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the same style, if not in a superior style, to his deceased parent.

“ That may be," Fred interrupted; "but you, and all my companions, know how I intended to live when I came into my fortune. I dare say I shall be taunted by many of them, although I feel that

you

will not act thus towards me. However, I may yet show that I can live as I intended. Money, you know, gets money; and my mind is made up to leave this cottage and go to London, where I may use what I have to advantage. I am my own master now, at all events, and if there is any possibility of becoming rich, I will be so in a few

years.

You may yet see me drive through our village in a carriage, instead of the old chaise now in the stable.”

It was in vain that I endeavoured to change Fred Sherbourne's views, and

to press upon him the lesson of contentment. His mind was made up; he would employ the few thousands left him in getting more, so that he might live in the style he desired. In a few weeks, indeed, all the goods and chattels of Rose Cottage were disposed of by auction, and Fred took his departure for London. As he shook me by the hand for the last time, I ventured to whisper into his ear this advice: “Whatever you embark in, Fred, be careful; if you do not act prudently, you may lose the wealth which God has bestowed upon you, instead of adding thereto.”

Fred Sherbourne promised to act upon my advice. “Depend upon it,” he said, “I will be careful; and you may rest assured of one day seeing me again as I wish to be seen.” He promised to write to let me know how he succeeded, but week after week, and month after month passed away, and nothing was heard of him. I often thought of him, and wondered that he did not write. Sometimes I concluded that he was getting so wealthy that he had forgotten his old companions, and at others I would fancy that his expectations had again been disappointed, and that therefore he was ashamed to write. My old companions, who had mostly left the vicinity in which we had been brought up together, used frequently to inquire by letter whether I had seen or heard any thing of “Frederick Sherbourne, Esquire," and whether I had had “ the honour of riding with him in his carriage and four.” As for themselves, they informed me that they could hear nothing of him: he was too great a man to let them discover him. At length, however, one of them, who resided in London, wrote to me thus:

“My dear Friend, “On reading the list of bankrupts, the other day, I saw this announcement: Sherbourne, Frederick, Leadenhall Street, merchant, to surrender October 19th, November 23. Solicitor, Mr. Harper, Old Jewry; official assignee, Mr. Grant, Coleman Street.' Can this be my old companion, Fred Sherbourne?' I thought to myself; and on conceiving the thought that it might be him, I immediately sallied out with the view of ascertaining. And, would you believe it? I found that it was our old companion, and that he has not only spent all his money, but is

also so much in debt that his creditors will not receive, at the most, more than the eighth part of their dues. I am sorry for our old friend, though he did sometimes despise us when he was in the expectation of his great wealth, as he used to call it. As for you, I know you will commiserate him, and seek to find out the garret to which he may have retreated. I cannot go so far as this, but if you should call upon me at any time for something to assist him, you will find both my heart and my pocket open. “I am, my dear Friend, “ Yours faithfully,

“ ARTHUR WARREN."

“ And so my worst fears are realised in reference to Fred Sherbourne's riches,” I ejaculated, as I laid down this letter. 6. He had better have been bred up to the profession his parent desired, for then he might yet possibly recover his reputation. As it is, I fear it is gone for ever: few of his old companions could relieve him to any great extent, and if they could, it would scarcely be wise. If he has run through thousands, it would not be very difficult for him to get rid of a few hundreds more.

All that can be done is to assist him to some light employment, which he may be capable of undertaking ; but this, I fear, will ill accord with his former notions. He may even despise such assistance.”

Fred Sherbourne's pride, however, was humbled. One of his old companions, on being written to, obtained him a situation in a countinghouse, where he now labours for a livelihood, and which he accepted with thankfulness. Often has he expressed his regret that he had not been contented with his lot, for then he might have lived free from all anxiety and care.

It appears, indeed, that Fred Sherbourne might have been an independent man, in the true sense of the word, had he been disposed to have lived on the means left him by his father. Ambition was his bane: he desired wealth, and he grasped poverty. Well had it been for him, if he would have adopted these sentiments of the poet :

“ My mind to me a kingdom is;

Such perfect joy therein I find,
As far exceeds all earthly bliss,

That God or Nature hath assign'd.
Though much I want that most would have,

Yet still my mind forbids to crave.
“ Content I live; this is my stay;

I seek no more than may suffice:
I press to bear no haughty sway;

Look, what I lack my mind supplies.
Lo! thus I triumph like a king,

Content with that my mind doth bring.
" I see how plenty surfeits oft,

And hasty climbers soonest fall;
I see that such as sit aloft

Mishap doth threaten most of all;
These get with toil, and keep with fear;

Such cares my mind could never bear.
“No princely pomp, nor wealthy store,

No force to win a victory,
No wily wit to salve a sore,

No shape to win a lover's eye.
For none of these I yield as thrall;
For why? my mind despiseth all." -DYER.

CHAP. VIII.

THE REFLECTING BOY : LINES FROM WORDSWORTH. - FRED SHER

BOURNE'S CONJECTURES. - ALFRED ROWLAND. HIS CHARACTER VINDICATED BY MYSELF. - A GAME OF CRICKET. - ALFRED'S ARRIVAL ON THE CRICKET GROUND. HIS PLEA FOR HIS LATE APPEARANCE. DISCOURSES ON THE WONDERS OF CREATION, FRED SHERBOURNE'S INTERRUPTION. - ALFRED'S REJOINDER.- ALFRED'S EXAMPLE FOLLOWED BY MYSELF. - OUR SOLITARY RAMBLES. -- JOINED OCCASIONALLY BY OUR COMPANIONS. -- FRED SHERBOURNE'S CONFESSION OF INFERIORITY, -- ALFRED'S REPUTATION.-LINES ON THE BEAUTIES OF THE MIND. THE ATTAINMENT OF KNOWLEDGE URGED. -THE HAPPY WARRIOR: LINES FROM WORDS WORTH,

“ He had received
A precious gift ; for as he grew in years,
With these impressions would he still compare
All his remembrances, thoughts, shapes, and forms;
And being still unsatisfied with aught
Of dimmer character, he thence attain'd
An active power to fasten images
Upon his brain; and on their pictured lines
Intensely brooded, ev'n till they acquired
The liveliness of dreams. Nor did he fail
While yet a child, with a child's eagerness
Incessantly to turn his ear and eye
On all things which the moving seasons brought
To feed such appetite -- nor this alone
Appeased his yearning: in the after day
Of boyhood, many an hour in caves forlorn,
And mid the hollow depths of naked crags
He sate ; and ev'n in their fixed lineaments,
Or from the power of a peculiar eye,
Or by creative feeling overborne,
Or by predominance of thought oppress'd,
Ev'n' in their fixed and steady lineaments,
He traced an ebbing and a flowing mind,
Expression ever varying."

WORDSWORTH.

“ Most likely he is gone to watch the setting of the sun,” said Fred Sherbourne, as he twirled his gold-headed cane in the faces of his companions. “Most likely he is gone to watch the setting of the sun. Or it may be,” he added, as

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