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Beliefs. See Superstitions and beliefs.
Belphegor, 406, 467.
Bibliography for Folk-Lore of the Cherokee

of Robeson County, N.C., 384.
for "John Hardy,” 513, 514.
“Black Joan," 482.
Blood-letting, 379.
Boas, Franz, 193, 444.
Bolduc, Evelyn, Contes de la Beauce,

90-101.
Bolduc, Joseph, 90.
Borgia, Alexander, 464.
Bouchard, Mme Gédéon, 9.
Bouchard, Jean, 149.
Bouchard, Mme Jean, 24, 26.
Bouchard, M. Jean, et Madame, pl. 3

(following 184).
British-American folk-tradition, primary

sources of, 188, 189.
British Isles, plays based on earliest history

of, 455.
Brome, Richard, 483.
"Bugbears, The, Eng ish author of,

unknown, 471.
haunted-house theme in, 481.
Bulu Tales, 428-437.
Bundy, Richard C., Folk-Tales from

Liberia (in Abstract), 406-427.

Chorus, use of, in early plays, 449.
Christmas in Mexico, 186.
Clowns, 448, 466.
Cock-fighting in Sumatra, 306, 308, 314.
Comedy, 449, 466, 473.
"Comedy of Errors, The," 473, 475, 476.
Cone Mountain, B.C., 233, 234.
Conjuration of evil spirits, death-penalty

for, 474. See also spirits under Super-

stitions and beliefs.
Conjure-doctor, practices of, in South,

379-381.
Conjurer and witch, figures of, in early

English plays, borrowed from other

literatures, 476, 485.
pretended, 471, 472.
Conjurers in Elizabethan drama, 448, 461,

466-468, 470, 471, 476.
Constellation, polar, 521. See under In-

cidents, etc.
Contes populaires canadiens (troisième

série), 90-167.
Contes de la Beauce, 90-101.
Contes de Chicoutimi et de la Malbaie,

101-112.
Contes de Charlevoix et de Chicoutimi,

112-167.
Corpse, custom of talking to, in South,

383.
Cox, John Harrington, "John Hardy,"

505-520.
Croatan Indians of North Carolina, no

connection between, and the Cherokee

nation, 385.
Croyances et dictons populaires des

environs de Trois-Rivières (Canada),

168–175.
Curtin and Hewitt's Seneca Fiction,

Legends, and Myths, reviewed, 445,

446.
Customs:

Candlemas, 521.
Christmas in Mexico, 186.

- in the South, 378.
-Old, among Cherokee of North Caro-

lina, 393.
counting out done on "thorns" of holly-

leaf in North Carolina, 393.
Easter Day, in South Carolina, 378.
funeral, in the South (Negro), 382, 383.
kissing under the mistletoe, unfamiliar

in Robeson County, N.C., 393.
regarding war and peace among the

Tahltan Indians, 213.

“Caesar and Pompey," 463, 466.
California, Indians of northwestern, 346.
Canada, French settlements in, 186.

popular beliefs and sayings of, 168-175.
- songs of, 1-89.

- tales of, 90-167.
Candlemas Day, 449, 521.
Cantin, L.-H., 2, 3, 15, 32, 44, 59, 65, 68,

70, 73, 79, 81, 85.
Cape Breton, sailors' chanties and other

songs in, 189.
Catelan, M., on festival of the Holy Bear

and its relation to the sun, 521, 522.
Cats, spirits in form of, kept by witch in

her house, 468, 469.
Cedar-bark, red, offered to supernatural

beings, 354.
Cephalophus melanorheus (small mouse-

colored antelope), 429.
Ceremonials: girls' puberty, 350, 351.

Kuwega'n, of the Tahltan, 213, 215.

West Coast, use of red cedar-bark in, 354.
Chandra, illumination of northeast by, 342.
Chants populaires du Canada (Première

série), 1-89.
songs, 15-89. See Songs.
Chapman, George, beginning of dramatic

career of, 478, 479.
Charlatans, 467.
Charlemagne cycle of romances, 454.
Charmed ring, 454.
Charms, 468, 472, 484.
“Cheats," 480, 481.
Chesley or Shesley Mountain, B.C., 233,

234.
Chesley River, B.C., 233.
Choir-boys as stage fairies, 448, 451.

Dance-songs, French, 66-68.

from Illinois, 486-491, 495, 496.
Dancing, religious, 378.

use of fairies for, on the stage, 448-451.

see Ballet.
Darrel, Rev. John, notorious exorcist, 470,

476.
Dease Mountain, B.C., 231.
Dee, Dr. John, 460, 466, 476.
Dekker, Thomas, 455, 457, 458, 461, 467,

478, 479.

Densmore, Frances, on Teton Sioux music,

196.
Densmore's Teton Sioux Music, reviewed,

523-535.
Detroit River, French settlement on, 186.
Devil, the, in plays of magicians, 461, 463,

464, 466, 467.
submission to, by witches, 469, 475, 483.
"Devil's Charter" of Barnabe Barnes, 464.
Devils, employment of, in Elizabethan

drama, 448, 461.
Divination, 468, 473.
Dogs, sacrifice of, at ancient festival, 522.
spirits in form of, kept by witch in her

house, 468, 469.
Drama, magic and witchcraft well repre-

sented in Elizabethan, 447.
see also plays.
Dreams, the three, 178–180.
Dreams interpreted by wandering magi-

cians, 459.
see also under Superstitions and beliefs.
Dromio, 475, 476.
Drum, wooden, covered with goat or sheep

skin, 328, 330.
Dufault, A., 39.
E. C. P., A West-Indian Tale, 442, 443.
Eagle tail-feathers used as emblematic of

peace, 215.
East India Company, 312.
Ecuador, collection of myths from, 446.
Eel River, California Indians on, 346.
Ehrenreich, P., 446.
Elizabethan drama, witchcraft abundantly

represented in, 447.
-employment in, of fairies, magicians,

devils, conjurers, wise women, witches,

etc., 448.
Enchanter, mediæval, 453, 457.
of romance, practising magician and,

far apart, 459, 463.
the, in Milton's "Comus," a poetic

survival, 457
Endings, to tales from the South, 402, 403.
English translation of story of Faustus prob-

able source of Marlowe's Faustus, 461.
Essex, Countess of, 468.
Etiology:
why it brings bad luck on all, in hunting,

when one person does wrong, 249.
why bald-headed eagle eats fish only, 242.
why the bark of the red willow is thin, 223.
why the legs of bears are short and

crooked, 217,
why the beaver lives in low places along

rivers, 246.
why the beaver splashes his tail in water

and dives under to escape from Indian,

251.
why the beaver and porcupine make

their houses as they do, 246.
why a certain bird (not a robin) has a

red breast, 265.
why the birds are scattered over the

country, 209.

origin of birth and death, 206, 207, 216

(comparative notes).
why the buzzard eats carrion, 282.
how the buzzard's head became bare,

282.
why in front of the caribou's lower legs

there is meat, 217.
why there are great migrations of caribou,

232.
why cats kill rats, 419, 420.
why the coast country and interior

countries (Alaska) are different, and

why the people are different, 213.
origin of colors and crests of birds, 208,

209.
origin of constellations, 266.
origin of cremation, 239-241.
why crows talk feebly and caw, whereas

ravens talk loudly and croak, 223.
origin of daylight, 204 (comp. notes), 205.
origin of death, 207, 216 (comp. notes),

346, 407, 408.
origin of death-chant, 239.
how a certain species of deer got its white

markings, 417.
why deer run from Indians, suddenly

stop, look around, and run on again,

251.
why deer scent people from a distance,

346.
doctor's cult (Nibiked), origin of Ojibwa,

290 (comp. note), 291.
why a dog looks back at the person who

has beaten him, 421.
why dogs lost the power of speaking like

people, 243
origin of earth, 287.
origin of elks, 258.
why elks live in the woods, 259.
origin of feast for dead, 238.
origin of name February, 522.
origin of fire, 347, 446.
why fire can be made with wood or

rocks, 219.
origin of flood, 347.
why foam comes on the river when rain

falls, 443
why food is burned in fire at feast for

dead, 238.
how the fox came to have a bushy tail,

361.
why the fox preys upon chickens, 424.
origin of fresh water, 201-203.
why frogs croak, 420.
why game is easy to hunt, 218.
why ghosts are invisible, 226.
why ghosts sometimes strike people and

things at night, 226.
why there are stripes on the inside of the

stomachs of grizzly bears, 208.
why the Haida are superior to all tribes

in certain industries, 213.
origin of halibut-hooks, 210.
origin of hunger, 421, 422.
why Indians are careful not to offend

anything in nature, 209.

Etiology, continued:

why Indians use rattles, 290.
why Indians watch the Dipper whenever

there is an eclipse, 229.
why the Indians use brush-lodges, 212.
origin of killer-whale crest, 235 (comp.

notes), 236, 237.
why the king-salmon has red marks

below the ears, 242.
why the king-salmon is thick around root

of tail, 242.
why a lad at puberty is at first very

energetic, and later lazy, 239.
why lakes and fish may be found all

over the country, 220.
origin of lakes, comparative notes, 219.

-- laziness, 238, 239.
how the leopard's coat came to be spotted,

411, 412.
why leopards never lose a chance to kill a

deer, 417.
origin of lightning, 354, 422, 423.
why the loon has a big beak, 209.
why men are attracted to good-looking

women, but who are soft and useless,

220.
how man's mentula came to be split at

the end, 283
why mice are very small, 231.
why the mole has hands that are turned

backward, 349.
origin of the moon, 205, 255.
why the moose is very large, 231.
why mud is soft and people sink in it,

220.
why muskrats live in the water and have

poor houses, 243.
origin of night, 205.
origin of olachen, 203 (comp. notes), 204.
origin of peace ceremonies, 213.
why the pelican's (?) beak is shorter

now than formerly, 219.
why people and game have small floating

ribs, 226.
why people are not afraid of earthquakes,

227.
why people sometimes have had no food

in their homes, 221.
why people have names, 422.
why people sometimes starve, 216.
why pitch is found in wood of trees, 210.
origin of cultivated plants, 446.
why the porcupine has only four claws,

226, 246.
why the porcupine lives in high places in

the mountains, 246.
origin of the potlatch, 258.
origin of promontories, 254.
why the rabbit has a short tail, 361.
how rabbits came to have soft pads on

their feet, 222.
why the raven's nose has a mark as if it

had been broken off, 225.
why ravens are black, 203.
why ravens have crooked legs and walk

lame, 226.

why there are no feathers on raven's

feet, and why they look scorched, 221.
origin of Raven and Wolf phratries

among Tahltan, 207.
why the sheep is the best runner of all

animals, 231.
origin of sheep and goat horns, 215.
why the snipe has a long beak, and why

snipes run about on the shores of

lakes, 219.
why shovel-nosed snowshoes are called

“Wolf snowshoes," 250.
why the south wind blows only a short

time before a north wind springs up,224.
origin of the spear-head, 226.
why the spider's body is large, 347.
why squirrels cry as they do, 220.
origin of stars, 205.
why the steel-head salmon is thin, 242.
why the sucker has small bones all through

its body, 242.
origin of the sun, 205, 254, 255, 346, 347.
origin of sun and moon, 254, 255, 346,

347.
origin of thunder, 354, 422, 423.
origin of tides, 201.
origin of the toad crest of the Katce'de,

237 (comp. notes), 238.
why the tip of the weasel's tail is black,

290.
why willows are eaten by moose, 231.
why the willow-grouse has a crest, 209.
origin of winds, 224, 269–271.
why the winter season is about four

months, 226, 246.
why the hair on the wolverene's loins is

reddish, and why that animal has a

burnt smell, 248.
why the wolverene has a halting gait, 248.
why wolverenes eat corpses, 247.
why there are any wolves, 259.
why some women are good-looking, 220.
why women of the Wolf phratry of the

Tahltan are good-looking, 216.
why woodworms bore in wood, 243.
European Folk-Lore in America, The

Field of, 185-197.
Evil powers in plays, 466.
spirits, 468. See also under Superstitions

and beliefs.
- conjuration of, 474, 475.

- exorcism of, 476.
Execution of Negro, 505, 506.
Executions of witches, 469, 470, 474.
Exorcism, 383, 468, 470, 476.
Expressions of supplication, African, 407.

F. B., review of Curtin and Hewitt's

Seneca Fiction, Legends, and Myths,

445, 446.
review of Rafael Karsten's Myths of the

Ji'baros, 446.
Fabel, Peter, 463, 464.
Facétie des trois rêves 178–180.
Fairy plays of the Elizabethan period,

448–453

Fairy, the, as a stage figure, 449-452.
"Familiars" of witches, 469, 483.
Family legends of Nootka not common

property of tribe, 351.
names of Nootka, account of origin of, in

family legends, 355.
Farrand, Livingston, Quileute Tales, 251–

279.
"Fat Knight," 481.
"Fat Woman of Brainford," 449, 481.
Faustbuch of 1587, 461.
"Faustus," 451, 458.
and "Friar Bacon," characters of, con-

trasted, 463
Faustus, Dr. Johann, 461.
February, origin of name of, 522.
Female comes first into existence, in

Nootka family legend, 352.
Festivals:

Candlemas, 449, 521.
Christmas, 186.
Epiphany, 522.
Holy Bear, 521.
Purification of the Blessed Virgin, 521,

522.
spring-sun, 522.
"Fidele and Fortunio, or The Two Italian

Gentlemen," 472.
Finlay, H. H., 441.
Flood Legend of the Nootka Indians of

Vancouver Island, A, 351-355.
Florida, folk-tale from, 374 (No. 37).
Flute made of bamboo (Sunda Islands),

325, 328.
Fogg, Mrs. Rachel E., 497, 498, 500-503.
Folk-lore, field in Illinois for investigation

of, 496.
indifference to study of, in America,

438, 439.
research professorship in, established at

Vassar, 444.
Folk-Lore from Virginia, South Carolina,

Georgia, Alabama, and Florida, 357-

383
Folk-Lore of the Cherokee of Robeson

County, North Carolina, 384-393.
Folk-Tales from Liberia (in Abstract),

406-427.
Folk-Tales from Students in the Georgia

State College, 402-405.
Folk-Tales from Students in Tuskegee

Institute, Alabama, 397-401.
Folk-Ways and Notions, Southern, 376-383.
Foods, various, enumerated in Nootka

family legend, 352.
Forman, Simon, 468, 479.
Fortune-telling, 459, 465, 468, 473.
Fours, things go by, in Menominee and

Bungi stories, 297.
France, collection of popular poetry of,

194, 195
French element in America, 189.
population of New England about equal

to that of Province of Quebec, 187.
settlements in Canada, Louisiana, and

on the Detroit River, 186.

French-American folk-tradition, primary

sources of, 188.
French Government, attempt of, to collect

folk-songs of France, 194.
"Friar Bacon," 451, 458, 459, 462, 463.
"Friar Rush," 467.
Fruit of African tree that makes blood-red

stain, 428.
Gaelic-American lore, language, and cus-

tom, field of, neglected, 189.
Games, game-songs, and amusements:

Buffalo Girls, 487.
"Christmas Eves, Eves, Eves," 378.
corn-husking, 388.
counts, 377.
Creel-my-Crankie, 489.
Fire on the Mountain, 493.
Going down to Rousie's, 492.
Green grow the Rushes Ol 491.
Happy is the miller, 490, 491.
Hen and Hawk, 376.
Hoop and Hide, 377.
hugging-game, 492, 493.
I'm a poor old chimney sweeper, 491,

492.
I wonder where Maria's gone, 495, 496.
If girls they were ducks, 490.
In this ring comes a lady fair, 495.
King William was King James's Son.

493, 494.
kissing-games, 489-492, 494, 495.
Marching to Quebec, 491.
Mother, O mother! my toes are sore, 496.
Naming Baby's Fingers, 377.
Oats, pease, beans, and barley grows. 494.
Old Dan Tucker, 488, 489.
Old Virginny never tire, 492.
Peanut-Hunt, 378.
pea-whipping, 388.
Peep Squirrel, 376, 377.
Put your right foot in, etc., 496.
quilting-parties, 388.
Rich man, poor man, etc., prognosticates

a mate in North Carolina, 393.
Roxie Ann, 492.
Seek and Find, 377.
Skip to my Lou, 493.
The Juniper-Tree, 489, 490.
The Wild-Goose Chase, 494, 495.
There comes two dukes a-roving, 486.
Turkey in the Straw, 489.
Weevily Wheat, 488.

We're marching round a Pretty Girl, 495.
Gandharva, 335. 341.
Ganelon, 454.
GaxEwi'sa ("rabbits eat on the top").

month when people meet to ask

questions and riddles, 226.
Geechee and Other Proverbs, 441, 442.
Geoffrey of Monmouth, 455, 456.
Geological Survey of Canada, Division of

Anthropology of, 351.
Georgia, folk-tales from, 370-373, 402-405.
German oral tradition in Pennsylvania,

primary source of, important, 186.

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Ghosts, problems concerning, quite distinct

from those relating to human beings
who operate with spirits, or the spirits

themselves, in plays, 448.
Glacier or Sand Mountain, B.C., 231.
Gloucester, Duke of, character in "Richard

III," 475.
Goats, sacrifice of, at ancient festival, 522.
Goddard, P. E., Athapascan collections by,

346.
Goofering, 380.
Gosselin, C.-E., 2, 4.
Grazzini, 471.
Greene, Robert, 449, 450, 461-463, 465.
Ground-hog, myth of, and its origin, 521,

522.

-

Hair of Sumatrans, mode of dressing, 312.
Hamelin, M., 4.
Hardy, John (Negro), order for execution

of, 505, 506.
Hartley, Edmund, 468.
Harvey, Emily N., A Brer Rabbit Story,

443, 444.
Hawaii, field-work in folk-lore done in, 444.
Hawkins Island, in Barclay Sound, B.C.,

352.
Hengist and Horsa, 454, 455.
"Henry VI," 473-475.
Henslowe, Philip, 450, 456, 478.
Herrington, H. W., Witchcraft and Magic

in the Elizabethan Drama, 447-485.
Hewitt, J. N. B., Iroquois tales, 445.
Heywood, Thomas, 461, 468, 478, 479, 481,

483
Historical drama, 455.
Holinshed, Raphael, 455, 473-475.

animals enemy to each other, are appor-

tioned meat at feast, and leave it un-
touched, 410.
- fall dead when owner of supernatural

sword sees them, 277.
- go for water, hear music, and begin to

dance, 412, 413.
- in two groups, make peace with each

other, 214, 215.
- invited to feast by gorilla, 409.

of bush, meet and agree to live to-
gether, 415.
- origin of war against, 411.
- pits dug to kill, 436.
run to see which runs fastest, 231.

scattered over country by game-
mother, 231.
- tracks of, lead to hunters' tent, 294.

urged to make hornbill go to river
and throw up palm-nut kernels to
avoid famine, 410, 411.

welcome Nymo home on account of
"chop" he brings, 415.

woman gives birth to, 230, 231.
ant, 456.
antelope (Cephalophus leucocastec), 434.

(C. melanorheus), does not heed
mother's advice, and dies, 435.
-- turtle borrows horns of, 429.

in guise of, steals civet-cat's
daughter, 430.
antlers, deer, boys throw stones at, hit

and split deer-skull, and release

Nänibozhu, 289.
anus, bushes scratch Nänibozhu's, till

it itches, 280.
- buzzard eats flesh at dead moose's,

282.
- culture-hero is angry with, and burns

it to punish it, 280.
- weasel enters cannibal's, and bites his

heart, 290.
apple, golden, borne by tree every night,
123.

. stolen at midnight, 125.
apples, large, in a huge tree, 153.
arrow shot into air drops along a trail,
293.

falls on trail leading to old
woman's camp, 293, 294.

into sky, invisible to all animals
except snail, 265.
- with bone point, 273.
arrow-chain, 264, 265, 446.
arrows and bow hidden in hollow stump,
247.

flint-tipped, 304.
- Raven keeps shooting, past wife's
head, to frighten and deceive her, 272.

shot at snakes, old woman sings,
intending to pull out, 285.
ashes, brothers of returning hunter
throw, in hunter's eyes, 294.

stolen wife finds brother-in-law in
form of hair-snake in, 303.
Atsentmā, or the meat-mother, 216.

Hovington, Édouard, 9, 123, pl. 3 (following

184).
Hunting-rituals of Nootka, 354.
"Huon of Bordeaux," 449, 450.

Incidents and objects in myth or tale

(see also Etiology):
a year and a day's delay, 129.
abalone, 261.
acorns, deer children live on, 349, 350.
advice, refusal to heed, causes death of
animals, 432, 435.

- causes death of child, 435.
alligator carries rabbit in guise of squirrel

across a pond, and gives himself away,

404.
animal called Bijo (Blame) invulnerable,
436.

which grows larger and larger, 398.
animals all devoured by leopard except

tortoise, 417.
- angry at Nymo for robbing them of
their “chop," 410.

become tame and go into people's
houses, 232.
- calling of, 295 (comp. note), 414-416,

432-434.
- caught by leopard, taken by turtle, 431.

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