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some small degree aided in making the way for the introduction of the gospel more easy and smooth to them, than it had been before our visit to this group.

The few remaining operations of the squadron in this group will be found in the following chapter.

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CHAPTER X I.

CONTENT S.

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E SQUADRON FROM THE FEEJEE GROUP-PORPOISE AND TENDER

DETACHED-VINCENNES AND PEACOCK SEPARATE-OPERATIONS OF THE VINCENNES

-GARDNER'S ISLAND-M'KEAN'S ISLAND-HULL'S ISLAND-BIRNIE'S ISLAND-ENDER.

BURY'S ISLAND - FAILURE TO REACH SYDNEY ISLAND - KAUAI - OAHU MADE - AN. CHORAGE IN THE ROADS OF HONOLULU-LANDING-COUNTRY AROUND HONOLULU

APPEARANCE OF THE NATIVES-VINCENNES ENTERS THE HARBOUR OF HONOLULUVISITS FROM THE FOREIGN RESIDENTS - ARRIVAL OF THE PEACOCK --SEPARATE OPERATIONS OF THE PEACOCK-SEPARATE OPERATIONS OF THE PORPOISE_NATAVI BAY - CHICOBEA- SOMU-SOMU –VATOA-LOSS OF SHJP SHYLOCK - LATI — TOOFONASHOALS-PORT REFUGE-TONGA MISSIONARIES-NATIVES-CREW OF THE SHYLOCK

UPOLU

CHURCH BUILDING

MURDER OF GIDEON SMITH - DEMAND MADE FOR HIS

MURDERERS - DESERTERS GIVEN UP – PORPOISE SAILS FROM UPOLU, AND ARRIVES AT HONOLULU - SEPARATE OPERATIONS OF THE TENDER - KIE-FRIENDLY RECEP. TION AT THE SANDWICH ISLANDS-PLANS FOR THE FUTURE OPERATIONS OF THE

SQUADRON — RESHIPMENT OF THE SEAMEN - ENGAGEMENT OF KANAKAS-DUTIES ASSIGNED TO THE PEACOCK AND TENDER-TO THE PORPOISE-TO THE VINCENNESVISIT FROM THE GOVERNOR SCHOOL FOR THE CHILDREN OF CHIEFS – MODE OF CARRYING BURDENS – DWELLINGS IN HONOLULU – VALLEY OF NUUANU EMPLOY MENTS OF THE OFFICERS AND NATURALISTS-MISSIONARY INFLUENCE.

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CHAPTER X I.

HONOLULU.

1840.

AFTER the squadron had cleared the reefs, I made signal to the Porpoise to part company, for the purpose of proceeding to execute the orders I had given her commander. I afterwards despatched the tender to run along the sea-reef as far as Round Island, before shaping her course for Oahu in the Sandwich Islands.

The Vincennes and Peacock continued their course to the northward in company, and on the 13th, passed from east into west longitude, when we in consequence changed our reckoning a day. At the same time we lost the regular trade, and began to experience variable winds and light squalls.

Having now made all the necessary arrangements with Captain Hudson, I determined that the vessels should part company. By so doing, our passage to Oahu would probably be expedited,-a matter of some importance, in consequence of the low state of our stock of provisions; and pursuing separate tracks, there would be a better opportunity of searching for some doubtful islands, and of obtaining information in relation to the currents and winds. The vessels therefore parted company on the evening of the 14th, I having previously transferred Passed Midshipman Eld to the Vincennes, and Passed Midshipman Colvocoressis to the Peacock.

On the 15th August, the winds inclined more to the south, and on the 16th, on board the Vincennes, we had variable winds, veering to the northward. I therefore tacked to the eastward, in order to take advantage of the change of wind in making easting. Many tropicbirds were now seen. Our latitude was 5° 41' S., longitude 175° 46' W. On the 17th we passed the position where an island has been re

ported to exist, but saw nothing of it; and the wind was again from the northeast. The sick that had been received in the Vincennes from the Porpoise were all recovering rapidly.

On the 18th, the weather was fine and the wind still light; tropicbirds and tern were seen, and a constant look-out was kept, in the expectation of seeing land. This was the second anniversary of our sailing from the United States.

On the 19th, we made an island in the neighbourhood of the position assigned to Kemins' or Gardner's Island. Its true place is in latitude 4° 37' 42" S., "longitude 174° 40' 18" W. This is a low coral island, having a shallow lagoon in the centre, into which there is no navigable passage; but the reef on the western side is so low that the tide can flow into the lagoon.

When near enough to the island, the boats were lowered, and a number of officers and men landed, after passing for a considerable distance through a dangerous surf, breaking with violence over that part of the reef through which the tide flows into the shallow lagoon. The remainder of the reef which forms the island, is white coral sand, about three hundred feet wide, on which there is a vegetation that, unlike that of the other low islands of Polynesia, is devoid of low shrubbery.

Birds were numerous on the island, and very tame; the tropic-birds so much so that some of the sailors amused themselves by collecting their beautiful tail-feathers, which they twitched from the bird while

its nest,-an operation which the bird often bore without being disturbed. Besides birds, a large rat was found on this island.

The flood here sets strong to the northward, and the rise and fall of the tide was four and a half feet. No coral blocks were seen on this island, and it is less elevated above the water than those further to the eastward. The soil, however, appeared to be better than upon those, the coral sand being finer, and mixed with a greater quantity of vegetable mould. To this may be ascribed the larger growth of the trees upon it, which although of the same kinds as those which have been already mentioned as found growing on the coral islands, are forty or fifty feet in height. The island may be seen on a clear day at the distance of fifteen miles.

Believing this to be the island discovered by Captain Gardner, I have retained his name.

Here we made observations of magnetic declination, inclination, and intensity ; after completing which, we passed through the surf without accident, and on reaching the ship, filled away, and stood on our course.

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