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THE NIGHTINGALE AND GLOW

WORM.

WILLIAM COWPER.

A nightingale, that all day long
Had cheered the village with his song,
Nor yet at eve his note suspended,
Nor yet when eventide was ended,
Began to feel-as well he might-
The keen demands of appetite;
When, looking eagerly around,
He spied, far off, upon the ground,
A something shining in the dark,
And knew the glow-worm by his spark;
So, stooping down from hawthorn top,
He thought to put him in his crop.
The worm, aware of his intent,
Harangued him thus, quite eloquent,-
"Did you admire my lamp," quoth he,
"As much as I your minstrelsy,
You would abhor to do me wrong,
As much as I to spoil your song;
For 'twas the self-same Power divine
Taught you to sing, and me to shine;
That you with music, I with light,
Might beautify and cheer the night."

7

The songster heard his short oration,
And warbling out his approbation,
Released him, as my story tells,

And found a supper somewhere else.

SEVEN AGES OF MAN.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE.

(From "As You Like It.")
All the world's a stage,

And all the men and women merely players:
They have their exits and their entrances;
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.
Then the whining school-boy, with his satchel,
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woful ballad
Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths, and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honor, sudden and quick in quarrel,
Seeking the bubble reputation

Even in the cannon's mouth. And then the justice,

In fair round belly with good capon lined,
With eyes severe, and beard of formal cut,
Full of wise saws and modern instances;
And so he plays his part: the sixth age shifts
Into the lean and slippered pantaloon,
With spectacles on nose, and pouch on side;
His youthful hose, well saved, a world too wide
For his shrunk shank; and his big manly voice,
Turning again toward childish treble, pipes
And whistles in his sound. Last scene of all,
That ends this strange eventful history,
Is second childishness, and mere oblivion,-
Sans teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans everything.

"WHEN LOVELY WOMAN."

When lovely woman wants a favor,

And finds, too late, that man won't bend, What earthly circumstance can save her From disappointment in the end?

The only way to bring him over,
The last experiment to try,
Whether a husband or a lover,

If he have feeling, is, to cry!

THE PARTING OF ROMEO AND

JULIET.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE.

JULIET: Wilt thou be gone? it is not yet near

day:

It was the nightingale, and not the lark,
That pierced the fearful hollow of thine ear;
Nightly she sings on yon pomegranate tree:
Believe me, love, it was the nightingale.

ROMEO: It was the lark, the herald of the morn,

No nightingale: look, love, what envious streaks Do lace the severing clouds in yonder east: Night's candles are burnt out, and jocund day Stands tiptoe on the misty mountain tops.

I must be gone and live, or stay and die.

I:

JULIET: Yon light is not daylight, I know it, It is some meteor, that the sun exhales, To be to thee this night a torch-bearer, And light thee on thy way to Mantua: Therefore stay yet,-thou need'st not be gone. ROMEO: Let me be ta'en, let me be put to death;

I am content, so thou wilt have it so.

I'll say, yon gray is not the morning's eye, 'Tis but the pale reflex of Cynthia's brow;

Nor that is not the lark, whose notes do beat
The vaulty heaven so high above our heads:
I have more care to stay than will to go;—
Come, death, and welcome! Juliet wills it so.-
How is't, my soul! let's talk, it is not day.

JULIET: It is, it is, hie hence, be gone, away! It is the lark that sings so out of tune,

Straining harsh discords, and unpleasing sharps.
Some say, the lark makes sweet division;
This doth not so, for she divideth us:

Some say, the lark and loathed toad change eyes:
O, now I would they had changed voices too!
Since arm from arm that voice doth us affray,
Hunting thee hence, with hunts-up to the day.
O, now be gone; more light and light it grows.
ROMEO: More light and light,—more dark and
dark our woes.

JULIET: Then, window, let day in, and let life
out.

descend.

ROMEO: Farewell, farewell! one kiss, and I'll
(Descends.)
JULIET: Art thou gone so! my love! my lord!
my friend!

I must hear from thee every day i' the hour,
For in a minute there are many days:

Oh! by this count I shall be much in years,
Ere I again behold my
Romeo.

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