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all questions which by this confederation are submitted to them. And the articles of this confederation shall be inviolably observed by every State, and the Union shall be perpetual; nor shall any alteration at any time hereafter be made in any of them; unless such alteration be agreed to in a Congress of the United States, and be afterwards confirmed by the Legislatures of every State.

And whereas it hath pleased the Great Governor of the World to incline the hearts of the Legislatures we respectively represent in Congress, to approve of, and to authorize us to ratify the said articles of confederation and perpetual union. Know ye that we the undersigned delegates, by virtue of the power and authority to us given for that purpose, do by these presents, in the name and in behalf of our respective constituents, fully and entirely ratify and confirm each and every of the said articles of confederation and perpetual union, and all and singular the matters and things therein contained: and we do further solemnly plight and engage the faith of our respective constituents, that they shall abide by the determinations of the United States in Congress assembled, on all questions, which by the said confederation are submitted to them. And that the articles thereof shall be inviolably observed by the States we respectively represent, and that the Union shall be perpetual.

In witness whereof we have hereunto set our hands in Congress. Done at Philadelphia in the State of Pennsylvania the ninth day of July in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and seventy-eight, and in the third year of the independence of America.

On the part & behalf of the State of New Hampshire
JOSIAH BARTLETT

JOHN WENTWORTH, Junr
August 8th, 1778

On the part and behalf of the State of Massachusetts Bay John HANCOCK

FRANCIS DANA SAMUEL ADAMS

JAMES LOVELL ELBRIDGE GERRY

SAMUEL HOLTEN

On the part and behalf of the State of Rhode Island and

Providence Plantations WILLIAM ELLERY

John COLLINS Henry MARCHANT

On the part and behalf of the State of Connecticut ROGER SHERMAN

Titus HOSMER SAMUEL HUNTINGTON ANDREW ADAMS OLIVER Wolcott

On the part and behalf of the State of New York
JAS. DUANE

Gouv. MORRIS
FRA. LEWIS

WM. DUER

On the part and in behalf of the State of New Jersey

Novr. 26, 1778 JNO. WITHERSPOON

Natal. SCUDDER

On the part and behalf of the State of Pennsylvania Robt. MORRIS

WILLIAM CLINGAN DANIEL ROBERDEAU

JOSEPH REED, 22d July, JNO. BAYARD SMITH

1778

On the part & behalf of the State of Delaware Thos. MÄKEAN, Feby. 12, John DICKINSON, May 5th, 1779

1779 Nicholas Van DYKE

On the part and behalf of the State of Maryland John Hanson, March 1, DANIEL CARROLL, Mar. I, 1781

1781

On the part and behalf of the State of Virginia

RICHARD HENRY LEE
JOHN BANISTER
THOMAS ADAMS

JNO. HARVIE
FRANCIS LIGHTFOOT LEE

On the part and behalf of the State of No. Carolina
John Penn, July 21, 1778 Jno. WILLIAMS
CORNS. HARNETT

On the part & behalf of the State of South Carolina

HENRY LAURENS
WILLIAM HENRY DRAYTON
JNO. MATTHEWS

RICHD. HUTSON
Thos. HEYWARD, Junr

On the part & behalf of the State of Georgia Edwd. TELFAIR

Edwd. LANGWORTHY JNO. WALTON, 24th July,

1778

D.

ANGWORTHY

ARTICLES OF CAPITULATION

YORKTOWN

(1781)

[The surrender of Cornwallis, arranged in these articles, virtually brought to a close the hostilities in the war between Great Britain and her American colonies, and assured the independence of the United States.)

Settled between his Excellency General Washington, Com

mander-in-chief of the combined Forces of America and France; his Excellency the Count de Rochambeau, Lieutenant-General of the Armies of the King of France, Great Cross of the royal and military Order of St. Louis, commanding the auxiliary Troops of his Most Christian Majesty in America; and his Excellency the Count de Grasse, Lieutenant-General of the Naval Armies of his Most Christian Majesty, Commander of the Order of St. Louis, Commander-in-Chief of the Naval Army of France in the Chesapeake, on the one Part; and the Right Honorable Earl Cornwallis, Lieutenant-General of his Britannic Majesty's Forces, commanding the Garrisons of York and Gloucester; and Thomas Symonds, Esquire, commanding his Britannic Majesty's Naval Forces in York River in Virginia, on the other Part.

RTICLE I. The garrisons of York and Gloucester, in

cluding the officers and seamen of his Britannic MajI I esty's ships, as well as other mariners, to surrender themselves prisoners of war to the combined forces of America and France. The land troops to remain prisoners to the United States, the navy to the naval army of his Most Christian Majesty. Granted.

ARTICLE II. The artillery, arms, accoutrements, military chest, and public stores of every denomination, shall be delivered unimpaired to the heads of departments appointed to receive them. Granted.

ARTICLE III. At twelve o'clock this day the two redoubts on the left flank of York to be delivered, the one to a detachment of American infantry, the other to a detachment of French grenadiers. Granted.

The garrison of York will march out to a place to be appointed in front of the posts, at two o'clock precisely, with shouldered arms, colors cased, and drums beating a British or German march. They are then to ground their arms, and return to their encampments, where they will remain until they are despatched to the places of their destination. Two works on the Gloucester side will be delivered at one o'clock to a detachment of French and American troops appointed to possess them. The garrison will march out at three o'clock in the afternoon; the cavalry with their swords drawn, trumpets sounding, and the infantry in the manner prescribed for the garrison of York. They are likewise to return to their encampments until they can be finally marched off.

ARTICLE IV. Officers are to retain their side-arms. Both officers and soldiers to keep their private property of every kind; and no part of their baggage or papers to be at any time subject to search or inspection. The baggage and papers of officers and soldiers taken during the siege to be likewise preserved for them. Granted.

It is understood that any property obviously belonging to the inhabitants of these States, in the possession of the garrison, shall be subject to be reclaimed.

ARTICLE V. The soldiers to be kept in Virginia, Maryland, or Pennsylvania, and as much by regiments as possible, and supplied with the same rations of provisions as are

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