in love?

Speed. Marry, by these special marks: First, you have learned, like sir Proteus, to wreath your arms like a male-content; to relish a love-song, like a Robin-red-breast; to walk alone, like one that had the pestilence; to sigh, like a school-boy that had lost his A B C; to weep, like a young wench that had buried her grandam; to fast, like one that takes diet; 1 to watch, like one that fears robbing; to speak puling, like a beggar at Hallowmas. You were wont, when you laughed, to crow like a cock; when you walked, to walk like one of the lions; when you fasted, it was presently after dinner; when you looked sadly, it was for want of money: and now you are metamorphosed with a mistress, that, when I look on you, I can hardly think you my master.

Val. Are all these things perceived in me?
Speed. They are all perceived without ye.
Val. Without me? they cannot.

Speed. Without you ? nay, that 's certain ; for, without you were so simple, none else would : but you are so without these follies, that these follies are within

1 To 'take diet' was the phrase for being under regimen for a disease,

2 About the feast of All Saints, when winter begins, and the life of a vagrant becomes less comfortable.

you, and shine through you like the water in an urinal; that not an eye, that sees you, but is a physician to comment on your malady.

Val. But, tell me, dost thou know my lady Silvia ?

Speed. She, that you gaze on so, as she sits at supper?

Val. Hast thou observed that? even she I mean. Speed. Why, sir, I know her not.

Val. Dost thou know her by my gazing on her, and yet knowest her not?

Speed. Is she not hard-favored, sir?
Val. Not so fair, boy, as well-favored.
Speed. Sir, I know that well enough.
Val. What dost thou know?

Speed. That she is not so fair, as (of you) wellfavored.

Val. I mean, that her beauty is exquisite, but her favor infinite.

Speed. That's because the one is painted, and the other out of all count.

Val. How painted ? and how out of count?

Speed. Marry, sir, so painted, to make her fair, that no man counts of her beauty.

Val. How esteemest thou me? I account of her beauty.

Speed. You never saw her since she was deformed.
Val. How long hath she been deformed ?
Speed. Ever since you loved her.

Val. I have loved her ever since I saw her; and still I see her beautiful.

Speed. If you love her, you cannot see her.

Val. Why?

Speed. Because love is blind. O, that you had mine eyes; or your own eyes had the lights they were wont to have, when you chid at sir Proteus for going ungartered !

Val. What should I see then ?

Speed. Your own present folly, and her passing deformity; for he, being in love, could not see to garter his hose; and you, being in love, cannot see to put on your hose.

Val. Belike, boy, then you are in love; for last morning you could not see to wipe my shoes.

Speed. True, sir; I was in love with my bed : I thank you, you swinged me for my love, which makes me the bolder to chide you for yours.

Val. In conclusion, I stand affected to her.

Speed. I would you were set; so, your affection would cease.

Val. Last night she enjoined me to write some lines to one she loves.

Speed. And have you ?
Val. I have.
Speed. Are they not lamely writ?

Val. No, boy, but as well as I can do them :Peace, here she comes.

Enter SILVIA.

Speed. O excellent motion !1 O exceeding puppet! Now will he interpret to her.

· Puppet-show.

Val. Madam and mistress, a thousand good

morrows.

Speed. O, 'give ye good even ! here's a million of manners.

[aside. Sil. Sir Valentine and servant,1 to you two thousand.

Speed. He should give her interest; and she gives it him.

Val. As you enjoin'd me, I have writ your letter, Unto the secret nameless friend of yours; Which I was much unwilling to proceed in, But for my duty to your ladyship.

Sil. I thank you, gentle servant: 'tis very clerkly! done.

Val. Now trust me, madam, it came hardly off; For, being ignorant to whom it goes, I writ at random, very doubtfully. Sil. Perchance you think too much of so much

pains ? Val. No, madam; so it stead you, I will write, Please you command, a thousand times as much :

And yet,

Sil. A pretty period ! Well, I guess the sequel ; And yet I will not name it :-and yet I care not;, And yet take this again ;-and yet I thank you ; Meaning henceforth to trouble you no more. Speed. And yet you will; and yet another yet.

[aside.

I Lovers were called servants by their mistresses at the time when Shakspeare wrote.

2 Like a scholar.

you:

Val. What means your ladyship? do you not

like it? Sil. Yes, yes; the lines are very quaintly writ: But since unwillingly, take them again; Nay, take them.

Val. Madam, they are for you.

Sil. Ay, ay; you writ them, sir, at my request; But I will none of them; they are for I would have had them writ more movingly.

Val. Please you, I'll write your ladyship another. Sil. And, when it's writ, for my sake read it

over : And, if it please you, so; if not, why, so.

Val. If it please me, madam ! what then?

Sil. Why, if it please you, take it for your labor; And so good-morrow, servant. [Exit Silvia.

Speed. O jest unseen, inscrutable, invisible, As a nose on a man's face, or a weathercock on a

steeple ! My master sues to her; and she hath taught her

suitor, He being her pupil, to become her tutor. O excellent device! was there ever heard a better? That my master, being scribe, to himself should

write the letter? Val. How now, sir ? what are you reasoning 1 with yourself?

Speed. Nay, I was rhyming; 'tis you that have the

reason.

Discoursing.

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