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How long after this separation we know not, this once gay and brilliant girl, "the light of Sudeley and Hampton Court," came to the gate of Sir Arthur Gorges—to make use of his own words—“in rags, her legs bare, her feet shoeless, her coarse petticoat clinging about her limbs, an old cloak on her beautiful head, begging of him to let her come in from the cold for Christian pity and love of his wife.”

Edward Ferrers, Esq., and his wife Catherine, were in possession of the lease in 1628 ; Richard Gosson in 1633. In 1638 the Dean and Chapter held a Court for themselves for this Manor. The next year, 1639, they leased the demesne to John Cartwright, Esq., for twentyone years; who, when the Church property was exposed for sale by the Parliament, purchased the estate, and Richard Streete, Esq., of London, bought the Manor and advowson. After the restoration of Charles II., the Dean and Chapter recovered their interest, and Mr. Cartwright, or his representatives, held it on lease as before (they held this lease till 1750, when Sir R. Hoare became lessee at £60 per annum).

In 1659 the house was advertised to be let by the description of “Barn Elms House, in Surrey, with orchards, gardens, coach-houses, stable, grazing for two geldings or cows, spring water, brought to the house in

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Mercurius Politicus,” 5th May, 1659.

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leaden pipes, pleasant walks by the Thames side, and other accommodation, to be let, or may be divided into two convenient dwellings with gardens, orchard and water to each of them; enquire further of Mr. Edward Marshall, a stone cutter, living in Fetter Lane."

The parish register of Barnes contains the following entry in connection with the singular individual who resided at Barn Elms during the Commonwealth :

August 23rd, 1672, buried Mr. Hiam." The real name of this man was Alrezer Coppe ; he was born at Warwick, 1619, and was a Post Master of Merton, Oxford.

After having been by turns Presbyterian and Anabaptist, he became one of the wildest enthusiasts of that fanatical period. He published several pamphlets with strange titles. One of them is dated London, 1648, "two or three days before the Eternal God thundered at the great St. Helens.” In 1650 he was committed to Newgate for publishing a work called “The Fiery Flying Scroll.” A copy of this book, which was burnt at Westminster and Coventry, is preserved amongst the collection of pamphlets in the British Museum. Its author seems, however, to have been a more fitting subject for Bedlam than Newgate. After having 1 Account of the Life of Abraham Cowley.

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