Anecdotes, Observations, and Characters, of Books and Men

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J. R. Smith, 1858 - Počet stran: 396

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Strana 172 - THE Muse," disgusted at an age and clime Barren of every glorious theme, In distant lands now waits a better time, Producing subjects worthy fame ; — In happy climes, where, from the genial sun And virgin earth, such scenes ensue, The force of art by nature seems outdone, And fancied beauties by the true ; — In happy climes, the seat of innocence, Where nature guides and virtue rules ; Where men shall not impose, for truth and sense, The pedantry
Strana 192 - He used to encourage me much, and used to tell me, that there was one way left of excelling : for though we had several great poets, we never had any one great poet that was correct; and he desired me to make that my study and aim.
Strana 204 - That from their noyance he no where can rest, But with his clownish hands their tender wings He brusheth oft, and oft doth mar their murmurings.
Strana 19 - Wise men have said are wearisome; who reads Incessantly, and to his reading brings not A spirit and judgment equal or superior (And what he brings, what needs he elsewhere seek) Uncertain and unsettled still remains, Deep versed in books and shallow in himself, Crude or intoxicate, collecting toys, And trifles for choice matters, worth a sponge; As children gathering pebbles on the shore.
Strana 18 - I do not know what I may appear to the world, but to myself I seem to have been only like a boy playing on the sea-shore, and diverting myself in now and then finding a smoother pebble or a prettier shell than ordinary, whilst the great ocean of truth lay all undiscovered before me.
Strana 171 - I humbly entreat your excellency, either to use such persuasions as will keep one of the first men in this kingdom for learning and virtue quiet at home ; or assist him by your credit, to compass his romantic design ; which, however, is very noble and generous, and directly proper for a great person of your excellent education to encourage.
Strana 89 - I assured him, that I did not at all take it ill of Mr. Tickell that he was going to publish his translation ; that he certainly had as much right to translate any author as myself; and that publishing both was entering on a fair stage. I then added, that I would not desire him to look over my first book of the Iliad, because he bad looked over Mr.
Strana 158 - tis true — this truth you lovers know — In vain my structures rise, my gardens grow, In vain fair Thames reflects the double scenes Of hanging mountains, and of sloping greens: Joy lives not here; to happier seats it flies, And only dwells where Wortley casts her eyes.
Strana 209 - To answer your question as to Mr. Hughes ; what he wanted in genius, he made up as an honest man ; but he was of the class you think him.
Strana 261 - you have the honour of seeing the two greatest men in the world." — "I don't know how great men you may be," said the Guinea man, "but I don't like your looks. I have often bought a man much better than both of you, all muscles and bones, for ten guineas.

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