Obrázky stránek
PDF
ePub

An' b'o* Bear says, "What did you name her this time?" He said, "Oh, I named her Half-Gone." He said, "Half-Gone, that's a peculiar name!" So the third day he went back an'finished it. So b'o'Wolf said to b'o' Bear, "This was the last one she's goin" to have. Because it was the last one, I named it All-Gone." So the corn and potatoes was ripe in b'o' Bear's field, an' he was goin' to have a big supper. So they had a big time, Mis' Bear an' b'o' Bear fixin' for the supper. So they went to look for the butter, an' it was gone. So b'o' Bear he didn't know what to make of that. So he said to b'o' Fox, "Somebody takin' my butter, an' I'm goin' to give a party, an' after the party I'm goin' to have everybody sit in a row in the sun, an' the one that had taken the butter it will show on their mouth. An* brer Fox said, "I don't blame yer, brother Bear." So brer Bear gave a big party, an' he invited all his friends. He told them how he missed his butter. They all agreed with his plans. So, after the party was over, they all sat in a circle in the sun, an' the grease was all runnin* down brer Fox's mouth, an' all their eyes were turned to brother Fox. So brer Bear said to brer Fox, "I'll let you off this time, but next time I'll hang yer." So the party ended, an' they all went on their way.

IO. VOICE ABOVE.1

Brer Fox was goin' round makin' a lot of trouble. So he drove brother Bear's wife from home by goin' round makin' mischief on her. Said he seen her go down to the pond and flirt with brother Turtle. So after she had gone, it was too late for brother Bear, an' he was sorry. So they made up their minds to hang him. So brother Bear an* a lot of his friends got a rope an* hid behind some thickets. When brother Fox went by, they caught him an' take him to the church. So brer Fox said, "Please let me go say good-by to my wife an' children first." Brer Bear was the judge. He gave brer Fox five minutes. He went down to a large pond, an' he met his friend the stork. He sat down an' began to cry. The stork said, "What's the matter, friend of mine? Can I help you out any way?" Brother Fox said, "Oh, yes! they're goin' to hang me." He said, "You go on ahead of me, an' when they start to hang me, you git up in the ceilin', an' jus' say these words, 'Don't kill him, don't kill him!'" So the stork said "All right!" So he went to the church, and the bear was very glad to have him. The stork got in a corner by himself. They put brer Fox in the electric chair, an' was jus' gettin' ready to push the button, an' the stork flew up in the ceilin' an* begin to sing, "Don't kill him, don't kill him!" An' they all stopped an' listened; and brother Fox said, 'Listen! do you hear that?" An' brother Bear say, "Yes, what is it?" He said, "the Lord sendin' his angels down to tell yer not to kill me." So they all got scared an' left the church, an' left brother Fox in the 'lectric chair. An' when they had gone, brer Fox got way up in top of a big tree, an' he laughed an' laughed till he cried. He said, "O brer Bear! I got the best of you, after all." That's all.

1 Informant Ruth Holmes.

II. THE DISMEMBERED GHOST.1

Once there was a man, an' he wanted a place to lodge jus' fur the night, him an' his friends. So the man saw a little light 'tween the trees, an' he followed the light. It led him to a little house way back in the woods. It was an old man standin' in the door. The man says, "Say, Mister, have you got a place where I can lodge all night?" He says, "There's a little house back there, but it's haunted. If you can stay in it, all right." He says, "I can stay any place the Devil can stay." So he says, "Come on, fellers, we've got a good place!" So the man says, "We can have a nice game of cards here too." They all got around the table, an' had jus' finished a game of cards, when one man looked up, an' a pair of legs came down. He said, "Come on, let's go!" The other men said, "Let's stay here an' see what the end of it is." So they played a second game, an' a body came down. An'they kep'on playin', an'two arms came down. The other man says, "How much longer you goin' to stay here?" He said, "Don't be so scared! nothin' ain't goin' to bother you." He says, "I'm right here; if anything bothers you, it will bother me too." Then the head come down. The man that was standin' in the middle of the floor said, "Well, what are yer doin' playin' cards in my house?" So they all got up from the table, lef everything they had, an' ran to the man's house. The man says, "What's the matter, fellers?" The men say, "We can't stay in that place." The man says, "Well, you said you could live anywhere the Devil was." They say, "I know, but I can't live there." That's all.

1 Informant Ruth Holmes. Sec this number, p. 195.

RING-GAMES FROM GEORGIA.

BY LORAINE DARBY.

I SAw in southern Georgia a number of ring-games which I believe are peculiar to the colored children of that region. One of the prettiest is “The May-Pole Song.” One girl skips about inside the ring, and at the singing of the fourth line bows to the one she chooses. Then both “jump for joy,” a peculiar step rather like a clog, which outsiders find very difficult to learn. Then the song is repeated, the second girl choosing; and so on.

All around the May-pole,
The May-pole, the May-pole,
All around the May-pole,
Now, Miss Sallie, won't you bow?
Now, Miss Sallie, won't you jump for joy,
Jump for joy, jump for joy?
Now, Miss Sallie, won't you jump for joy?
Now, Miss Sallie, won't you bow?

A game which is most amusing to watch is “Good Old Egg-Bread.” The leader shouts one line, and the others answer with the next. The rhythm is very strong, and they stamp their feet most energetically as they circle.

[ocr errors]
[graphic]
[ocr errors]

Similar to this is "'Way Down Yonder."

Way down yonder

Soup to soup!
Where dem white folks

Soup to soup!
Just singin' an' prayin'

Soup to soup!
Try in' to make man

Soup to soup!
Biscuits hot

Soup to soup!
Corn-bread cold

Soup to soup!
Thank God Almighty

Soup to soup!
Just give me a little mo'

Soup to soup!

In "Old Green Field," too, the leader and the ring sing alternately. One inside chooses, and the action follows the words.

Old green field,

Rock to your love!
Old green field,

Rock to your love!
Tell me who you love!

Rock to your love!
Tell me who you love!

Rock to your love!

O Miss !your name is called.

Come, take a seat right beside your love!
Kiss her once and let her go.
Don't let her sit in this chair no mo'.
Old green field,

Rock to your love!
Old green field,

Rock to your love!

"Take Your Lover in the Ring" plainly dates from slavery times.

My old mistress promised me
Before she died she would set me free.
Take your lover in the ring.

I don't care!
Take your lover in the ring.

I don't care!

Now she's dead and gone to hell.
I hope that devil will burn her well!
Take your lover in the ring.

I don't care!
Take your lover in the ring.

I don't care!
It's a golden ring.

I don't care!

It's a silver ring.

I don't care!

In "High O" the action is very swift. A girl skips quickly once around inside the ring, chooses another, and takes her place.

In come another one,

High O!
A mighty pretty little one,

High O!
Then get about, go!

HighO!
Then get about, go!

High 0!

« PředchozíPokračovat »