The Letters of Junius: With Notes and Illustrations, Historical, Political, Biographical, and Critical, Svazek 2

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William P. and L. Blake. H. Maxwell, printer., 1804
 

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Strana 45 - King can do no wrong, is admitted without reluctance. We separate the amiable, good-natured prince from the folly and treachery of his servants, and the private virtues of the man from the vices of his government. Were it not for this just distinction, I know not whether your Majesty's condition, or that of the English nation, would deserve most to be lamented. I would prepare your mind for a favorable reception of truth, by removing every painful, offensive idea of personal reproach.
Strana 123 - And re-turn; make knots, and undo them; Give forked counsel; take provoking gold On either hand, and put it up; these men, He knew, would thrive with their humility.
Strana 41 - SIR, IT is the misfortune of your life, and originally the cause of every reproach and distress which has attended your government, that you should never have been acquainted with the language of truth until you heard it in the complaints of your people.
Strana 153 - That great lawyer, that honest man, saw your •whole conduct in the light that I do. After years of ineffectual resistance to the pernicious principles introduced by your Lordship, and uniformly supported by your humble friends upon the bench, he determined to quit a court, whose proceedings and decisions he could neither assent to with honour, nor oppose with success.
Strana 39 - ... when, instead of sinking into submission, they are roused to resistance, the time will soon arrive, at which every inferior consideration must yield to the security of the sovereign, and to the general safety of the state. There is a moment of difficulty and danger, at which flattery and falsehood can no longer deceive, and simplicity itself can no longer be misled.
Strana 44 - ... lessons you received in your youth, and to form the most sanguine hopes from the natural benevolence of your disposition. We are far from thinking you capable of a direct deliberate purpose to invade those original rights of your subjects on which all their civil and political liberties depend. Had it been possible for us to entertain a suspicion so...
Strana 66 - ... of view in which it particularly imports your majesty to consider the late proceedings of the house of commons. By depriving a subject of his birthright they have attributed to their own vote an authority equal to an act of the whole legislature ; and, though perhaps not with the same motives, have strictly followed the example of the long parliament, which first declared the regal office useless, and soon after, with as little ceremony, dissolved the house of lords. The same pretended power...
Strana 52 - Animated by the favour of the people on one side, and heated by persecution on the other, his views and sentiments changed with his situation. Hardly serious at first, he is now an enthusiast.
Strana 148 - Your zeal in the cause of an unhappy Prince was expressed with the sincerity of wine, and some of the solemnities of religion.* This, I conceive, is the most amiable point of view in which your character has appeared. Like an honest man, you took that part in politics which might have been expected from your birth, education, country, and connections.
Strana 46 - You ascended the throne with a declared, and, I doubt not, a sincere resolution of giving universal satisfaction to your subjects. You found them pleased with the novelty of a young prince, whose countenance promised even more than his words ; and loyal to you, not only from principle, but passion. It was not a cold profession of allegiance to the first magistrate; but a partial, animated attachment to a favourite prince, the natiVe of their country.

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