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To entertain us in his gallery :

Let us salute him.-Save thee, Barabas!
Bara. Welcome, great Calymath!
Fern. How the slave jeers at him! [A side.
Bara. Will't please thee, mighty Selim Caly.
math,

To ascend our homely stairs? Caly. Ay, Barabas.—

Come, bassoes, ascend.*

Fern. [coming forward] Stay, Calymath; For I will shew thee greater courtesy Than Barabas would have afforded thee. Knight. [within] Sound a charge there!

[4 charge sounded within: FERNEZE cuts the cord; the floor of the gallery gives way, and BARABAS falls into a caldron placed in a pit.

Enter Knights and MARTIN DEL BOSCO.†

Caly. How now! what means this?
Bara. Help, help me, Christians, help!
Fern. See, Calymath! this was devis'd for

thee.

Caly. Treason, treason! bassoes, fly!

Fern. No, Selim, do not fly:

See his end first, and fly then if thou canst.
Bara. O, help me, Selim! help me, Christians!
Governor, why stand you all so pitiless?

Fern. Should I in pity of thy plaints or thee, Accursed Barabas, base Jew, relent?

No, thus I'll see thy treachery repaid,
But wish thou hadst behav'd thee otherwise.
Bara. You will not help me, then?
Fern. No, villain, no.

Bara. And, villains, know you cannot help me

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To pinch me with intolerable pangs :

Die, life! fly, soul! tongue, curse thy fill, and die ! [Dies.

Caly. Tell me, you Christians, what doth this portend?

Fern. This train he laid to have entrapp'd thy life;

Now, Selim, note the unhallow'd deeds of Jews;
Thus he determin'd to have handled thee,
But I have rather chose to save thy life.

Caly. Was this the banquet he prepar'd for us? Let's hence, lest further mischief be pretended.+ Fern. Nay, Selim, stay; for, since we have thee here,

We will not let thee part so suddenly:
Besides, if we should let thee go, all's one,
For with thy galleys couldst thou not get hence,
Without fresh men to rig and furnish them.

Caly. Tush, governor, take thou no care for that; My men are all aboard,

And do attend my coming there by this.

Fern. Why, heard'st thou not the trumpet sound a charge?

Caly. Yes, what of that?

Fern. Why, then the house was fir'd,
Blown up, and all thy soldiers massacred.
Caly. O, monstrous treason!
Fern. A Jew's courtesy ;

For he that did by treason work our fall,
By treason hath deliver'd thee to us :
Know, therefore, till thy father hath made good
The ruins done to Malta and to us,

Thou canst not part; for Malta shall be freed, Or Selim ne'er return to Ottoman.

Caly. Nay, rather, Christians, let me go to Turkey,

In person there to mediate‡ your peace :
To keep me here will naught advantage you.

Fern. Content thee, Calymath, here thou must stay,

And live in Malta prisoner; for come all the world

To rescue thee, so will we guard us now,
As sooner shall they drink the ocean dry,
Than conquer Malta, or endanger us.
So, march away; and let due praise be given
Neither to Fate nor Fortune, but to Heaven.

[Exeunt.

train] i. e. stratagem.

+ pretended] i. e. intended. mediate] Old ed. "meditate."

§ all] Old ed. "call."

EDWARD THE SECOND.

The troublesome raigne and lamentable death of Edward the second, King of England: with the tragicall fall of proud Mortimer: And also the life and death of Peirs Gaueston, the great Earle of Cornewall, and mighty favorite of king Edward the second, as it was publiquely acted by the right honorable the Earle of Pembrooke kis seruauntes. Written by Chri. Marlow Gent. Imprinted at London by Richard Bradocke, for William Jones, dwelling neere Holbourne conduit, at the signe of the Gunne, 1598. 4to.

The troublesome raigne and lamentable death of Edward the second, King of England: with the tragicall fall of proud Mortimer. And also the life and death of Peirs Gaueston, the great Earle of Cornewall, and mighty fauorite of King Elward the second, as it was publiquely acted by the right honorable the Earle of Pembrooke his seruants. Written by Christopher Marlow Gent. Printed at London for Roger Barnes, and are to be sould at his shop in Chauncerie Lane ouer against the Rolles, 1612. 4to.

The troublesome raigne and lamentable death of Edward the second, King of England: with the Tragicall fall of proud Mortimer. And also the life and death of Peirs Gauestone, the great Earle of Cornewall, and mighty Fauorite of King Edward the second. As it was publikely Acted by the late Queenes Maiesties Seruants at the Red Bull in 8. Johns streete. Written by Christopher Marlow Gent. London, Printed for Henry Bell, and are to be sold at his Shop, at the Lamehospitall Gate, neere Smithfield, 1622. 4to.

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