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My dog! what remedy remains,

Since, teach you all I can, I see you, after all my pains,

So much resemble man !

BEAU'S REPLY.

Sir, when I flew to seize the bird

In spite of your command,
A louder voice than yours I heard,

And harder to withstand.

You cried_forbear !_but in

my

breast A mightier cried—proceed !'Twas nature, sir, whose strong behest

Impellid me to the deed.

Yet much as nature I respect,

I ventured once to break (As you perhaps may recollect)

Her precept for your sake;

And when your linnet on a day,

Passing his prison door,
Had flutter'd all his strength away,

And panting press’d the floor ;

Well knowing him a sacred thing,

Not destined to my tooth,
I only kiss'd his ruffled wing,

And lick'd the feathers smooth.

Let
my

obedience then excuse
My disobedience now,
Nor some reproof yourself refuse

From your aggrieved bow-wow;

If killing birds be such a crime,

(Which I can hardly see,)
What think you, sir, of killing time

With verse address'd to me?

ANSWER

TO

STANZAS ADDRESSED TO LADY HESKETH,

BY MISS CATHARINE FANSHAWE,

IN RETURNING A POEM OF MR. COWPER'S, LENT TO HER ON CONDITION

SHE SHOULD NEITHER SHOW IT, NOR TAKE A COPY.

1793.

To be remember'd thus is fame,

And in the first degree ;
And did the few like her the same,

The press might sleep for me.
So Homer, in the memory stored

Of many a Grecian belle,
Was once preserved—a richer hoard,

But never lodged so well.

TO THE

SPANISH ADMIRAL COUNT GRAVINA, ON HIS TRANSLATING THE AUTHOR'S SONG ON A ROSE INTO

ITALIAN VERSE.

1793.

My rose, Gravina, blooms anew;

And steep'd not now in rain,
But in Castalian streams by you,

Will never fade again.

ON FLAXMAN'S PENELOPE.

SEPT. 1793.

The suitors sinn'd, but with a fair excuse,
Whom all this elegance might well seduce;
Nor can our censure on the husband fall,
Who, for a wife so lovely, slew them all.

ON RECEIVING

HEYNE'S VIRGIL FROM MR. HAYLEY.

Ост. 1793. .

I SHOULD have deem'd it once an effort vain
To sweeten more sweet Maro's matchless strain,
But from that error now behold me free,
Since I received him as a gift from thee.

TO MARY.

AUTUMN OF 1793.

The twentieth year is well nigh past,
Since first our sky was overcast ;-
Ah would that this might be the last !

My Mary!
Thy spirits have a fainter flow,
I see thee daily weaker grow ;-
'Twas my distress that brought thee low,

My Mary!

Thy needles, once a shining store,
For

my sake restless heretofore,
Now rust disused, and shine no more,

My Mary! For though thou gladly wouldst fulfil The same kind office for me still, Thy sight now seconds not thy will,

My Mary! But well thou play'dst the housewife's part, And all thy threads with magic art Have wound themselves about this heart,

My Mary! Thy indistinct expressions seem Like language utter'd in a dream; Yet me they charm, whate'er the theme,

My Mary!

Thy silver locks, once auburn bright,
Are still more lovely in my sight
Than golden beams of orient light,

My Mary! For could I view nor them nor thee, What sight worth seeing could I see? The sun would rise in vain for me,

My Mary! Partakers of thy sad decline, Thy hands their little force resign; Yet gently prest, press gently mine,

My Mary! Such feebleness of limbs thou provest, That now at every step thou movest Upheld by two, yet still thou lovest,

My Mary! And still to love, though prest with ill, In wintry age to feel no chill, With me is to be lovely still,

My Mary! But ah! by constant heed I know, How oft the sadness that I show, Transforms thy smiles to looks of woe,

My Mary! And should my future lot be cast With much resemblance of the past, Thy worn-out heart will break at last,

My Mary!

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