Obrázky stránek
PDF
ePub

NORWICH, CONN. Item 9, Norwich, Conn.: Total estimated Federal cost, $1,044,000, allotments to date, $724,000; tentative allocation, 1949, $320,000 to complete the project.

(The justification is as follows:) Item No. 9. Norwich, Conn.: Total estimated Federal cost..

$1, 044, 000 Allotments to date.

724, 000 Tentative allocation fiscal year 1949.

320, 000 Additional to complete after fiscal year 1949. Authorization.--1941 Flood Control Act.

Location and description. The project consists of a channel improvement on the Shetucket River immediately upstream from its confluence with the Yantic River at Norwich, Conn., which provides for the deepening and widening of a ledge rock constriction in the channel.

Operations, fiscal year 1948.-Construction of this project is under way and was approximately 5-percent complete on June 30, 1947. Channel excavation in rock is about 35-percent complete and will continue during fiscal year 1948. The expenditure of available funds will carry the project from 5 to 70 percent completion at the end of fiscal year 1948.

Proposed operations, fiscal year 1949.-Funds are needed in fiscal year 1949 to complete the project. The allocation of $320,000 for fiscal year 1949 will be applied as follows: $320,000 to completion of rock excavation and to final parments under the existing contract. Expenditure of this amount will complete the project.

Justification.—This project is an integral unit of the comprehensive plan for protection against flood damage in the Thames River Basin and in particular to the city of Norwich. The city has sustained severe damages from previous floods and the project in conjunction with the system of authorized reservoirs will provide adequate protection. Norwich suffered damages of $1,900,000 during the flood of 1938. Further damages from floods of major magnitudes will be eliminated by the completion of this project and the reservoir system.

EAST SIDNEY RESERVOIR, N. Y.

Mr. ENGEL. Item 10, East Sidney Reservoir, N. Y.: Total estimated Federal cost, $6,601,500; allotments to date, $2,999,200; tentative allocation, 1949, $3,602,300, which will complete the project.

(The justification is as follows:) Item No. 10. East Sidney Reservoir, N. Y.: Total estimated Federal cost..

$6, 601, 500 Allotments to date.

12, 999, 200 Tentative allocation fiscal year 1949.

3, 602, 300 Additional to complete after fiscal year 1949. 1 Includes 1948 appropriation of $900,000. Authorization.—1936 Flood Control Act.

Location and description.-The project consists of a concrete dam located on Ouleout Creek near East Sidney, N. Y., about 4 miles above the confluence of the creek and the Susquehanna River and about 75 miles above Binghamton, N. Y.

Operations, fiscal year 1948.Construction of the dam was initiated during April 1947 under a continuing contract and an old-existing dam on the reservoir site has been removed; the construction of a relocated State highway has been completed; construction of the earth-dike section is about 70 percent completed: and excavation for the main dam is almost complete. During the fiscal year 1948, utility relocations will be completed, the outlet works will be partly completed, and placement of concrete in the dam and spillway will be started. The procurement of gates and operating equipment necessary for the operation of the dam will also be substantially completed during the fiscal year 1948 under separate contract. The project is expected to be about 45 percent complete by June 30, 1948.

Proposed operations, fiscal year 1949.Funds are needed in the fiscal year 1949 for the completion of the project, including continuing contracts now in force.

The allocation of $3,602,300 will be applied as follows: $3,306,400 to the completion of construction of the concrete dam, spillway, and appurtenant works; $255,900 to the completion of procurement of Government-furnished cement; and $10,000 for completion of payments for reservoir lands.

Justification. The project is an integral unit of the southern New York floodcontrol project, a comprehensive plan for the control of floods in southern New York. It will primarily afford flood protection to the city of Binghamton, N. Y., and will also afford substantial reductions in recurring flood damages to the communities of Cnadilla, Sidney, and Endicott, N. Y., as well as to agricultural lands and small villages downstream to Pennsylvania. The project, being an integral part of the system of flood protection for Binghamton and other damage centers, is needed to provide a degree of control of the upper Susquehanna River and thus augment, as planned, the local flood-protection structures at Binghamton already constructed by the Federal Government at a cost of $3,000,000. Overtopping of these structures would result in inestimable damages not only to the structures but to the city and its populace. The average annual flood-control benefits of the authorized comprehensive plan for flood control in southern New York, of which the East Sidney Reservoir is an integral part, are estimated to be over $3,000,000.

Vr. EYGEL. Where is that located?

General WHEELER. In southern New York, on a tributary of the Susquehanna River upstream from Binghamton.

Vir. Evgel. How much have you spent there?

Colonel FERINGA. Last year we got $900,000, and the work is now under way.

Mr. CASE. Is not the percentage of the total costs that you are requesting here somewhat higher than customary for projects of this size? On some projects under $1,000,000 you have been asking for the total sum, but here you are asking for an amount which is about 60 percent of the total cost of the project, and if the project was running over $6,000,000—

Colonel FERINGA (interposing). It is based upon the work that is being completed during the next fiscal year. You see this is January 1948, and this proposed amount is for the fiscal year 1949; it is the money which is needed to complete the project. It would cost more if we were not to carry on in this manner. If we slow down construction, it will result in an extra cost.

Vir. CASE. How does it come that with $3,000,000 already allocated for this project that you are asking for money to complete; is it for payment for land for the reservoir and also land for the dam?

Colonel FERINGA. We must get the land on which the dam is built, but the balance of the reservoir land we purchase and obtain as the construction goes ahead. The land acquisition goes right along during construction.

Mr. Case. This is largely for the protection of the city of Binghamton, is it not?

Colonel FERINGA. Yes; for Binghamton and several other towns along the Susquehanna River in southern New York.

Mr. CASE. What contribution is being made by Binghamton?

Colonel FERINGA. Binghamton has a local protection project for which the city furnished the land and rights-of-way.

Mr. CASE. This local protection project works in with the Federal project.

Colonel FERINGA. Yes, sir.
Mr. Case. How much did Binghamton put up?

Colonel FERINGA. The lands and other items of local expense cost about $625,000.

Mr. Case. What is the total cost of the local protection project?

Colonel FERINGA, I will have to insert that in the record.
(The following was submitted later:)
The Federal cost of the Binghamton local protection project is $2,804,100.

WHITNEY POINT RESERVOIR, N. Y.

Mr. ENGEL. Item No. 11, Whitney Point Reservoir, N. Y.: Total estimated Federal cost, $5,140,900; allotments to date, $4,807,800; tentative allocation, 1949, $57,700, which will be applied to the payment of the State of New York for existing rights-of-way; is that right?

Colonel FERINGA. Yes, sir.

(The justification is as follows:) Item No. 11. Whitney Point Reservoir, N. Y.: Total estimated Federal cost..

$5, 140, 900 Allotments to date...

4, 807, 800 Tentative allocation, fiscal year 1949.

57, 700 Additional to complete after fiscal year 1949

275, 400 Authorization.—1936 Flood Control Act.

Location and description.The project consists of a rolled earth-fill dam on the Otselic River near Whitney Point, N. Y., about three-fourths mile above the confluence of the Otselic and Tioughnioga Rivers and about 23 miles above Binghamton, N. Y.

Operations, fiscal year 1948.Construction of the dam and appurtenant works was completed in June 1942. No work will be undertaken on the project during the fiscal year 1948 except for continued payments for lands acquired in connection with the project. The project as a whole will be carried to 94 percent completion.

Proposed operations, fiscal year 1949.-Funds are needed in the fiscal year 1949 to continue payments for reservoir lands. The allocation of $57,700 will be applied for reimbursement to the State of New York for lands, easements, and rights-of-way. With the expenditure of these funds all work in connection with this project unit will be about 97 percent completed by the end of the fiscal year 1949.

Justification. The project is an integral unit of the southern New York floodcontrol project, a comprehensive plan for the control of floods in southern New York. It primarily affords flood protection for the industrial city of Binghamton, N. Y., and affords substantial reductions in recurring flood damages to the communities of Whitney Point and Endicott, N. Y., as well as other smaller villages and agricultural lands downstream to Pennsylvania. The average annual floodcontrol benefits of the authorized comprehensive plan for flood control in southern New York, of which the Whitney Point Reservoir is an integral part, are estimated to be over $3,000,000.

ALMOND RESERVOIR, N. Y. Mr. Engel. Item No. 12, Almond Reservoir, N. Y.: Total estimated Federal cost, $5,878,000; allotments to date, $4,069,800; tentative allocation, 1949, $1,808,200 to complete the project.

(The justification is as follow:) Item No. 12. Almond Reservoir, N. Y.: Total estimated Federal cost...

$5, 878, 000 Allotments to date...

14, 069, 800 Tentative allocation, fiscal year 1949..

1, 808, 200 Additional to complete after fiscal year 1949. 1 Includes 1948 appropriation of $1,600,000 Authorization.--1936 Flood Control Act.

Location and description. --The project consists of a rolled earth-fill dam on Canacadea Creek, about 242 miles above the confluence of the Canacadea Creek and the Canisteo River and about 2 miles above the city of Hornell, N. Y.

Operations, fiscal year 1948.-Construction of the project was commenced in August 1946 under continuing contract. To date the excavation of the tunnel

for the outlet has been completed and concreting is now under way. Grading for the highway and railroad relocations is nearly complete and excavation of the spillway is well under way. During the fiscal year 1948 the railroad and utility relocations will be completed and the highway relocation will be finished except for final paving. The outlet works will be substantially completed and construction of main embankment considerably advanced. It is expected that construction under the prime contract will be 75 percent complete by June 30, 1948. In addition, the procurement of gates and operating equipment under separate contract will be 100 percent completed.

Proposed operations, fiscal year 1949.-Funds are needed in the fiscal year 1949 for completion of the project. The allocation of $1,808,200 will be applied as follows: $1,677,500 to the completion of the construction of the dam, spillway, and appurtenant works; $85,700 to complete reimbursement to the State of New York for costs in connection with the highway relocation; and $45,000 to complete payments for reservoir lands. At the end of the fiscal year 1949 the entire project will be completed.

Justification.--The project is an essential unit of the southern New York control project, a comprehensive plan for the control of floods in southern New York. Primarily it will afford flood protection to the industrial and railroad center of Hornell, N. Y., which suffered a $7,811,900 flood loss during the 1935 flood. In addition, substantial flood benefits will be afforded to the cities of Elmira and Corning and the villages of Canisteo and Addison, N. Y., as well as agricultural lands bordering the Canisteo and Chemung Rivers to Athens, Pa. The completed project, together with the completed Arkport Reservoir and the local flood structures at Hornell; N. Y., will substantially remove the annual flood losses at Homell. The average annual flood-control benefits of the authorized comprebensive plan for flood control in southern New York, of which the Almond Reservoir is an integral part, are estimated to be over $3,000,000.

ALMOND, N. Y.

Mr. ENGEL. Item No. 14, Almond, N. Y., which is another Almond project: Total estimated Federal cost, $206,800; allotments to date, $92,900; tentative allocation, 1949, $113,900 to complete the project. This is a separate project from the previous one?

Colonel FERINGA. Yes; it is a separate project; the first is a reservoir upstream from the town of Almond. The project for Almond village is a levee and channel improvement project.

Vr. ENGEL. No. 14 is a flood wall?
Colonel FERINGA. No, sir; a levee and channel project.

(The justification is as follows:)
Item No. 14. Almond, N. Y.:
Total estimated Federal cost-

$206, 800 Allotments to date...

92, 900 Tentative allocation, fiscal year 1949.

113, 900 Additional to complete after fiscal year 1949. Authorization.-1936 Flood Control Act.

Location and description. The project consists of earth levees along Canacadea and McHenry Valley Creeks and channel improvement of Canacadea Creek in the village of Almond (Allegheny and Steuben Counties), N. Y.

Operations, fiscal year 1948.--Plans for the project have been completed and construction will be initiated during fiscal year 1948. The project will be about 35 percent completed June 30, 1948.

Proposed operations, fiscal year 1949.-Funds are needed in the fiscal year 1949 for completion of construction of the project. The allocation of $113,900 will be applied to the completion of construction of the earth levees and channel improvements. With the expenditure of the funds allocated for the fiscal year 1949 the project will be carried from 35 percent completion to 100 percent completion by the end of the fiscal year 1949.

Justification.- The project will provide flood protection for the village of Almond against a flood of the magnitude of the maximum flood of record, which occurred in July 1935. The average annual flood-control benefits of the authorized comprehensive plan for flood control in southern New York, of which the

Almond Village local protection project is an integral part, are estimated to be over $3,000,000.

ELMIRA, N. Y. Mr. ENGEL. Item 13, Elmira, N. Y.: Total estimated cost, $6,102,100; allotments to date, $4,568,900; tentative allocation, 1949, $1,175,200; additional to complete after 1949, $358,000.

(The justification is as follows:) Item No. 13. Elmira, N. Y.: Total estimated Federal cost..

$6, 102, 100 Allotments to date..

14, 568, 900 Tentative allocation fiscal year 1949.

1, 175, 200 Additional to complete after fiscal year 1949

358, 000 1 Includes 1918 appropriation of $1,900,000.

Authorization.—1936 and the 1938 Flood Control Acts.

Location and description.—The project consists of a system of concrete flood walls and earth levees along the Chemung River, Newton Creek, Diven Creek, and Seely Creek including a pumping station and a concrete conduit for enclosing Hoffman Brook.

Operations, fiscal year 1948.Construction of the concrete flood walls and the earth levees, under continuing contract, is in progress and construction of the project will be about 73 percent completed by June 30, 1948. Channel clearing in the Chemung River has been completed by separate contract. A continuing contract for construction of a pumping station and levee closure near the confluence of the Chemung River and Newton Creek has been initiated.

Proposed operations, fiscal year 1949.— Funds are needed in the fiscal year 1949 for continuation of construction of the project. The allocation of $1,175,200 will be applied as follows: $1,055,700 to the continuation of construction, under continuing contract now in force, of the walls and levees; and the amount of $119,500 will be applied to the construction of a levee closure, intercepting sewer and a pumping station for the disposal of internal drainage. · The latter work is scheduled for completion under separate contracts during the fiscal year 1949. The entire project will be 92 percent complete by June 30, 1949.

Justification.—The project is a unit of the southern New York project for flood control in the upper Susquehanna River Basin and will provide protection for the city of Elmira. During the flood of May 1946, the city of Elmira suffered flood damages in excess of $9,500,000, which would have been prevented had the protective works been completed. The city has previously suffered flood damages in excess of $9,500,000, which would have been prevented had the protective works been completed. The city has previously suffered severe flood damages in 1935. The project when completed will prevent recurrence of damages on the order of those which Elmira has recently experienced. Construction of the project should be completed at the earliest possible date to remove the existing flood threat to that city. The average annual flood-control benefits of the authorized comprehensive plan for flood control in southern New York, of which the Elmira localprotection project is an integral part, are estimated to be over 3 million dollars.

SUNBURY, PA.

Mr. ENGEL. Item 15, Sunbury, Pa.: Total estimated Federal cost, $7,271,000; allotments to date, $2,865,700; tentative allocation, 1949, $1,390,600.

What was the 1948 appropriation on that?
Colonel FERINGA. $1,369,000.

(The justification is as follows:)
Item No. 15. Sunbury, Pa.:
Total estimated Federal cost.

$7, 271, 000 Allotments to date.--

12, 865, 700 Tentative allocation, fiscal year 1949.

1, 390, 600 Additional to complete after fiscal year 1949.

3, 014, 700 1 Includes 1948 appropriation of $1,369,000.

« PředchozíPokračovat »