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his head on the mast; they then took a rope, an inch and a half in thickness, when, beginning at his ankles, they wound it around his body and the mast, the turns being taken not far apart, up to his shoulders, allowing his head only to move a little, and thus exposed him all day to the sun! He was, towards evening, unbound and suffered to go, but he could not move, and was carried by four men. It is supposed if the ships had not been there, another and more deadly punishment would have been inflicted upon him.

I have now to speak of the examination the Porpoise made of the great sea-reef and islands to the west of the Asaua Group. They left the anchorage of Ya-asaua on the 21st of July, and shortly after discovered a sail, which proved to be the ship Triton, an American whaler, from which they obtained a few articles of provisions. Occasional soundings were found all over the space to the east of the island of Biva, the most western of the group, which I have already spoken of as being in sight from the high peaks that were observed on.

On the night of the 21st the brig struck several times with great violence on a coral shoal, but got over in safety. The next day they were near Biva, a long low island, with two smaller ones connected with it covered with cocoa-nut trees. Boats were sent out to examine it. The island is surrounded by a reef, and affords no anchorage; it is inhabited by about fifty souls. Fifteen of them came around the boat's crew on their landing, armed with clubs and spears, but they seemed very timid and inoffensive. They said they had suffered much from want of food, and that some had even perished from starvation. The island did not seem to produce any thing but cocoa-nuts, of which, after much difficulty, a few were procured. In their trade with us they preferred fish-hooks to any thing else, and gave as a reason to Aliko the pilot, that with them they could obtain food. They stated that in times of scarcity each person was allowed no more than three cocoa-nuts a day. Their koro was small and not far from the place of landing; but it was not visited, as they seemed unwilling that the party should do so.

After obtaining sights for chronometers and making the necessary examinations, they returned to the brig, and found the whaling-ship in company.

The reef that surrounds Biva extends three miles to the south of the island. Near its southern end is the opening, but it is not practicable even for a small vessel, without danger from the numerous coral lumps.

The great sea-reef was entirely lost sight of until approaching towards Malolo and the small islands to the north of it. The latter are numerous, and as they have no names, and are, as it were, detached from the Asaua Group, I have called the separate islands after some of the officers of the Expedition, and the whole the Hudson Isles. Finding also many others in a cluster on the northeast side of the group, I have given them the name of Ringgold Isles, and named the several islands after some of the officers engaged in the survey of them.

On the 25th, the Porpoise passed through the Malolo Passage, and shortly after joined company with the tender, near Malolo, as has been before related.

The reunion of the several vessels of the squadron did not give rise to the feeling of pleasure which had attended such meetings on other occasions. A deep gloom on the contrary was spread over the minds of all by the melancholy fate of their comrades, who had been the victims of the butchery at Malolo. In honour of their memories a funeral sermon was preached, on the 10th August, by the chaplain, before the assembled officers and crews. The address was affecting and appropriate, and on our arrival at Oahu was published at the request of the officers.

On the 10th of August, in the afternoon, the squadron beat down to Mali, and all the necessary preparations were made for going to sea the next day. Among these, several transfers were made in the officers of the squadron.

But a few parts of the group still required some further examination, viz.: Natava Bay, lying to the eastward, together with Rambe Island and the adjacent reefs, and the sea-reef extending from Kie Island towards Round Island. I was desirous, also, of looking after our shipwrecked countrymen on Turtle Island. I therefore gave the Porpoise and tender orders to execute these remaining duties, for which see Appendix XV.

We beat out of the passage of Mali, and discharged all the interpreters and pilots we had employed. They were paid off, and put on board their schooner the Kai-viti.

It gives me pleasure to bear testimony to their respectability and good conduct during our stay.

The services of these men were of great value to the Expedition To their acquaintance with the natives, I feel myself indebted for much of the information I have been able to give of this extraordinary people.

On taking our final departure from these islands, all of us felt grea! pleasure ; Vendovi alone manifested his feeling by shedding tears al the last view of his native land.

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CHAPTER X.

CONTENT S.

GEOGRAPHICAL POSITION OF THE GROUP - SURVEYS - CLIMATE WINDS - TIDES EARTHQUAKES — POPULATION – LANGUAGE – MODES OF SALUTATION – DISEASES SURGERY - SPORTS MESSAGES - TREATMENT OF THE WOMEN - AGRICULTURE

PLANTS-FOOD-SOIL-RAPIDITY OF VEGETATION-MONTHS AND DIVISION OF TIMETAMBO NALANGA-ARMS OF THE FEEJEES - HOUSES CANOES - TOOLS - POTTERY DIET-FEASTS-MODE OF SITTING-IDEAS OP GEOGRAPHY-DISTRIBUTION OF TIMEDRESS - TATTOOING NATIVE IDEAS OF DECENCY - USE OF OIL - COMMERCEDANGERS ATTENDING NAVIGATION_DEATH OF MRS. CARGILI-WHIPPY'S LETTER-EVENTS SINCE OUR DEPARTURE.

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