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34 ins

34 ins

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(Where posts are distant from a city, and the baggage of officers and men has to be delivered at a large station, a baggage check like this, used by

ment with the baggage agent, is a great convenience in checking bag. gage from post to baggage room.)

24)

-100

251 50 On Memorandum

St. Article: Chairs, barrack.

5 ins.

(A loose leaf file to be kept in connection with the memorandum receipts which are numbered 1, 2, 3, etc., according to the numbers of the build ings in which the articles are. A separate sheet to be kept for each article out on Memo. receipt.) V

MEMORANDUM RECEIPT FOR SUPPLIES IN USE.

.190.. I acknowledge to have received from the Quartermaster, at. the following articles for use of

I am responsible for said supplies and will produce the same when called upon to
do so by proper authority.
Axes.
Hods, coal.

Pots, iron with cover.
Axes, fire,
Hoes, garden.

Pots, mustard.
Bags, Barrack.
Holders, card.

Racks, pen.
Barrels, ash.

Hose, assorted, feet. Ranges, cooking.
Bars, Mosquito.
Inkstands.

Rakes, steel.
Baskets, assorted.
Inkwells.

Refrigerators.
Bedsteads, iron, com-
Kettles, tea.

Salt-cellars.
Blowers, grate.
Knives, bread.

Saucers.
Boats, gravy.
Knives, butcher.

Saws, meat.
Boilers, assorted.
Knives, table.

Scales and weights.
Bowls.
Ladders, fire.

Screens, door.
Bowls, chopping,
Ladles, soup.

Screens, fire.
Bowls, sugar.
Lamps, desk.

Screens, porch.
Boxes, pepper.
Lanterns.

Screens, window.
Brushes, dust.
Litters, hand.

Scuttles, coal.
Buckets, fire.
Lockers, box.

Sets, carving.
Buckets, G. I., as. Lockers, wall.

Shades, window.
sorted.
Carts, hand.
Mats, cuspidor.

Sheets, bed.
Cases, pillow.
Mats, door, cocoa.

Shovels, fire.
Cases, telescope.
Mats, door, wire.

Shovels, L. H.
Chairs, barrack.
Mattresses.

Shovels, scoop.
Chairs, office.
Mills, coffee.

Shovels, S. H.
Cleaners, flue.
Nozzles, hose.

Sieves, flour.
Cleavers.
Openers, can.

Skillets.
Clocks, office.
Padlocks.

Skimmers.
Cords and Tassels, Pans, bake.

Spades.
trumpet.
Covers, mattress.
Pans, dish.

Spittoons.
Cots, G. M.
Pans, dust.

Spoons, basting:
Cruets, vinegar.
Pans, frying.

Spoons, mustard.
Cups, sponge.
Pans, sauce.

Spoons, table.
Cups, tea.

Paulins.

Spoons, tea.
Cutters, meat.
Pickaxes.

Steel, carving.
Desks, field.

Pillows.

Squares, assorted.
Desks, office, assorted. Pins, tent, large.

Stands, fire.
Dippers, assorted.
Pins, tent, small.

Steamers, with covers.
Dishes, pickle.
Pins, shelter tent.

Stools, mess.
Dishes, vegetable.
Pipe, stove, joints.

Stoves, tent.
· Elbows, stovepipe.
Pitchers, syrup.

Stoves, heating.
Extinguishers, fire.
Pitchers, water.

Stoves, laundry:
Flies, wall tent.
Plates, dinner.

Tables, assorted.
Forks, meat.
Plates, meat.

Tables, mess.
Forks, table.
Plates, soup.

Tables, office.
Graters, assorted.
Pokers, fire.

Tents, common.
Griddles.

Poles, ridge wall tent. Tents, conical wall.
Guards, spark.
Poles, ridge, common

Tents, hospital.

tent. Hatchets, assorted.

Poles, ridge, hospital Tents, shelter halves.

tent.
Heaters, iron.
Poles, shelter tent.

Tents, wall.
Poles, conical wall

Tongs, fire.
tent.
Poles, upright wall Tripods, conical wall
tent.

tent.
Poles, upright com-

Trumpets.
mon tent.
Poles, upright hospi- Tumblers.

tal tent.
Pot, coffee.

[graphic]

No..........
(Number of building in which the articles are).

CHAPTER VIII

THE POST COMMISSARY

(See corresponding chapter in SUPPLEMENT for additional matter and changes, if any.)

DUTIES

The proper performance of the duty of Commissary, like the proper performance of any other duty, requires work and attention to business.

Study carefully and master completely the manual for the Subsistence Department and everything in the Army Regulations pertaining to the Subsistence Department.

Study the Hand Book of Subsistence Stores, which among other things, describes the care and preservation of subsistence stores.

There are two cardinal rules which every Commissary should observe:

I

2

Take a careful inventory personally of stores once every month, as required by Army Regulations.

Keep a cash sales book, in which all cash sales are entered daily. Examine this book daily, see that it is correctly kept, and each day receive from the commissary sergeant the cash from sales of the preceding day, and deposit them in the office safe.

He should check all commissary papers personally, and not take the word of the commissary sergeant that they are correct.

A childish confidence in commissary sergeants has caused more than one officer to put his hand in his pocket and pay out good money to satisfy the demands of a heartless auditor.

He should go over all requisitions carefully to see that he does not ask for more of any article than he needs; also to see that he is asking for everything that is really necessary.

1For the proper method of messing troops traveling by rail, the expenditure of liquid coffee, money, etc., see Supplement, Chap. XXI, "Field Service,” Par. 133.

He should try to avoid getting the commissary loaded up with articles for which there is no demand. When he finds he has a lot of supplies for which there is no demand, he should get authority to ship them away.

If serving in the tropics he should be especially careful to see that all stores are protected from dampness and that there is a good current of air in the storerooms. Vinegar barrels should be frequently examined and the hoops kept tight to avoid leakage.

If there are no hydrants, or sufficient fire apparatus at the post, he should be careful to see that fire buckets and barrels filled with water are kept in the storerooms, or in their immediate vicinity, for used in case of fire.

No credit sales should be made to officers except on written orders. (Charge sales slips, Form 60, are used for this purpose).

A Loss of Funds. For action to be taken in case of the loss of public funds, see “Loss of Funds,” page 142.

B Books of Reference, Maps, etc., and Blank Forms to be kept on hand, and Reports, Returns, Estimates and Requisitions to be made by the Commissary. See Supplement, Chap. VIII, Pars. 75, 76, 77, 78, 79.

С Rubber Stamps Usually used in the Office of the Commissary. (Required for on Form 50, the stamps desired being described on back of requisition, under "Remarks.")

1.

Office of the Gommissary,

For Des Moines, Lowa,

(Letterhead)

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