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Francs. Six months of the annual reimbursement stipulated at Miramar.. 12,500,000 On account of the Vera Cruz railroad........................ 1,500,000 Proceeds of the sale of 47,625 Mexican imperial bonds.......... 14, 287,000

(NOTE.—There still remain in the portfolio of the treasury 5,232 bonds.] Arrears on amount of bonds....

5, 400,000

Total in 1864........

................ 33, 687, 009 RECEIPTS IN 1865.

Annual reimbursement stipulated at Miramar...... 25,000,000
Arrears, &c.................................. 2,700,000

- 27,700,000 RECEIPTS IN 1867. Drawn from Mexican customs..

588.000

Total receipts........

61, 975,000

According to this statement the excess of outlay over receipts will amount to 301,190,000 francs, without taking into account the portion of the 31,713,000 francs, extraordinary expenses, which belongs to the Mexican account, estimated at 13,000,000 francs. We must also add the loss of materiel, which, up to 1864, amounted to 22,500,000 francs, and the expense of bringing home the expeditionary corps, about 20,000,000 francs. Commenting on these figures the Courrier Français asks, “ Where is the capital of French subjects—sunk in that expedition, or confiscated and lost in cousequence of its failure ?" This is what tables of the budget, however exact they may be, can never tell us, but which are calculated at something over 250,000,000 francs; and what makes tas momentarily expect to see broken-down merchants, who were well off and happy until our intervention, and to whom our victories have brought nothing save run and the gloomy recollection of their past prosperity.

Statement of the material work accomplished by the Mexican Legation in Washington from August 15, 1860, to December 31, 186.

Correspondence with the Department of State of Mexico.

Correspondence with the Depart:nent of State

of the United States.

Correspondence with the

cousulates of Mexico in
the United States, Mex-
ican legations abroad,
departments of the Mex.
ican government, and
other othcials of Mexico.

Private letters on official

and other subjects.

From the legation.

From the State Department of

Mexico.

From the legation.

From the State
Department of
Washington.

From the
legation.

To the lega

tion,

From the
legation,

To the lega.

tion.

Year.

Number of let.

ters.

Number of let.

ters.

Nuinber of let.

ters.

Number of

letters.

Confidential.

Enclosures.

Confidential.

Official.

Number of letters and

enclosures.

Printed pages.

Number of letters and

enclosures.

Total.

Enclosures.

Number of letters.

Official.

Total.

Number of letters.

Pages.

Enclosures.

Total.

Total.

Official.

Pages.

Enclosures.

Total.

Pages.

Official.

Total.

Pages.

Pages.

Pages.

Pages.

Pages.

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Total../ 3,031 56 3,087 3, 536 6,643 23, 791 1, 620 65 1,685 220 1,905 4,834 476 1,244 1,720 8,948 2,572 354 129 483 721 1,301 1,729 1,379 1,951 7, 130 14, 920 7, 405 16,678

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This correspondence is contained in 45 bound large volumes, as follows: Correspondence to the State De partment of Mexico, 24 volumes; from that department, 5; to the State Department at Washington, 7: from the Washington State Department, 2; to and from different Mexican officials, 3; and private letters received

The year 1860 can be taken as an average of the ordinary work of the legation in normal times Darings the time embraced in the preceding statement Mr. Romero has been at the head of the Mexican legation. He arrived in Washington on the 24th of December, 1859, as secretary of legation, José M. Mata being then the minister. On the 14th of August, 1860, Mr. Mater left New York for Vera Cruz, acerediting Mr. Rotero chargé d'affaires ad interim to the State Department. Mr. Romero presented his letters of credence on the lock to Mr. William Henry Trescott, Assistant Secretary of State, then Acting Secretary. On the oth of May. 1862, Mr. Romero presented bis credentials to the Department of State as chargé d'affaires near the goverment of the United States, they being signed by General Doblado, minister of foreign affairs of Mexica a the 3d of April. On the 23d of April, 1863, Mr. Romero noti ed Mr. Seward that he had received a lease of absence of which he would avail himself. He took leave o President Lincoln on the 27th; left Washington the next day, and New York on the 16th of May following.

Mr. Romero returned to New York on the 23d of October, 1863, as envoy extraordinary and minister pleci potentiary from Mexico to the United States, and presented his credentials to President Lincoln on the 28th of The same month, having since remained in Washington in that character.

Out of 2, 155 days that Mr. Romero has been in the United States (counting five full years, 139 days in 1 and 190 in 1863) he has only spent out of Washington, and always on official business, 306 days, 22 follom: in 1860, 6; in 1861, 31; in 1862, 36; in 1863, 29; in 1864, 96; in 1865, 89; and in 1866, 19; baring passed ba Washington 1,849 days.

While Mr. Romero was acting as chargé d'affaires he only had one attaché to the legation : Mr. Maries Degollado first, and Mr. J. Escobar y Armendariz afterwards. He was at some intervals alone. Since be returned as full minister he has had two or three assistants, Mr. Mariscal having been during all that time the secretary of legation.

The total number of official interviews which Mr. Romero had with the Secretary of State. the Ha William H. Seward, from the 2d of September, 1861, to the 31st of December, 1866, is 103, as follows: chargé d'affaires, (to the 23d of May, 1863,) 63; as minister, (from the 27th of October, 1862.) 46; and the President of the United States on official business, as follows: with President Buchanan, 3; with Pres dent Lincoln, 15; with President Johnson, 8. Total, 135.

During the two years and a half that the republican government of Mexico was in the State of Chimales their communication with the republic and the outer world was entirely cut off, and they depepded upea their legation at Washington to hear from the central, southern, and eastern parts of Mexico, from the United States and Europe. All the mails for the Mexican government, including newspapers for President Juarez and a cabinet, had to be sent to Mr. Romero, the duties of the legation increasing thereby considerably, so it u necessary to keep an active correspondence with several Mexican generals in the field, and with friends of Mexico in France and other places in Europe and South America. Besides this, and the regular functies of a minister, Mr. Romero has been charged with the purchase of arms and munitions of war, the charteries of steamers to carry to Mexico the war material, the printing of Mexican bonds, and the Degotiation of them in the market, and the making of contracts for several other purposes, the circulation of the official papere the Mexican government, &c., &c.

The appreciation by the United States government of Mr. Romero's correspondence is shown by the fact that Congress has often asked the President, in a special manner, for Mr. Romero's letters, and the President bas sent out of 489 letters, which Mr. Romero has addressed to the State Department, 371, in the followine manner: of 1861, 27; 1862, 35; 1863, 21; 1864, 54; 1865, 115; 1866, 119. Total number of enclosures sent tə Congress and published, 1,204.

The total number of messages on Mexican affairs sent by the President to Congress during the tirse en braced in the preceding statement is 27, as follows: in 1862, 3; in 1863, 4; in 1864, 1; in 1865, 3; and ta 1866, 16.

EULALIO DEGOLLADO, JE,

Private Seretary. WASHINGTON, February 24, 1867

Mr. Chase to Mr. F. W. Seward.

[Unofficial.]
United States CONSULATE General,

Tampico, July 17, 1866. Sir: Believing that any information in relation to the critical state of the affairs of this country will be of some interest to our government at the present moment, I have the honor to acquaint you that, in addition to a force of 700 liberals besieging this place on its west side, about 500 more have just arrived at Tampico; also from the towns in the Huasteca, where they await a chief and re-enforcements to co-operate with those first above mentioned in the capture of Tampico.

By very late letters from Mexico and Vera Cruz I am credibly informed that Bazaine has assured Maximilian that there was no remedy for him but to abdicate, and suggested Santa Anna as the best person in whose favor to abdicate; to which Maximilian replied, on no account; but that in the case of abdicating he should do so in favor of Juarez. Such a course on the part of the retiring emperor would be a severe rebuke to the Emperor of France, but nothing more than an act of justice to the meritorious and patriotic President Juarez. The name of Santa Anna has become so distasteful to the people of this country that his former friends and supporters now deem his return here in any capacity a national calamity.

The news of the intended departure of the empress from this country, and to embark from Vera Cruz on the 13th instant, and the probable departure of the emperor at the same time, has reached here and caused much excitement and ill-feeling against the French, and when an attack is made on this place I am fearful that but little or no mercy will be shown them.

The garrison of Tampico is defended with 180 French soldiers, 50 Americans from General Mejia's late command at Matamoras, and 350 Mexicans. One of the Americans lately told me that he and his companions are stationed at the ar-, tillery.and as soon as the liberals attacked the military lines they would spike the guns and, with the 350 Mexicans, join the liberals. It seems that the Americans who have served in the imperial cause have received no pay; hence they await the first opportunity to wreak their vengeance upon the party who has deceived them.

All the funds of the municipality have been expended or squandered, and the members of that body are endeavoring to hypothecate the public edifices to obtain funds for current expenses. I am, sir, with great respect, your most obedient servant,

FRANKLIN CHASE. Hon. Frederick W. Seward,

Assistant Secretary of State, Washington.

[Notice.— Translation.]
LEGATION OF FRANCE To Mexico,

Mexico, January 8, 1867. The Emperor Napoleon has decided that the French residents who would wish to leave Mexico should be returned to their country at the same time as the expeditionary corps. Those persons whose intention it is to avail of this favor are requested to make it known as soon as possible at the office of the legation, Angel street, No. 7.

Mr. Chase to Mr. Seward. No. 54.]

United States CONSULATE GENERAL,

Tampico, January 17, 1867. Sir: I have the honor to report that on the 17th instant the notorious Colonel Canales, late in command of Matamoras, arrived in this city with a few adherents to the cause of Ortega, and that an attempt has been made through his suggestion to put this port under a contribution of three hundred and twenty thousand dollars, to be paid by semi-monthly instalments of forty thousand dollars.

For the object of raising the above-mentioned sum the merchants have been summoned before the principal commandant, and ordered to take immediate measures to comply with the terms of payment as aforesaid, but they have shown the impossibility of raising that enormous sum, while the previous forced loaas levied upon them are not paid.

The question is still pending, and it is impossible to form a correct opinion as to the final result.

An officer who belongs to the staff of Canales assures me that Ortega is now between this port and San Luis Potosi, and if funds can be raised in this place a formal “ pronunciamiento” will be made here in favor of Ortega as President of the republic.

Unless some of our ships of war touch here, it will be a long time before I shall have another opportunity for the transmission of letters to the United States, but I will avail of every means to report to you as early as possible the result of this unwelcome party.

I have the honor to be, sir, with great esteem and respect, your most obedi. ent servant,

FRANKLIN CHASE. Hon. William H. SEWARD,

Secretary of State, Washington, D. C.

No. 3.

Mr. Murphy to the minister of Mexico in France.

[Translation. ]

DEPATMENT OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS AND THE MARINE-CIVIL SECTION, NO. 21.

Remonstrance against the French authorities on account of incidents that oc

curred between the 15th instant and this date.

Mexico, January 29, 1867. SIR: The annexed documents will give you the correspondence between his majesty's government and the representatives of his Majesty the Emperor of the French at this court, on account of the following occurrences :

On the night of the 15th instant Mr. Marquez, general-in-chief of the second army corps, had the brothers Pedro, and Eduardo Garay arrested, on good suspicions of being rebel agents.

On the 16th General Ugarte, chief of the police, received a note (No. 1) from the French General A. de Maussion, commander of the subdivision of Mexico, summoning him to appear at his house at 3 o'clock that evening. Mr. Ugarte went, was arrested and informed that he would not be released till Pedro Garay was set at liberty. Mr. Ugarte was told that Pedro Garay had a safe-conduct

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