A Course of English Reading,adapted to Every Taste and Capacity: With Anecdotes of Men of Genius

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Carey & Hart, 1848
 

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Strana 13 - To the very moment that he bade me tell it : Wherein I spake of most disastrous chances, Of moving accidents, by flood, and field ; Of hair-breadth scapes i...
Strana 13 - Wherein of antres vast and deserts idle, Rough quarries, rocks, and hills whose heads touch heaven, It was my hint to speak, — such was the process: And of the Cannibals that each other eat, The Anthropophagi, and men whose heads Do grow beneath their shoulders.
Strana 6 - Idleness is a disease which must be combated ; but I would not advise a rigid adherence to a particular plan of study '. I myself have never persisted in any plan for two days together. A man ought to read just as inclination leads him : for what he reads as a task will do him little good. A young man should read five hours in a day, and so may acquire a great deal of knowledge.
Strana 21 - In every work regard the writer's end, Since none can compass more than they intend; And if the means be just, the conduct true, Applause, in spite of trivial faults, is due.
Strana 6 - If a man begins to read in the middle of a book, and feels an inclination to go on, let him not quit it, to go to the beginning. He may perhaps not feel again the inclination.
Strana 10 - The travellers into the East tell us that, when the ignorant inhabitants of those countries are asked concerning the ruins of stately edifices yet remaining amongst them, the melancholy monuments of their former grandeur and long-lost science, they always answer that they were built by magicians.
Strana 53 - A Critical Commentary and Paraphrase on the Old and New Testament and the Apocrypha. By Patrick, Lowth, Arnald, Whitby, and Lowman.

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