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SPECIAL VALUE OF THE LIBRARY

From the Springfield, Mass., Republican Under the title of “The Railway Library 1909” are presented a number of papers and addresses of that year dealing with various phases of the transportation problem. The book is compiled and edited by Slason Thompson, manager of the bureau of railway news and statistics in Chicago. As much of the material so liberally supplied the public is hostile to the railroads, this presentation of their side of the story will be of special value to readers and students. Among the contributors may be mentioned J. Edgar Thomson, chief engineer of the Pennsylvania railroad company, James J. Hill, Senator John C. Spooner, etc.

Single copies of the 1909 issue of The Railway Library will be sent on application, accompanied by 15 cents in stamps to cover postage and expense of mailing.

The Railway Library for 1910 will be obtainable on like terms.

BUREAU OF RAILWAY NEWS AND STATISTICS
RAILWAY EXCHANGE BUILDING

CHICAGO

1910

(SECOND SERIES)

A COLLECTION OF NOTEWORTHY ADDRESSES AND

PAPERS MOSTLY DELIVERED OR PUBLISHED
DURING THE YEAR NAMED.

COMPILED AND EDITED BY

SLASON THOMPSON

DIRECTOR OF BUREAU OF RAILWAY News

AND STATISTICS

CHICAGO

CHICAGO
THE GUNTHORP-WARREN PRINTING Co.

1911

ALE 20151

6 fucano

** TABLE OF CONTENTS
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148 154

PAGE

INTRODUCTION.....................

3-4

RETROSPECT OF AMERICAN RAILWAYS.....

By Henry V. Poor, 1868.

SEVENTY-FIFTH ANNIVERSARY OF THE FIRST GERMAN RAILWAY.

27-30

From Zeitung des Vereins Deutscher Eisenbahnverwaltungen.

THE MINNESOTA RATE CASE......

31-92

Findings and Decision.

THE RAILROADS AND THE PEOPLE....

93-109

FoBy E. P. Ripley.

EFFICIENCY.........

... 110-134

By Howard Elliott, Frank Trumbull and W. J. Cunningham.

How IT APPEARS TO THE EMPLOYE........

136-147

From the Trainman's Journal.

THE NECESSITY FOR HIGHER RATES....

By James McCrea.

NEEDS OF THE RAILWAYS......

155-15

By Martin A. Knapp.

FARMERS' SHARE OF THE CONSUMER's Cost....

......... 159-167

By James Wilson.

MR. ACWORTH ON AMERICAN RAILWAYS...

168-169

THE FARMER AND THE COST OF LIVING.......

170-177

By B. F. Yoakum

RAILWAY MAIL Pay PRIMER.......

178-185

CO-OPERATION.............Bu Howard Elliott.

186-199

Half SLAVE AND HALF FREE.....

200-204

By H. U. Mudge.

WATERWAYS—THEIR LIMITATIONS AND POSSIBILITIES................... 205-221

By Frederic A. Delano.

GOVERNMENT OWNERSHIP....

.... 222-239

Its FAILURE IN AUSTRALIA-By A. W. Pearce.

Its FAILURE IN FRANCE-From United Press Report, and Les Debats.

THE PEOPLE'S INVESTMENTS IN RAILWAYS.

........ 240-249

By J. L. Laughlin, Ph. D.

RAILWAY ACCOUNTS AND STATISTICS.......

....... 250-262

***"By A. J. County

CAPITALIZATION OF RAILWAYS.....

By Frank Nay.

THE MEASURE OF A REASONABLE RATE......

273-282

By W. W. Finley.

RETURN ON CAPITAL INVESTED IN MANUFACTURES, AGRICULTURE AND

RAILWAYS .......

283-284

By L. E. Johnson

AUTOMATIC SIGNALS ON GERMAN RAILWAYS.....

285-292

From

PREVENTION OF RAILWAY ACCIDENTS. ...

293-304

By A. M. Schoyer.

THE PENNSYLVANIA's New York Station...

........

... 263-272

.......

.........

305-308
Illustrated.
EDWARD H. HARRIMAN.......

309-329

By Otto H. Kahn.

STATISTICS OF AMERICAN RAILWAYS FOR 1910.. .......

330-451

By Sason Thompson.

.....

......

HE reception accorded to the initial volume of The Railway Library for 1909 is the best warrant for the publication of its successor along the same

lines. The object of the series, as it may now be safely called, is to preserve in more permanent and accessible form information of current interest regarding the railway problems liable to be lost in the exhaustless stream of newspaper, periodical and pamphlet publicity-in the headlines today, scattered in yesterday's wastebaskets tomorrow.

Following the precedent of 1909, the Library of 1910 opens with a retrospect of American railways condensed from the sketch of the rise and progress of the Railways of the United States written by Mr. Henry V. Poor, for volume one of Poor's Manual for 1868-1869. Mr. Poor was then looking back over the first half of the history of railways on this continent. Looking forward, optimist though he was, his imagination did not quite comprehend the amazing development of the second period of two score years just ended.

Supplementing Mr. Poor's sketch, in a way, is a brief account of the 75th anniversary of the first railway in Germany. Singular to relate, this railway was never extended beyond its projected three and three-quarter miles from Nurnberg to Furth, and is still an independently operated railway.

With these for an historical background, the remaining papers of this issue seek to present the varied aspects of the railway situation in the United States today as reflected in the utterances of men closely identified with what they are writing or talking about.

Easily of first importance in the railway history of 1910 is the finding of ex-Judge Otis, special Master in Chancery in the Minnesota Rate Case, adopted and confirmed by Judge Sanborn in April, 1911. If sustained by the Supreme Court of the United States, the principles of this decision should go far to emancipating the railways from the multi

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