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An INDEX to the two Volumes of THE CHURCHMAN for 1905, will be found

in this issue on page 29.

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FORTY-FOUR PAGES.

Editorial........

7

Our Spiritual Birth-rate: The Turning Tide.-Architecture and

the Church.

Chronicle and Comment

5

Dominican Affairs.-A Disappearing Deficit.-The Panama
Report.-The Postmaster-General's Report.-The Tax on Art.-
A Prosperous Year.-A Public Service Trust.-Treaty Between
China and Japan.-The Situation in Russia.-France and the

Vatican.

......

American Church News...

8

Memorial of Bishop Tuttle in Idaho.-The United Church of
Canada.-Bishop Lawrence on the Jews.-Archdeacon Stuck's
Journey.-The Syrian College at Beirut.

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sizes

This sale also includes Sheets, Pillow Cases, Towels, Blankets, Bed Spreads, and French Lingerie. All at reduced prices.
"The Linen Store," JAMES MCCUTCHEON & CO., 14 W. 23d St.. New York

17

Biography and Travel.

LIFE (The) STORY OF HENRY CLAY TRUM-
bull, by Philip E. Howard, with an Introduc-
tion by Charles Gallaudet Trumbull, pp. 525:
$1.75, ill. (Sunday-school Times Co.)
NATION BUILDERS, by Edgar Mayhew Bacon,
and the late Andrew Carpenter Wheeler, pp.
196: $1. (Eaton & Mains.)
WRITINGS (The) OF BENJAMIN FRANKLIN,
Collected and Edited with a Life and Intro-
duction, by Albert Henry Smyth. Vol. III.
(1750-1759), pp. 483: $3. (Macmillan Co.)

New Books of the Week.

Theology, Religion and Philosophy.
ADVENTURE FOR GOD, by the Rt. Rev. ST. JOHN'S SCHOOL,

Charles H. Brent, pp. 158: $1.10. (Long-
mans, Green & Co.)

LIFE (The) OF CHRIST, by the Very Rev. Alexander Stewart, D.D. (Temple Series of Bible Handbooks), pp. 124. (Lippincott Co.) RELATIONS (The) OF FAITH AND LIFE, by the Rt. Rev. A. C. A. Hall, D.D., LL.D. (Bedell Lectures, 1905), pp. 89: $1. (Longmans, Green & Co.)

Sociology, Politics and Economics. MODERN (The)

TRUST COMPANY: ITS Functions and Organization, by F. B. Kirkbride and J. E. Sterrett, C.P.A., pp. 309: $2.50. (Macmillan Co.) PUNISHMENT (The) OF CHILDREN, by Felix Adler (Ethical Addresses, Vol. XIII., No. 3), pp. 100: 10 cents. (Ethical Addresses, 1415 Locust street, Philadelphia, Penn.)

Poetry and Drama. CLIMBERS (The), by Clyde Fitch: 75 cents. (Macmillan Co.) CONFESSIONS (The) OF JOHN ALLEN, AND Other Poems, by John Allen, pp. 359. (Mandel & Phillips Co., Chicago, Ill.) MILTON'S ODE ON THE MORNING OF

Christ's Nativity, with an Introduction by

Juvenile and Educational.

KING HENRY THE FIFTH, by William Shakespeare, from the Riverside Edition, Edited by Richard Grant White, with an Introduction and Additional Notes, by Edward Everett Hale, Jr., Ph.D., pp. 147: 25 cents. (Houghton, Mifflin & Co.)

DIVINITY SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES.
New York City.

The General Theological Seminary

CHELSEA SQUARE, NEW YORK.

The next Academic Year will begin on Wednesday, September 19th, 1906.

Special Students admitted and Graduate course for Graduates of other Theological Seminaries.

The requirements for admission and other particulars can be had from

THE DEAN.

SCHOOLS FOR GIRLS.

Science, Nature and Art.

New York City.

CONQUEST (The) OF ARID AMERICA, by
William E. Smythe (New and Revised Edi-
tion), pp. 360: $1.50, ill. (Macmillan Co.)
Reviewed in THE CHURCHMAN of July 14, 1900. THE MERRILL-van LAER SCHOOL

Connecticut.

TRINITY COLLEGE, Hartford, Conn.
Comprehensive Library at all times open to students
for study in Languages, Literature, History, Econom-
ics, Philosophy, Mathematics, and the Sciences.
Thoroughly equipped Laboratories for Work in
Chemistry, Natural History, Physics, and Electrical
Engineering.

Courses in Civil Engineering.
Academic Year began Sept. 28.

For Catalogues, etc., address the Secretary of the
Faculty.

SCHOOLS FOR BOYS.
Connecticut.

THE

SCHOOLS FOR BOYS.

New York.

Glen Levin Swiggett, pp. 32. (University HOO SAC SCHOOL

Press of Sewanee, Tenn.)
PERSEPHONE AND OTHER POEMS, by Mem-
bers of the English Literature Department of
Wellesley College, for the Benefit of The
Wellesley Library Fund, pp. 221. (Fort Hill
Press, Boston, Mass.)

CHESHIRE. SCHOOL

Cheshire, Conn.

FOUNDED 1794.

(13 miles north of New Haven.)

MOUNTAIN ELEVATION

A select and model preparatory school for

BOYS

112th year.

Modern Sanitary Plumbing, Artesian Well Water, Electric Lighting, and all modern conveniences. Catalogues on application. THE CHESHIRE SCHOOL, 111 Broadway, New York City.

Kast Building, cor. Washington and Hanover Streets,

Boston, Mass.

MANLIUS, N. Y.

Term began Sept. 21, 1905. Apply for information to
WM. VERBECK.

Maryland.

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ST. JAMES SCHOOL

Washington County, Maryland,
Near Hagerstown.

Boarding School for Boys. Numbers limited.
Illustrated Catalogue on application.
ADRIAN H. ONDERDONK, Head Master.

Virginia.

EPISCOPAL HIGH SCHOOL

NEAR ALEXANDRIA, VA.
L. M. BLACKFORD, LL.D., Principal.
FOR BOYS. Catalogue on application.

Boarding and Lay School for Girls. Formerly The
Peebles and thompson School Opens October 4th.

30, 88 and 34 Eact 37th Street, New York, N. Y.

New York.

HOOSICK, N. Y. Church School for boys. Prepares
for college. Situated among the hills of the Berkshire
Range, 80 miles from Albany. For catalogue apply to
REV. É. D. TIBBITS, Rector.

RT. REV. W. C. DOANE. D.D., Visitor.

NEW YORK, ALBANY.

St.Agnes' School for Girls, Preparation
for leading
colleges. Also advanced course, with diploma. Three well
equipped laboratories. Health first consideration. Catalogue.
Miss BRABUBY, Head of School. BISHOP DOANE, President
Board of Trustees.

Peekskill-on-Hudson, N. Y.

BOARDING SCHOOL FOR GIRLS.
Under the Charge of the Sisters of Saint Mary.
College Preparatory and General Courses. Extensive
recreation grounds. For catalogue address

THE SISTER SUPERIOR.

The Cathedral School of St. Mary

A school for girls, eighteen miles from New York.
Number limited; healthful location; spacious build-

ings; college preparatory work. Excellent advantages

in music and modern languages. References required.
Address Miss ANNIE S. GIBSON, Principal,
Garden City, Long Island, N. Y
Connecticut.

INGLESIDE-A School for Girls

New Milford, Litchfield Co., Conn.
Second half-year begins Feb. 6th, 1906.

MRS. WM. D. BLACK, Patroness.
Massachusetts.

Rogers Hall School

For Girls. Admits to Smith, Vassar, Wellesley,
Wells, Mt. Holyoke. Beautiful grounds. Golf. Bas
ket Ball, Tennis, Field Hockey, Horseback Riding.
MRS. E. P. UNDERHILL, M.A., Prin., Lowell, Mass.

Walnut Hill School

NATICK, MASS. A college preparatory school for
girls. Seventeen miles from Boston.
Miss CONANT and Miss BIGELOW, Princ'ls.

New Hampshire.

S. Mary's Diocesan School for Girls.
CORCORD, NEW HAMPSHIRE.
Healthful location, moderate terms.
Literary and College Preparatory Courses.
The twentieth year began September 19th, 1905.

MISS ISABEL M. PARKS, Principal.

SCHOOLS FOR GIRLS.

Pennsylvania.

ALL SAINTS' SCHOOL, Germantown

Philadelphia.
BOARDING SCHOOL FOR GIRLS.
Primary, Intermediate and College Preparatory.
Address THE SISTER, Wister Street.

15

Washington College

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NATIONAL PARK SEMINARY SAINT GABRIEL'S For Young Women. Washington, D.C. (Suburbs)

The Glen School. The story of this school: of its phenomenal growth; its remarkable equipment of 12 buildings, attractively grouped in college fashion, forming a miniature village; its unique subdivision into eight groups of girls; its training in home making and social graces; its development of special talents; its provisions for pleasure, sight seeing and study of our National Capital-can only be told fully in our catalogue I. Address FOREST GLEN, Maryland.

WALNUT LANE SCHOOL
For Girls. Prepares for all colleges. Attractive
home life. Ample grounds for outdoor exercise. Illus
trated catalogue on request.

MRS. THEODORA B. RICHARDS, Principal,
Germantown, Philadelphia, Pa.

Onto.

The Bartholomew-Clifton School FOR

GIRLS

An attractive home department for a limited number of resident pupils. Prepares for the best colleges. Special advantages in Music, Art and Languages. Tennis, Basket-Ball. MISS E. A. ELY, A.M., and MISS M. F. SMITH, Princ'ls. Evanswood, Clifton, Cincinnati.

Maryland.

Edgeworth Boarding and Day School
For Girls The 43rd year began Sept. 28th.
Mrs. H. P. LEFEBVRE,

Miss E. D. HUNTLEY, Principals. 122 and 124 W. Franklin Street, Baltimore, Md.

Virginia.

Virginia Female Institute College Prepara

tory School for Girls. Music, Art, Elocution and Languages.
Native French teachers. Musica specialty.
620 year
began Sept. 14th. Miss Maria Pendleton Duval, Prin.

District of Columbia.

National Cathedral School FOR

GIRLS Washington, D. C. Fireproof building. Park of forty acres. Unrivalled advantages in Music. Certifcate admits to college. Gymnasium. Studio. 5th year. MISS BANGS and MISS WHITON.

TEACHERS.

A

MERICAN AND FOREIGN TEACHERS AGENCY. fessors, Teachers, Tutors and Governesses, resident or visiting. American or Foreign. Parents aided in choice of schools.

MRS. M. J. YOUNG-FULTON,
23 Union Square, New York.

THE Pratt Teachers' Agency

.....

District of Columbia.

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An ideal school for girls and young women, located on a beautiful estate of 10 acres, within the National Capital. Surrounded and within easy reach of the many and varied educational institutions for which Washington is famed.

THE CHURCHMAN will gladly answer requests of its readers for information about advertisements.

Cultured instructors; delightful home life; refined associations; sight seeing systematized; 80cial advantages wholesome. Preparatory, Certificate and Co lege Courses. Music, Art, Elocution. Applications now received for the Fall of 1906. Terms $700.00. Catalogue on request.

F. MENE FEE, President, 3rd and T Sts., N. E., Washington, D. C.

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ANNUITIES.

Life Annuities, so popular for ages in Europe, are daily increasing in vogue in the United States. When guaranteed by the STRONGEST FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS OF THE WORLD, the income is so ABBOLUTELY SAFE that mental ease and comfort are assured. For particulars apply to or address BARENT H. LANE, The Equitable Life Assurance Society, 128 Broadway, New York City.

$2,000,000

THE WHITNEY COMPANY

FIRST MORTGAGE AND COLLATERAL TRUST
SIX PER CENT. GOLD BONDS

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Due 1964.

Optional after 1914 at 110 and Interest
This Company has been formed to develop the largest single water power in the
Southern States, located on the Yadkin River, in North Carolina.

Present development
rospective development
Computations based on minimum flow

The Company possesses two unique features in water power plants, viz.: No ice, and an existing demand for more than double the present development-this demand comes from over 250 highly prosperous cotton mills within an So-mile radius.

Price 100 and accrued interest

T. W. STEPHENS & Co.

2 WALL STREET, NEW YORK

Please mention THE CHURCHMAN in writing to advertisers.

ATTORNEYS AND AGENTS FOR

Messrs. J. S. MORGAN & CO., ག

No. 22 OLD BROAD STREET, LONDON.

40,000 H. P.

40,000 H. P. additional

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From Our Own Designs.

ALSO IN

ENGLISH STAINED GLASS

BY

Heaton, Butler & Bayne, of London, Eng.
THE GORHAM COMPANY
Fifth Ave. at 36th St., New York.

J. A. HOLZER

59 WASHINGTON SQUARE, SOUTH, NEW YORK

MEMORIAL WINDOWS

GLASS MOSAICS MURAL PAINTINGS TABLETS

MAITLAND ARMSTRONG & Co.,

61 WASHINGTON SQUARE, SOUTH, NEW YORK. STAINED GLASS AND

DECORATIVE WORK. SOLE AGENTS FOR

CLAYTON & BELL, Glass Stainers, London.

R. GEISSLER, 56 W. 8th St., New York. CHURCH WORK and STAINED GLASS EXCLUSIVELY.

* MEMORIAL *
Church Bells and Chimes

Unlike all others. Full, Mellow, Evenly Allows Interest on Daily Balances.

The True, Genuine "Meneely Standard."
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Capital and Undivided Profits, $8,000,000

The Company is a legal depositary for moneys paid into Court, and is authorized to act as Executor, Administrator, Trustee, Guardian, Receiver, and in all other Fiduciary capacities.

Acts as Trustee under Mortgages made by Railroad and other Corporations, and as Transfer Agent and Registrar of Stocks and Bonds. Receives deposits upon Certificates of D posit, or subject to check, and

Manages Real Estate and lends money on bond and mortgage.

Acts as Agent for the transaction of any approved financial business.

EDWIN 8. MARSTON, President.
THOS. J. BARNETT, 2d Vice-President.
SAMUEL SLOAN, JR., Secretary.
AUGUSTUS V. HEELY, Ass't Sec'y.
WILLIAM B. CARDOZO, Ass't Seo'y.
CORNELIUS R. AGNEW, Ass't Beo'y.

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BOARD OF DIRECTORS.

Samuel Sloan,
William Waldorf Astor,
S. 8. Palmer,

D. O. Mills,
Robert F. Ballantine,
Franklin D. Locke,
George F. Baker,
Charles A. Peabody,
Hugh D. Auchincloss,
D. H. King, Jr.,
Henry Hents,
Robert C. Boyd,
Archibald D. Russell,

MONUMENTS

If intending to purchase a memorial, large or small,
we ask you to write us to-day, for our free booklet.

It will interest you. N. B.-Distance is no obstacle.

THE CHURCHMAN will gladly answer requests of its readers for information about advertisements.

James Stillman,
Moses Taylor Pyne,
Henry A. C. Taylor,
E. R. Holden,
William Rowland,
Edward R. Bacon,
H. Van R. Kennedy,
Cleveland H. Dodge,
John L. Riker,
A. G. Agnew,
Henry H. Rogers,
P. A. Valentine,
Edwin 8. Marston.

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The Churchman

The Faith once delivered unto the Saints

Our Spiritual Birth-rate: The

Turning Tide.

Nothing in the state of the Church should give more unalloyed satisfaction than the fact that in every section of it the downward course that has continued for more than a decade is at last checked, and the spiritual birth-rate is once more rising. For, as we have said time and again, the relation of infant baptisms to marriages and to communicants is the test of a standing or a falling Church. Let us recall, briefly, what this relation has been for the last ten years. For every marriage

recorded in the Annual for 1895, there were 3.1 infant baptisms. In the next three years the baptisms for every marriage fell to 2.9. Then they declined to 2.7 and the Annual for 1900 showed but 2.4. A slight gain in 1901, 2.5, was lost in the next year; 1903 showed a ratio of 2.2 baptisms to each marriage; in 1904 the ratio had sunk to 2.1, and last year it was fractionally even less than this. That, let us hope, was ebb tide, for this year we have recovered and slightly bettered the position of 1903 with 22,402 marriages to 49,470 infant baptisms, a ratio of a little over 2.2. The same improvement is revealed by a comparison of infant baptisms and communicants. In spite of the considerable increase in the communicant roll over last year there was an infant baptized for every 16.1 communicants. For the two preceding years the ratio was one to 16.8; indeed we must go back to 1902 to find a condition as favorable as the present, though we are still far from the condition of ten years ago, when for every 12 communicants a child was brought to the font.

Every section of the country has contributed to this change, as will appear from an analysis of the figures by sections and a comparison of it with that which we made last year. We then suggested a division of the dioceses into six groups. First the distinctively urban; then those of the Northeast, the Northwest, the Southeast, the Southwest and the Pacific Coast.

Saturday, January 6, 1906.

Philadelphia and its suburbs, where
housing conditions are better than in
either New York, Chicago, or Boston, from
2.8 to 3.1. The other city dioceses fall
slightly below the average for the Church;
Pennsylvania's ratio is better than that
of any section of it.

CONDITIONS IN THE NORTHEAST.

In the thirty less distinctively urban dioceses of the Northeast, there were 10,075 marriages and 24,117 infant baptisms, so that the ratio now has become 2.4 where last year it was but 1.9, the, most remarkable improvement recorded in any section of the Church. In this region, stretching from the Potomac to Canada and from the Atlantic to the Mississippi, there were but five dioceses that presented a less favorable record this year than last,

and but three others that did not do more than hold their own. The position of each diocese can be most conveniently indicated, as was done last year, by stating the number of infant baptisms in it for every 10 marriages, thus avoiding an irksome decimal. If, for instance, in the new diocese of Harrisburg there are 155 marriages and 568 infant baptisms, we may say that Harrisburg's ratio is 37, that being the number of infant baptisms for every 10 marriages there. The best record in this Northeastern district is that of Pittsburgh, 41. Then follows Harrisburg, 37; Fond du Lac, 36; New Jersey, 34; Quincy, 31; Springfield, 31; Maryland, 30; Newark, 30; Central Pennsylvania, 29; Marquette, 28; Connecticut, 27, and Delaware, 26. Twelve dioceses, therefore, are above the average for the section. Milwaukee, 24; Vermont, 23, and Washington, 23, are above the average for the Church. Long Island, 22, and Western Massachusetts, 22, maintain that average. The dioceses that fall below it are: Easton, 21; Western Michigan, 21; Central New York, 20; Maine, 20; New Hampshire, 20; Ohio, 20; Rhode Island, 20; Western New York, 19; Albany, 18; Indianapolis, 18; Southern Ohio, 18; Michigan, 17, and Michigan City, 9. Albany, Indianapolis, Central Pennsylvania, Fond du Lac and Michigan City, do not equal The great urban dioceses are: New their record of last year. Marquette, New York, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts and Hampshire and Washington hold their Chicago. Here there were last year 6,181 own; the other 22 show gains over last marriages and 12,189 infant baptisms, the year, ranging from 1 baptism for every ratio being therefore one to 2.1. This 10 marriages in Ohio, Michigan and year there were 6,059 marriages and 13,- Southern Ohio, to 14 in Quincy. There 101 baptisms. The second term of the is nothing to indicate what chance ratio, which hereafter need alone be given, has carried Michigan City this year from was 2.2. There was gain in every one of one of the highest places to the lowest in the dioceses. New York and Chicago the whole Church. Especially gratifying showed an increase over the year before, is the progress recorded in Maine, Maryfrom 1.7 to 1.9; Massachusetts from 2 land, Springfield, New Jersey, Pittsburgh to 2.1; Pennsylvania, that is essentially and Easton.

THE URBAN DIOCESES.

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THE NORTHWEST.

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From the ten dioceses and districts of the Northwest beyond the Mississippi and east of the Pacific coast, we must once more eliminate South Dakota, where the almanacs have reported no marriages during the past three years. This omission is the more regrettable since South Dakota has the largest total of infant baptisms in the region, with the single exception of Minnesota. In the other nine dioceses or districts there were 1,324 marriages and 2,881 infant baptisms. ratio last year was 2.1; it is now almost 2.2. It is smaller, therefore, than in either the urban or the comparatively rural districts of the Northeast, and just a little below the average for the whole country. The best record here is made by North Dakota, with 40 baptisms for every 10 marriages. Thus gains the leadership held last year by Duluth, which now takes third place with 26, after Boisé, 30. Then follow, at some distance, Minnesota, 22; Nebraska, 22; Laramie, 20; Spokane, 20; Montana, 18, and Iowa, 15. The largest gain over last year is made in Spokane, which had then the lowest record of any diocese or district in the United States, with barely one baptism for every marriage, the position now held, with an even lower record, by Michigan City in the Northeast. Considerable gains are shown also in Boisé, Minnesota, and Montana. North Dakota has done a little better than last year. On the other hand, there has been a considerable decline in Duluth and a noticeable, though smaller, falling off in Nebraska, Laramie

and Iowa.

THE SOUTHEAST.

In the fifteen dioceses and districts south of the Potomac and east of the Mississippi (omitting Porto Rico) there were in the past year 1,956 marriages and 4,768 infant baptisms, showing a ratio well over 2.4, though less by a fraction of 1 per cent. than last year. The best record in this section was made this year, as last, by Asheville, where there were 46 baptisms for every 10 marriages; then followed Georgia with 35; North Carolina, 31; Southern Florida, 31; Florida, 30; East Carolina, 29; Tennessee, 29; Lexington, 26; South Carolina, 26, and Kentucky, 24 Thes ten show a better record than the general average of the Church. Virginia with 22 just reached the average. Below it were Southern Virginia, 21; West Virginia, 16; Mississippi, 15, and Alabama, 13. Comparing the record with that of last year, we find that Asheville, even in spite of its present good record, shows the greatest falling off. There has been a considerable decline in Alabama also. Mississippi, East Carolina, North Carolina,

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