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1845. Liverpool Health of Towns Advocate. Edited by Dr. Sutherland.

Published monthly from Sep. 1st to July 1st, 1847. 1847. The Liverpool Lion (afterwards added—or, Lancashire Charivari.)

A Journal devoted to the illustration of Things as they are,
with stray hints of Things as they ought to be. Illustrated.
Weekly numbers. Price 3d. First published by G. J. Keet,
Arcade. Second published by G. B. Horridge & Co., 1,

Sweeting Street. 1847. Liverpool Financial Reform Association Tracts commenced. 1848. Jones. Published fortnightly. Price 2d. Afterwards called The

Liverpool Charivari.

Pr. Doran and Lerry, &c. 1849. The Roscoe Magazine, and Lancashire and Cheshire Literary

Reporter. Six monthly numbers. E. Howell, Church Street,

Pr. E. Matthews, 35, South John Street. 1850. The Original. A Periodical established by a few young men, as

an Amusement for their Leisure hours. Pr. Albion Office.

GUIDES.

1784. A Familiar Medical Survey of Liverpool, Situation of the Town,

the Qualities and Influence of the Air, &c. By W. Moss,

Surgeon, Liverpool.

Pr. R. Hodgson. 1795. Wallace's General and Descriptive History of the Ancient and

Present State of the Town of Liverpool.

Pr, McCreery & Phillips. 1796. The Liverpool Guide; including a Sketch of the Environs: with

a Map of the Town. Sold by Crane & Jones, Castle Street. 1797. The Liverpool Guide; including a Sketch of the Environs: with

a Map. By W. Moss. Second Edition, enlarged. Pr. T. Swarbreck,

1799. The Liverpool Guide; including a Sketch of the Environs: with

a Map of the Town; and Directions for Sea-bathing. By

W. Moss. Third Edition, enlarged.

Pr. J. McCreery. 1801. The Liverpool Guide; including a Sketch of the Environs: with

a Map; and Directions for Sea-bathing. By W. Moss.

Fourth Edition, enlarged.

Pr. J. McCreery. 1805. The Picture of Liverpool; or, Stranger's Guide: with a Plan of

the Town.

Pr. W. Jones, at the Chronicle Office. 1807. The Stranger in Liverpool; or, an Historical and Descriptive

View of Liverpool and its Environs: with a Map. Illus

trated. First Edition.

Pr. by and for Thomas Kaye, 1807. 1808. The Picture of Liverpool ; or, Stranger's Guide. A New Edition,

considerably enlarged. Embellished with Engravings on

Wood by the first Artists : with a Map.

Pr. Jones & Wright, Swift's court. 1810. The Stranger in Liverpool; &c. The Second Edition, with cor

rections and additions. With Illustrations and a Map: with an Epitome of the History of Liverpool—the first of the

Annals.

Pr. Thomas Kaye. 1812. The Stranger in Liverpool ; &c. The Third Edition, with cor

rections and additions. With Illustrations and a Map.

Pr. Thomas Kaye. 1814. The Stranger in Liverpool; &c. Fourth Edition.

Pr. Thomas Kaye. 1816. The Stranger in Liverpool ; &c. The Fifth Edition : with a

Map, and a large collection of Engraved Views at the end.

Pr. Thomas Kaye. 1820. The Stranger in Liverpool; &c. The Sixth Edition. A New

Plan of the Town. One edition illustrations interspersed; another with a number at the end. An Appendix of the

Family of Edward Moore (1667) first introduced. 1823. The Stranger in Liverpool; &c. The Seventh Edition. A new

plan from the Sixth Edition. First entry as the Annals of

Liverpool. Large number of Illustrations at the end.
Pr. Thomas Kaye.

1825. The Stranger in Liverpool ; &c. The Eighth Edition. Map

same as the Seventh Edition. An Import and Export

Chart added. 1829. The Stranger in Liverpool ; &c. The Ninth Edition, with cor

rections and copious additions. Profusely illustrated, with

an appendix, from the Ancient Town Records &c. &c.

Pr. T. Kaye. 1833. The Stranger in Liverpool ; &c. The Tenth Edition. A New

Map. Illustrated by small views. 1834. The Picture of Liverpool ; or Stranger's Guide. A New and

correct Map of the Town.

Pr. and Pub. Thomas Taylor. 1836. The Stranger in Liverpool ; &c. Eleventh Edition.

Pr. Thomas Kaye.

Cornish's Stranger's Guide. First Edition. Pub. 37, Lord Street. 1839. The Stranger in Liverpool ; &c. Twelfth Edition. A New Map,

much enlarged. Illustrations many and finer.

Pr. T. Kaye. 1840. The Stranger in Liverpool ; &c. Twelfth Edition.

Pr. T. Kaye. 1841. The Stranger in Liverpool ; &c. Twelfth Edition. A New Map,

numerous illustrations.

Pr. T. Kaye. 1842. Smith's Stranger's Guide to Liverpool. By Alexander Brown.

Illustrated. 1843. The Picturesque Hand-book to Liverpool ; being an improved

Edition of the Stranger's Pocket Book. Fourth Thousand.
A new and accurate Plan of the Town. Wareing Webb,

Castle Street. 1843. Smith's Stranger's Guide to Liverpool. By Alex. Brown, A.M.

With Illustrations and a Map of Town, Price 4s. With Plan

and two Engravings, Price 2s.

Published by Benj. Smith, South Castle Street. 1844. The Stranger's Pocket Guide through Liverpool. Second Edition.

A Plan of the Town.
Published by Benj. Smith, South Castle Street.
Pictorial Liverpool. Illustrated by Engravings, Woodcuts, and

Lithographic Drawings, fifty in number. New Outline

Map. By James Stonehouse.
Published by Henry Lacey, Bold Street.

A New and complete Hand-book for the Stranger in Liverpool.

A New Outline Map. A New Edition. No Illustrations.

By James Stonehouse.

Published by Henry Lacey. 1846. Brown's Threepenny Guide through Liverpool. For Cheap

Trains. An Engraved Map. By James Stonehouse.
Pr. and Pub. by John Brown, Dansie Street.
The Picturesque Hand-book of Liverpool; with a day at Birken-

head. A Map of the Town, and above One Hundred

Engravings. Fifth Edition. By H. M. Addey.

Published by Benj. Smith, South Castle Street. 1850. The Stranger in Liverpool. By Thomas Kaye. Re-issue.

Twelfth Edition.

THE LAKELAND OF LANCASHIRE.

No. I.-HAWKSHEAD Town, CHURCH AND School.

By A. Craig Gibson, F.S.A.

READ 2ND MARCH, 1865.

The English Lakes are commonly spoken of as of Cumberland or Westmoreland; and comparatively few amongst the crowds that flock thither every season make themselves aware of the fact that a considerable portion of what is popularly called the Lake District-a portion, too, containing every variety of scenery that may be imagined as ranging between the most savage and sterile grandeur and the softest and most luxuriant beauty-lies within the boundaries of Lancashire, the county whose name, perhaps beyond any other, suggests ideas widely apart from anything associated in our thoughts with the worship of the sublime and beautiful in nature.

The queen of our lakes, Windermere, is bounded on twothirds of its circumference by a Lancashire shore. The smaller lake of Esthwaite, whose chief attractions are the irregularity of outline, formed by its green peninsular hillocks and its general air of placid beauty and repose, is entirely in Lancashire. Entirely in Lancashire, too, is Coniston Water, around the head of which are concentrated and combined, as I devoutly believe, more of the true elements of natural beauty than may be found within the same limited bounds in any other part of the world.

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