In God's Name: Genocide and Religion in the Twentieth Century

Přední strana obálky
Omer Bartov, Phyllis Mack
Berghahn Books, 1. 4. 2001 - Počet stran: 416

Despite the widespread trends of secularization in the 20th century, religion has played an important role in several outbreaks of genocide since the First World War. And yet, not many scholars have looked either at the religious aspects of modern genocide, or at the manner in which religion has taken a position on mass killing. This collection of essays addresses this hiatus by examining the intersection between religion and state-organized murder in the cases of the Armenian, Jewish, Rwandan, and Bosnian genocides. Rather than a comprehensive overview, it offers a series of descrete, yet closely related case studies, that shed light on three fundamental aspects of this issue: the use of religion to legitimize and motivate genocide; the potential of religious faith to encourage physical and spiritual resistance to mass murder; and finally, the role of religion in coming to terms with the legacy of atrocity.

 

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Obsah

Introduction
1
The Perpetrators Theology and Practice
21
Religion Ethnicity and Nationalism Armenians Turks and the End of the Ottoman Empire
23
Genocide Religion and Gerhard Kittel Protestant Theologians Face the Third Reich
62
When Jesus Was an Aryan The Protestant Church and Antisemitic Propaganda
79
A Pure Conscience if Good Enough Bishop Von Galen and Resistance to Nazism
106
Between God and Hitler German Military Chaplains and the Crimes of the Third Reich
123
Christian Churches and Genocide in Rwanda
139
Denial and Defiance in the Work of Rabbi Regina Jonas
243
A Personal Account
259
Aftermath Politics Faith and Representation
265
Zionist and Israeli Attitudes Toward the Armenian Genocide
267
Faith Religious Practice and Genocide Armenians and Jews in France following World War I and II
289
Orthodox Jewish Thought in the Wake of the Holocaust Tamim Paalo of 1947
316
JewishAmerican Artists and the Holocaust The Responses of Two Generations
342
The Journey to Poland
350

The Churches and the Genocide in the East African Great Lakes Region
161
Kosovo Mythology and the Bosnian Genocide
180
Survival Rescuers and Victims
207
The Absorption of Armenian Women and Children Into Muslim Households as a Structural Component of the Armenian Genocide
209
Transcending Boundaries Hungarian Roman Catholic Religious Women and the Persecuted Ones
222
Afterthought
372
Contributors
384
Index
389
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O autorovi (2001)

Omer Bartov is John P. Birkelund Distinguished Professor of History at Brown University. He was a Visiting Fellow at the Davis Center, Princeton University, and a Junior Fellow at Harvard's Society of Fellows.

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