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toise-shell, and exceeds in quantity that of any other island of the group; its population is two thousand.

The Horseshoe Reef lies between Goro, Nairai, and Wakaia; it is an extremely dangerous one. The name is derived from its shape, and its opening is on the north side; it is even with the water, which after stormy weather may be seen breaking on it, from the heights of Ovolau ; it is one mile in diameter; there are no other dangers nearer to it than the north reef of Nairai.

On the 4th of July, I suspended work, and gave the crew liberty to go on shore, which they enjoyed greatly, and amused themselves with playing at ball and other exercises. Many of them scalded and cleaned their pork in the hot water at the coral rocks.

On our first arrival here, few natives made their appearance, but we soon had a number of them around us from all parts of the bay. Some of these from the west side were savage and wild-looking fellows. There were, in all, about two hundred, and the females were much better looking than those we had heretofore seen. The latter danced for us; if the motions of their arms and legs, and clapping of their hands to a kind of chaunt, resembling that of the Jews in their synagogue, deserve to be so denominated. Their mode of dress is much the same as in the other parts of the group.

Among all this number we did not see one man over forty years of age; and on asking for the old people, we were told they were all buried !

The district of Savu-savu, from the best estimate I could obtain, contains about two thousand three hundred inhabitants. This district includes the part of the south coast of Vanua-levu, from Fawn Harbour, in the Tukonreva district, to Nemean Point, about eight miles west of the town of Savu-savu; it contains seventeen koros or towns.

To the westward of Savu-savu district is Wailevu, which extends beyond Kombelau, where the chief resides. He is said to have one hundred towns under him. This is, undoubtedly, an exaggeration, although his district is populous, and from information I received, the number of people under his rule may be set down as nearly seven thousand. These two districts are entirely independent of the great chief of the Feejees. The inhabitants are a fine-looking race of men, and we were told that they are well disposed towards the whites. The young women are the best-looking of any I have met with in the group, and are treated with more consideration and equality than is usual among these islands.

The natives about Savu-savu evinced much greater curiosity respecting us than we had heretofore remarked, and those from the bay

are particularly wild-looking. As elsewhere, when asked about the people of the interior, they describe them as being ferocious and cruel, saying that they go entirely naked, wearing no tapa; are very large and strong, eating roots and wild berries. They invariably connect something marvellous with their accounts; but on closely questioning these men, they all agreed that they had never seen one, and, from all the inquiries I have made through the missionaries, natives and whites, I am satisfied there are very few, if any, inhabitants that dwell permanently in the mountains. It is contrary to the usual habits of the Feejees, and those of all the groups in the Pacific. The climate of the mountains is too cold and wet, and entirely unsuited to their tastes and habits : so far from seeking the high lands, they are invariably found inhabiting the fruitful valleys, and only in times of danger and war resort to neighbouring inaccessible peaks, to protect themselves against their more powerful adversaries. Their food is almost exclusively produced in the low grounds and along the seashore, for it consists principally of fish, taro, yams, and cocoa-nuts, and the latter, as has been before observed, seldom reach maturity even at the altitude of six hundred feet.

The bay of Savu-savu may be known by a remarkable saddleshaped peak, lying just behind it; there are several other high peaks, that show the interior to be very rugged and high. Some of these peaks reach the altitude of four thousand feet.

On the evening of the 4th, Lieutenant Case returned, having finished the survey, connecting his work on with Rativa Island. There was no harbour found along this shore, expect for very small vessels and boats.

Lieutenant Alden, in the Flying-Fish, was now directed to proceed and examine some reefs on the north side of Vitilevu, that he reported having seen from the top of the Annan Islands, and also to examine the offing for reefs. He sailed on this duty at ten o'clock at night.

At daylight on the 5th, the Vincennes got under way to proceed to Mbua or Sandalwood Bay, with a moderate and favourable breeze. I determined to take the outside passage off Kombelau Point, although that usually pursued, which is close to the land, is considered the safest. There is a reef off Kombelau Island, five miles in length by two in width; and beyond, and between it and the great Passage Island Reef, there is a passage supposed to be full of shoals. I had reason to believe, however, from the examination of Lieutenant Perry and Mr. De Haven, that there would be no difficulty in taking the ship through, which I accordingly did. This channel has shoals in it, some with but a few feet of water over them, while others have sufficient for any class of vessels. The least water we had was nine VOL. III.

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fathoms. I believe we were enabled to locate all the shoals in it, and I think it a safe passage.

With the sun in the east, and steering towards the west, the dangers are distinctly visible.

After passing through this channel, we kept the great reef in sight, sailing for Buia Point. When about half way to that point, we passed along a reef a mile in length, lying four miles off the large island. The water is so smooth within these reefs that it is necessary to keep a good look-out from aloft, as the smaller ones seldom have any break on them.

Beyond Buia Point the passage becomes still more intricate, and opposite Rabe-rabe Island it is quite narrow, though there is ample water for any vessel. We, however, went briskly on, having a fine breeze from the eastward. After getting sight of the Lecumba Point Reef, there is but a narrow channel into the bay, which we reached at half-past 3 P. M. The Peacock had just arrived from the north side of Vanua-levu, and anchored.

Mbua or Sandalwood Bay, though much filled with large reefs, offers ample space for anchorage. The holding-ground is excellent, and the water not too deep. The bay is of the figure of a large segment of a circle, six miles in diameter, and is formed by Lecumba Point on the east and that of Dimba-dimba on the west. The land immediately surrounding it is low, but a few miles back it rises in high and picturesque peaks. That of Corobato is distinguished from the Vitilevu shore, and has an altitude of two thousand feet. The shores of the bay are lined with mangroves, and have, generally, extensive mud-flats. There are few facilities here for obtaining either wood or water, as the anchorage is a long distance from the shore. Several small streams enter the bay in its upper part, flowing from some distance in the interior. This was the principal place where the sandalwood was formerly obtained, but it has for some years past been exhausted. I shall defer speaking of this district until I have given an account of the operations of the Peacock.

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CHAPTER VI I.

CONTENTS.

PEACOCK AT VATULELE - SHORES OF VITILEVU - OPERATIONS OF LIEUTENANT EMMONS_SUVA-MBENGA-ITS CONQUEST BY NGARANINGIOU-NAMUKA-HARBOUR OF NDRONGA-MALOLO PASSAGE-LIEUTENANT EMMONS JOINS THE PEACOCK-LOSS.

OF THE LAUNCH-PEACOCK ANCHORS OFF BA-TABOOA-VOTIA-DONGALOA-MALAKI -MASSACRE OF ITS INHABITANTS BY TANOA-MALAKI PASSAGE-SANDALWOOD BAY -CIVIL WAR OF MBUA-CAPTAIN HUDSON MEDIATES A PEACE—THE CHIEFS ADOPT THE RULES AND REGULATIONS—THEY ARE FEASTED-LIEUTENANT EMMONS AGAIN DETACHED-CAPTAIN HUDSON VISITS THE SHORE-TOWN OF VATURUA-ALBINOMATAINOLE-RETURN OF ONE OF THE BOATS—WAR-DANCE-TRADING FOR PROVI. SIONS-DIMBA-DIMBA POINT-RUKE-RUKE BAY-VILLAGE OF WAILEA-DILLON'S ROCK -BICHE DE MAR FISHERY-BAY OF NALOA-TAVEA-VOTUA-CANOES AND POTTERY --NATIVE DANCE-MURDER OF CUNNINGHAM-MUTHUATA-LIEUTENANT EMMONS REJOINS THE PEACOCK-PRESENTS FROM THE KING OF MUTHUATA-HIS WIVESEXTENT OF HIS TERRITORY-VISIT OF KO-MBITI-VISIT FROM THE KING'S WIVESKING ADOPTS THE RULES AND REGULATIONS-CAPTAIN HUDSON DEMANDS THE

MURDERERS OF CUNNINGHAM

TURTLE PEN - SECOND VISIT FROM THE KING'S

WIVES-THEFT DETECTED AND PUNISHED-BURIAL-PLACE-VISIT OF THE KING'S SON

-CUNNINGHAM'S MURDERERS REPORTED TO HAVE ESCAPED_GINGI-EXCURSIONS OF THE NATURALISTS-ARRIVAL OF MR. HARRISON AT MUTHUATA-PREPARATIONS OF THE NATIVES FOR A FEAST-PEACOCK LEAVES MUTHUATA-RENEWAL OF THE CIVIL WAR OF MBUA-CANNIBALISM-JUNCTION OF THE PEACOCK WITH THE VIN CENNES.

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