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your diligence has gained my approbation, and that of my partners generally. We are highly pleased at your industry and perseverance, and present you with this note as a small token of our approbation.' He added, “Depend upon it, if

you continue as you have commenced, you will not go unrewarded.' I thanked Mr. Rumbold for his kindness, and having promised to serve the firm to the utmost of my power, I retired. I did not look at the amount of the note in the parlour, but I fully concluded that it was present of five pounds. I thought this a large sum for a present; but, judge of my surprise when on opening it I found the word • Twenty' written on it. Yes, my dear parents, it was a twenty-pound note that was given to me; and I send it to you that you may be enabled to purchase some of those comforts you denied yourselves for my sake when I was young. I hope I may be enabled to send you still more on a future day; it will be the greatest pleasure of my life to add to your comforts. Hoping that it will give you as much pleasure to receive this note as I have in sending it, I remain, my dear parents,

Your affectionate Son,

“ JOHN MORPHEW.”

When Mr. Morphew perceived that I had read this letter, he asked, with evident pride, what I thought of its contents.

“ It is just such a letter," I replied, “as I should have expected John would have written, so soon as it was put into his power to administer to your comforts : and depend upon it this will not be the last time you will thus hear of John : the more he has it in his power, the more he will add to your comforts."

Many a time since the date of the first act of kindness shown to his parents did John Morphew add to their comforts. Year after year he was rewarded by his employers, and year

after

year did he offer to his parents the fruits of his industry. The language of his heart at all times seemed to be:

“Nature brought me in your debt,
And still I owe you for your cares and fears;

Your pains and charges I do not forget ;
Besides the interest of many years.

What way is there to make requital for it?
Much I shall leave unpaid, do what I can.

Should I be then unthankful ? I abhor it;
The will may serve when pow'r wants in man.”- Wither.

For the last few years of their lives John Morphew's parents were enabled by his bounty to live in comparative affluence. During that time the firm had ceased to reward him annually for his diligence, they had taken him into partnership with them. He was, therefore, become a man of considerable importance and wealth, and was enabled to provide bountifully for his parents. Up to the hour of their deaths he was unceasing in his tender care for them, and when they died he paid the last tribute of respect to them in a way that did honour to his filial piety. I saw him drop the last tear over each of their graves, and never did I feel prouder of a friend than I did of John Morphew on those melancholy occasions. I felt that he had acted as a son should act towards his parents — that he had “honoured his father and mother," and that a blessing from on high would rest upon his head. “ Honour thy father and thy mother, that thy days may be long in the land which the Lord thy God giveth thee.”

Such is the Divine promise, and it has been verified in the history of my friend John Morphew: he still lives, and is had in honour by all who have any knowledge of his character. I should not be surprised, indeed, one day to find that John Morphew was made “ Lord Mayor of London.” If he is, no one will congratulate him on his honours with greater sincerity than myself, for there is none of my youthful companions now living whom I hold in higher estimation.

Such was the friend whom poor Matt Norden wished myself and my companions to repudiate. Matt himself has seen his error, and confessed it: “ he was more worthy of your friendship,” he once observed to me, " than I was.” Matt also saw the folly of seeking friends merely because they happened to possess money, or were born of noble ancestors. “ Merit alone," he said to me on one occasion, “should be the test of friendship.” It was the “merit” of John Morphew that endeared him to me in my youth, and which renders him still dear to me as well as to all his friends. Adopting the language of the quaint Fuller, in his description of “ The True Gentleman," I may say with regard to John Morphew, “What if he cannot, with the Hevenninghams of Suffolk, count five-andtwenty knights of his family, or tell sixteen knights successively with the Tilneys of Norfolk, or, with the Nauntons, show where their ancestors had seven hundred pounds a year before the Conquest, yet he hath endeavoured, by his own deserts, to ennoble himself. Thus valour makes him son to Cæsar ; learning entitles him kinsman to Tully; and piety reports him nephew to godly Constantine.”

CHAP. VII.

A FABLE. THE STORY OF ALNASCHAR, THE FABLE AND STORY OF

UNIVERSAL APPLICATION.-A TALE FROM THEOCRITUS.- PRED SHERBOURNE. - The ChARACTER OF HIS FATHER. - Fred's EXPECTATIONS. - INTENDS TO LEAD THE LIFE OF A GENTLEMAN. — COMMENCES GENTLEMANSHIP. THE OBJECT OF ENVY AMONG HIS COMPANIONS. THE DEATH OF HIS FATHER. - HIS DISAPPOINTMENT. - RESOLVES TO LEAVB ROSE COTTAGE TO SEEK HIS FORTUNE.- MY PARTING ADVICE TO HIM. - BECOMES A BANKRUPT.-PLACED IN A COUNTING-HOUSE. HIS REGRET.-LINES ON CONTENTMENT.

FABLE relates, that

“One evening, as a simple swain

His flock attended on the plain,
The shining bow he chanced to spy,
Which warns us when a shower is nigh.
With brightest rays it seem'd to glow ;
Its distance eighty yards or so.
This bumpkin had it seems been told
The story of the cup of gold,
Which fame reports is to be found
Just where the rainbow meets the ground;
He therefore felt a sudden itch
To seize the goblet and be rich;
Hoping, yet hopes are oft but vain,
No more to toil through wind and rain,
But sit indulging by the fire,
Midst ease and plenty, like a squire.
He mark'd the very spot of land
On which the rainbow seem'd to stand,
And stepping forwards at his leisure,
Experted to have found the treasure.
Biit as he moved, the colour'd ray
Still chang'd its place and slipp'd away,
As seeming his approach to shun.
From walking he began to run:
But all in vain, it still withdrew
As nimbly as he could pursue.
At last, through many a bog and lake,
Rough, craggy road, and thorny brake,
It led the easy fool, till night
Approach'd, then vanish'd in his sight,
And left him to compute his gains,
With naught but labour for his pains." - WILKIE,

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