The London and Edinburgh Monthly Journal of Medical Science, Svazek 2

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Strana 447 - China, it does not appear that the Chinese in easy circumstances, and who have the comforts of life about them, are materially affected in respect to longevity by addiction to this habit.
Strana 126 - Tis but an hour ago since it was nine, And after one hour more 'twill be eleven. And so from hour to hour we ripe and ripe, And then from hour to hour we rot and rot; And thereby hangs a tale.
Strana 773 - ... Physiology has sufficiently decisive grounds for the opinion, that every motion, every manifestation of force, is the result of a transformation of the structure or of its substance ; that every conception, every mental affection, is followed by changes in the chemical nature of the secreted fluids ; that every thought, every sensation, is accompanied by a change in the composition of the substance of the brain.
Strana 325 - RESEARCHES INTO THE CAUSES, NATURE, and TREATMENT of the more prevalent DISEASES of INDIA, and of WARM CLIMATES generally.
Strana 776 - Nor can he withstand the captivation of brandy, which, acting as an element of respiration, puts a stop to the change of matter, by performing the function which properly belongs to the products of the metamorphosed tissues.
Strana 402 - The spiral form, which has heretofore seemed wanting, or nearly so, in animal tissues, is then shown to be as general in animals as in plants. Nervous tissue, muscle, minute blood-vessels, and the crystalline lens, afford instances in proof of this. And if the author's view of identity in structure between the larger and the smaller filaments be correct, it follows that spirals are much more general in plants themselves than has been hitherto supposed; spirals would thus appear, in fact, to be as...
Strana 784 - ... frequently occur which in reality arise from the loss of blood ; but which a superficial observer will be led to attribute to the injury itself, and concerning which indeed it is sometimes difficult, even for the most experienced surgeon, to pronounce in the first instance to which of these two causes they are to be referred. Repeated copious blood-letting is of itself adequate to produce a hardness of the pulse, which we shall in vain endeavour to subdue by persevering in the same system of...
Strana 127 - The seasons' difference ; as, the icy fang, And churlish chiding of the winter's wind; Which when it bites and blows upon my body, Even till I shrink with cold, I smile, and say, — This is no flattery: these are counsellors That feelingly persuade me what I am.
Strana 774 - The oxygen taken into the system is given out again in the same forms, whether in summer or in winter ; hence we expire more carbon in cold weather, and when the barometer is high, than we do in warm weather ; and we must consume more or less carbon in our food in the same proportion ; in Sweden more than in Sicily ; and in our more temperate climate a full eighth more in winter than in summer. Even when we consume equal weights of food in cold and warm countries...
Strana 826 - A physician in a great city seems to be the mere plaything of fortune ; his degree of reputation is, for the most part, totally casual; they that employ him know not his excellence ; they that reject him know.not his deficience.

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