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THE JEW AND HIS DAUGHTER.

ACT II., SCENE 1.

Bara. Thus, like the sad-presaging raven, that tolls The sick man's passport in her hollow beak, And in the shadow of the silent night Doth shake contagion from her sable wings, Vex'd and tormented runs poor Barabas With fatal curses towards these Christians. The incertain pleasures of swist-footed time Have ta'en their flight, and left me in despair ; And of my former riches rests no more But bare remembrance ; like a soldier's scar, That has no further comfort for his maim. -0, Thou, that with a fiery pillar ledd'st The sons of Israel through the dismal shades, Light Abraham's offspring ; and direct the hand Of Abigail this night I or let the day Turn to eternal darkness after this !-No sleep can fasten on my watchful eyes, Nor quiet enter my distemper'd thoughts, Till I have answer from my Abigail.

[Enter ABIGAIL above. Abig. Now have I happily espied a tino To search the plank my father did appoint; And here, behold, unseen, where I have found The gold, the pearls, and jewels, which he hid.

Bara. Now I remember those old women's words, Who in my wealth would tell me winter's tales, And speak of spirits and ghosts that glide by night About the place were treasure hath been hid : And now methinks that I am one of those ;

Give me the merchants of the Indian mines,
That traile in metal of the purest mould ;
The wealthy Moor, that in the eastern rocks
Without control can pick his riches up,
And in his house heap pearl like pebble-stones,
Receive them frce, and sell them by the weight;
Bags of fiery opals, sapphires, amethysts,
Jacinths, hard topaz, grass-green emeralds,
Beauteous rubies, sparkling diamonds,
And seld-seen costly stones of so great price,
As one of them, indifferently rated,
And of a carat of this quantity,
May serve, in peril of calamity,
To ransom great kings from captivity.
This is the ware wiserein consists my wealth ;
And thus mcthinks should men of juulgment framo
Their means of traffic from the vulgar trade,
Anil, as their wealth increaseth, so inclose
Infinite riches in a little room.
But now how stands the wind ?
Into what corner peers my halcyon's bill?
Ha ! to the east ? yes. See how stand the vanes-
East and by south: why, then, I hope my ships
I sent for Exypt and the bordering isles
Are gotten up by Nilus' winding banks ;
Mine argosy from Alexandria,
Loaden with spice and silks, now under sail,
Are smoothly gliding down by Candy-shore
To Malta, through our Mediterranean sea

THE JEW AND HIS DAUGHTER.

Act II., SCENE 1.

Dara. Thus, like the sad-presaging raven, that tolls The sick man's passport in lier lollow beak, And in the shadow of the silent night Doth shake contagion from her sable wings, Vex'd and tormented runs poor Barabas With fatal curses towards these Christians. The incertain pleasures of swift-footed time Have ta'en their flight, and left me in despair ; And of my former riches rests no more But bare remembrance ; like a soldier's scar, That has no further comfort for his maiin.--0, Thou, that with a fiery pillar ledd'st The sons of Israel through the dismal shades, Light Abraham's offspring ; and direct the hand Of Abigail this night! or let the day Turn to eternal darkness after this ! No sleep can fasten on my watchful eyes, Nor quiet enter my distemper'd thoughts, Till I have answer from my Abigail.

[Enter ABIGAIL above. Abig. Now have I happily espied a tino To search the plank my father did appoint; And here, behold, unseen, where I have found The gold, the pearls, and jewels, which he hid.

Bara. Now I remember those old women's words, Who in my wealth would tell me winter's tales, And speak of spirits and ghosts that glide by night About the place were treasure hath been hid: And now methinks that I am one of those ;

were

SO

For, whilst I live, here lives my sonl's sole hope,
And, when I die, here shall my spirit walk.
Abig. Now that my father's fortune

good
As but to be about this happy place!
'Tis not so happy : yet, when we parted last,
He said he would attend me in the morn.
Then, gentle Sleep, where'er his body rests,
Give charge to Morpheus that he may dream
A golden dream, and of the sudden wake,
Come and receive the treasure I have found.

Baran Bueno para todos mi ganado no era :
As good go on, as sit so sadly thus.-
But stay: what star shines yonder in tho east !
The loadstar of my life, if Abigail.-
Who's there?

Abig. Who's that?
Bara. Peace, Abigail ! 'tis I.
Abig. Then, father, here receive thy happiness.
Bara. Hast thou't ?
Abig. Here. [throws doron bags] Hast thou't?
There's more, and more, and more.

Bara. O my girl,
My gold, my fortune, my felicity,
Strength to my soul, death to mine enemy;
Welcome the first beginner of my bliss !
O Abigail, Abigail, that I had thee here too !
Then my desires were fully satisfied :
But I will practise thy enlargement thence :
O girl ! O gold ! O beauty ! 0 my bliss !

[Hugs the bags.
Abig. Father, it draweth towards midnight now,
And 'bout this time the nuns begin to wake;
To shun suspicion, therefore, let us part.

Bara. Farewell, my joy, and by my fingers take A kiss from him that sends it from his soul.

[Exit ABIGAIL above. Now, Phæbus, ope the eyelids of the day, And, for the raven, wake the morning lark, That I may bover with her in the air, ing o'er these, as she does o'er her young.

THE JEW'S LESSON IN CHRISTIAN CHARITY.

ACT II., SCENE 2.

Bara. Now let me know thy name, and therewithal Thy birth, condition, and profession.

itha, Faith, sir, my birth is but mean ; my name's Ithamore; my profession what you please.

Bara. Hast thou no trade ? then listen to my words, And I will teach (thee) that shall stick by thee : First, be thou void of these affections, Compassion, love, vain hope, and heartless fear; Be mov'd at nothing, see thou pity none, But to thyself smile when the Christians moan.

Itha. O, brave master! I worship your nose for this.

Bara. As for myself, I walk abroad o' nights,
And kill sick people groaning under walls :
Sometimes I go about and poison wells ;
And now and then, to cherish Christian thieves,
I am content to lose some of my crowns,
That I may, walking in my gallery,
See 'em go pinion'd along by my door.
Being young, I studied physic, and began
To practise first upon the Italian ;
There I enrich'd the priests with burials
And always kept the sexton's arms in ure

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