Lawyers Against Labor: From Individual Rights to Corporate Liberalism

Přední strana obálky
University of Illinois Press, 1995 - Počet stran: 334
A major revision of the history of labor law in the United States in the early twentieth century, "Lawyers against Labor" goes beyond legal issues to consider cultural, political, and industrial history as well. In the first full treatment of the turn-of-the-century American Anti-Boycott Association(AABA), Daniel Ernst ably leads the reader through a compelling story of business and politics.

The AABA was an organization of small- to medium-sized employers whose staff litigated and lobbied against organized labor. Ernst captures in depth the characters involved, bringing them to life with a writer's eye and a touch of wit. As he examines the AABA at work to combat trade unions through the courts, he introduces its most notable leaders, Daniel Davenport and Walter Gordon Merritt - who personified the opposing points of view - and shows how pluralism had won itself a place in the legal, academic, political, corporate, and even trade-union worlds long before the New Deal.

 

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Obsah

Origins
11
Davenport
24
A Liberty League
49
From Conspiracy to Tort
69
The Labor Trust
90
The Liberty of the Trader
110
The Politics of Law
124
Labor Incorporated
147
Magna Carta
165
The Woodtrim War
191
Merritt
214
Notes
237
Bibliography
289
Index
325
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