The Polish Revolution: Solidarity

Přední strana obálky
Yale University Press, 2002 - Počet stran: 439
"One of the most brilliant and illuminating interpreters of modern eastern Europe . . . a wonderfully vivid writer . . . He reaches the parts that others do not reach."--Richard Davy, The Times

"The best single account of what happened--and why."--Newsweek

The definitive account of Solidarity's spectacular rise and tragic fall . . . a book to set the record straight . . . amply documented, indispensable."--John Darnton, New York Times Book Review

A brilliant eyewitness and analyst, Timothy Garton Ash in this book offers a gripping account of the Polish shipyard workers who defied their communist rulers in 1980. He describes the emergence of the improbable leader Lech Walesa, the ensuing tumult that culminated in martial law, and--for this updated edition--the fate of the Solidarity movement in subsequent years.







 

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Obsah

Why Poland? Why Workers? Why 1980?
3
Inside the Lenin Shipyard Workers August 1980
41
A New Social Contract?
73
Inside the Rzeszów Commune The Peasants Revolt
117
The Ides of March
142
Democratic Communism?
175
What Partnership?
191
Noble Democracy
216
What Revolution?
287
Under Western Eyes
318
Postscript to the Third Edition
356
Chronology
382
Abbreviations
391
Notes
395
Bibliography
413
Supplementary Bibliography
417

Confrontation
244
War
273

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O autorovi (2002)

Timothy Garton Ash is a fellow of St. Antony's College, Oxford, and of the Hoover Institution, Stanford. He is the author of acclaimed works of contemporary history including The Uses of Adversity, The File: A Personal History, We the People, his personal account of the revolutions of 1989, which has been translated into fifteen languages, and, most recently, History of the Present.

Bibliografické údaje