The Military Obligation of Citizenship

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Princeton University Press, 1915 - Počet stran: 76
The first of these addresses was delivered at Princeton, April 15, 1915: the second at the lake Mohonk conference, May 20, 1915; the third at St. Paul's school, June 15, 1915. cf. Pref.

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Strana 18 - ... thousand men, unable to protect our baggage and Magazines, their security depending on a good countenance, and a want of enterprise in the enemy ; we should not have been the greatest part of the war inferior to the enemy, indebted for our safety to their inactivity, enduring frequently the mortification of seeing inviting opportunities to ruin them pass unimproved for want of a force, which the country was completely able to afford ; to see the Country ravaged, our towns burnt, the inhabitants...
Strana 16 - Had we formed a permanent army in the beginning, which, by the continuance of the same men in service, had been capable of discipline, we never should have had to retreat with a handful of men across the Delaware in 1776, trembling for the fate of America, which nothing but the infatuation of the enemy could have saved...
Strana 60 - Convinced as I am, that a government is the murderer of its , citizens, which sends them to the field uninformed and untaught, where they are to meet men of the same age and strength, mechanized by education and discipline for battle...
Strana 15 - ... to the troops. While I record, with delight, facts which maintain our native and national courage, I feel a horror lest demagogues, who flourish in a representative system of government (the best, when virtue rules, the wit of man can devise) shall avail themselves of the occasional testimony to produce a general result.
Strana 27 - ... preceding the entrance of our troops into the capital of Mexico. Successes so brilliant would apparently denote the perfection of military policy, but, paradoxical as it may seem, official documents establish the fact that they were achieved under the very same system of laws and executive orders which in the preceding foreign war had led to a series of disasters culminating in the capture and destruction of our capital. The explanation of this paradox is to be found partly in the difference...
Strana 40 - Convinced as I am that a government is the murderer of its citizens which sends them to the field uninformed and untaught, where they are to meet men of the same age and strength, mechanized by education and discipline for battle, I can not withhold my denunciation of its wickedness and folly.
Strana 42 - We must depend in every time of national peril, in the future as in the past, not upon a standing army, nor yet upon a reserve army, but upon a citizenry trained and accustomed to arms. It will be right enough, right American policy, based upon our accustomed principles and practices, to provide a system by which every citizen who will volunteer for the training may be made familiar with the use of modern arms, the rudiments of drill and maneuver, and the maintenance and sanitation of camps.
Strana 27 - Monterey, Buena Vista, the siege and capture of Vera Cruz, Cerro Gordo, Contreras, Churubusco, and El Molino del Rey contributed an unbroken chain of victories preceding the entrance of our troops into the capital of Mexico. Successes so brilliant would apparently denote the perfection of military policy, but, paradoxical as it may seem, official documents establish the fact that they were achieved under the very same system of laws and executive orders which in the preceding foreign war had led...
Strana 5 - It has been well said that in the sudden onrush of modern war undeveloped military resources are of no more use than an undeveloped gold mine in Alaska would be in a panic on Wall Street. The comparison is not overdrawn. You must remember, all of you, that this country has never yet engaged in war with a first-class power prepared for war.
Strana 31 - It may be laid down as an axiom, based upon historical proof, that any Government which foregoes its rights to compulsory military service, becomes more and more enslaved by depending solely upon voluntary military service induced by gifts of money, land, and clothing. DICTATORIAL POWERS GRANTED TO WASHINGTON. The campaign of 1776 demonstrated in a remarkable manner the dangers to which liberty was exposed by an unwise and feeble military policy. In his letter of September 24, Washington referred...

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