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chairman of the committee to organize the military and did much towards producing a concert of action against the invading enemy. In 1777 he was an efficient member of the Convention that framed the first constitution of his native state. Under that constitution he was appointed a judge of the Supreme Court. His acceptance raised him to the zenith of rebellion in view of the creatures of the crown. He was menaced by them and threatened by the tories. He promptly assumed the duties of his responsible station and boldly performed them. Stern justice, tempered with charity, directed his course. Officially he favored no friend-persecuted no enemy. His courts were held in the midst of bitter foes. No dangers could intimidate-no threats deter him from the faithful discharge of all the duties devolving upon him. When tories were arraigned before the court the overcharged zeal of jurors sometimes paralyzed their sense of right. On one occasion he sent out a jury of this kind four times with a direction to change their verdict of "guilty” which was not warranted by the testimony. The legislature talked loudly of calling him to an account for this act but on a sober second thought wisely determined to permit the old Roman to pursue the even tenor of his ways. His salary was far below the income of his practice at the Bar. To advance the interests of his country was above all pecuniary considerations. His salary for one year was paid in paper apology for money which depreciated so much in a few days that it took the whole to buy a pound of tea. This did not disturb his equanimity or abate his zeal in the glorious cause of Independence.

After the close of the Revolution Messrs. Robert Yates, Alexander Hamilton and Chancellor Livingston were chosen to represent the state of New York in the Convention that framed the Federal Constitution. His services on that important occasion were highly appreciated. He was opposed to some features of that sacred instrument but voted for its adoption when it came before the Convention of his own state. When it became the supreme law of the land he was one of its firmest supporters. In his first charge to the grand jury after it had been legally sanctioned he used the following language which I implore the reader to ponder well and let it come home with all the force of living truth proclaimed from the tomb of a departed patriot.

“The proposed form of government for the Union has at length received the sanction of so many of the States as to make it the supreme law of the land. It is not therefore any longer a question whether or not its provisions are such as they ought to be in all their different bránches. We, as good citizens, are bound implicitly to obey them. The united wisdom of America has sanctioned and confirmed the act

and it would be but little short of treason against the Republic to hesitate in our obedience and respect to the Constitution of the United States of America. Let me, therefore, exhort you gentlemen-not only in your capacity as grand jurors but in your more durable and equally respectable character as citizens-to preserve inviolate this Charter of our national Rights and safety-a Charter second only in dignity and importance to the Declaration of our Independence. We have escaped, it is true, by the blessing of divine Providence, from the tyranny of a foreign foe-but let us now be equally watchful in guarding against worse and far more dangerous enemiesDOMESTIC BROILS AND INTESTINE DIVISIONS."

Would to God this patriotic language of Judge Yates could be written in flaming capitals of living fire raised in bold relievo on plates of burnished gold and suspended in every court room, legislative hall, church, school-house and public place in our land. It should be circulated by every press in our country and committed to memory by every child.

Judge Yates was one of the Commissioners to settle the boundary question between New York and the States of Massachusetts and Connecticut. He was subsequently employed to prosecute claims of his native State against Vermont. In 1790 he was appointed Chief Justice of the Empire State and presided with great dignity until the 27th of January 1798 when his age reached the constitutional limit and closed his long, useful, arduous and brilliant judicial career. He had been an ornament to the Bench for twenty-one years. Not a stain had soiled his official ermine. He then resumed the practice of law and was appointed by the legislature of his state to settle disputed titles in the military tract which office he held until the Act creating it expired.

In comparative poverty and peace he glided down the stream of time until the 9th day of September 1801 when an arrow from the quiver of death pierced the shining mark-released his noble soul from its earthly prison and returned it to its original home of enduring bliss. He had exemplified primitive Christianity-his last hours were bright with hope, strong in faith, calm, peaceful and happy. He was greatly beloved in life-deeply mourned in death. In the performance of all the multiform duties of public and private life he stood approved by his friends, his country, his conscience and his God. He was an admired model of system in all the concerns of life-arranged his time judiciously, improved it wisely and earned a lofty fame that will endure while virtue is esteemed and patriotism lives. In the hands of such men our Republic will continue to rise in majesty sublime until its burning light shall illuminate the world and become too brilliant for the vision of all those who do not love and support our UNION.

and it would be but little short of treason against the Republic to hesitate in our obedience and respect to the Constitution of the United States of America. Let me, therefore, exhort you gentlemen-not only in your capacity as grand jurors but in your more durable and equally respectable character as citizens-to preserve inviolate this Charter of our national Rights and safety-a Charter second only in dignity and importance to the Declaration of our Independence. We have escaped, it is true, by the blessing of divine Providence, from the tyranny of a foreign foe-but let us now be equally watchful in guarding against worse and far more dangerous enemies–DOMESTIC BROILS AND INTESTINE DIVISIONS."

Would to God this patriotic language of Judge Yates could be written in flaming capitals of living fire raised in bold relievo on plates of burnished gold and suspended in every court room, legislative hall, church, school-house and public place in our land. It should be circulated by every press in our country and committed to memory by every child.

Judge Yates was one of the Commissioners to settle the boundary question between New York and the States of Massachusetts and Connecticut. He was subsequently employed to prosecute claims of his native State against Vermont. In 1790 he was appointed Chief Justice of the Empire State and presided with great dignity until the 27th of January 1798 when his age reached the constitutional limit and closed his long, useful, arduous and brilliant judicial career. He had been an ornament to the Bench for twenty-one years. Not a stain had soiled his official ermine. He then resumed the practice of law and was ap. pointed by the legislature of his state to settle disputed titles in the military tract which office he held until the Act creating it expired.

In comparative poverty and peace he glided down the stream of time until the 9th day of September 1801 when an arrow from the quiver of death pierced the shining mark-released his noble soul from its earthly prison and returned it to its original home of enduring bliss. He had exemplified primitive Christianity-his last hours were bright with hope, strong in faith, calm, peaceful and happy. He was greatly beloved in life-deeply mourned in death. In the performance of all the multiform duties of public and private life he stood approved by his friends, his country, his conscience and his God. He was an admired model of system in all the concerns of life-arranged his time judiciously, improved it wisely and earned a lofty fame that will endure while virtue is esteemed and patriotism lives. In the hands of such men our Republic will continue to rise in majesty sublime until its burning light shall illuminate the world and become too brilliant for the vision of all those who do not love and support our UNION.

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