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PROCEEDINGS

OF

THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES,

AT THE FIRST SESSION OF THE SIXTH CONGRESS, BEGUN AT THE CITY OF

PHILADELPHIA, DECEMBER 2, 1799.

Monday, December 2, 1799.

that, in the absence of the Vice PRESIDENT, they The first session of the sixth Congress, conform- have elected Samuel Livermore President of

the Senate pro tempore. ably to the Constitution, commenced this day, and the Senate assembled, in their Chamber, at the

Resolved, That each Senator be supplied, durcity of Philadelphia.

ing the present session, with three such newspa

pers, printed in any of the States, as he may choose, PRESENT:

provided, that the same be furnished at the rate John LANGDON, from New Hampshire;

usual for the annual charge of such papers. BENJAMIN GOODHUE, from Massachusetts ; A message from the House of Representatives THEODORE Foster, from Rhode Island; informed the Senate that a quorum of the House

James HilLHOUSE and URIAH Tracy, from is assembled, and have elected THEODORE SengConnecticut;

WICK their Speaker. John LAURANCE and James Watson, from Ordered, That Messrs. Read and BINGHAM be New York;

a committee on the part of the Senate, together William Bingham, from Pennsylvania; with such committee as the House of RepresentaHUMPHREY MARSHALL, from Kentucky ; tives may appoint on their part, to wait on the Jacob READ, from South Carolina;

President of the United States, and notify him JAMES GUNN, from Georgia.

that a quorum of the two Houses is assembled, and Joseph ANDERSON, appointed a Senator by the ready to receive any communications that he may State of Tennessee, for the remainder of the term be pleased to make to them. for which their late Senator, Andrew Jackson, The President communicated a letter signed was appointed; ABRAHAM Baldwin, appointed a John Trumbull, presenting to the Senate of the Senator by the State of Georgia; John Brown, United States impressions of two prints of the appointed a Senator by the State of Kentucky; American Revolution, which he had lately caused Samuel DEXTER, appointed a Senator by the to be published; and the letter was read. State of Massachusetts; SAMUEL LIVERMORE, ap- Ordered, That it lie on the table. pointed a Senator by the State of New Hamp- The Senate adjourned to 11 o'clock to-morrow shire; and William Hill Wells, appointed a morning. Senator by the State of Delaware; severally produced their credentials, and took their seats in the Senate.

TUESDAY, December 3. The Vice President being absent, the Senate William Cocke, appointed a Senator by the proceeded to the election of a President pro tem- State of Tennessee, and James SCHUREMAN, appore

, as the Constitution provides, and Samuel pointed a Senator by the State of New Jersey, in LIVERMORE was chosen.

the room John Rutherfurd, resigned, severally Ordered, That Mr. Read administer the oath produced their credentials, were qualified, and took required by law to the President of the Senate pro their seats in the Senate. tempore.

HENRY LATIMER, from the State of Delaware, The President administered the oath, as the and James Ross, from the State of Pennsylvania, law prescribes, to Messrs. AndERSON, Baldwin, severally attended. Brown, Dexter, and Wells.

A message from the House of Representatives Ordered, That the Secretary wait upon the informed the Senate that a quorum of the House PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED States, and acquaint is assembled, and have appointed a joint comhim that a quorum of the Senate is assembled, mittee on their part, together with such committee and that, in the absence of the Vice PRESIDENT, as the Senate may appoint on theirs, to wait on they have elected SAMUEL LIVERMORE President the President of the United States, and notify of the Senate pro tempore.

bim that a quorum of the two Houses is assembled, Ordered, That the Secretary acquaint the House and ready to receive any communications that he of Representatives that a quorum of the Senate may be pleased to make to them. is assembled and ready to proceed to business, and Mr. Read reported from the joint committee

SENATE.

Proceedings.

DECEMBER, 1799.

appointed for the purpose, that they had waited The Message and papers therein referred to were on the President of the United States, and had no- read. tified him that a quorum of the two Houses of Ordered, That they lie for consideration, and Congress were assembled ; and that the President that the Message and papers be printed for the use of the United States acquainted the committee, of the Senate. that he would meet the two Houses, this day, at 12 Mr. ANDERSON presented the petition of Samo'clock, in the Chamber of the House of Repre- uel Glass and others, praying compensation for a sentatives.

number of horses, stated to have been stolen from A message from the House of Represeutatives them by certain Indians on the frontiers; which informed the Senate that the House are now ready was read, and referred to Messrs. ANDERSON, to meet the Senate, in the Chamber of that House, Hillhouse, and GOODHUE, to consider and report to receive such communications as the President thereon to the Senate. of the United States shall be pleased to make to them. Whereupon the Senate repaired to the Cham

Friday, December 6. ber of the House of Representatives, for the pur- Mr. Dexter notified the Senate, that he should, pose above expressed.

on Monday next, ask leave to bring in a bill to reThe Senate ihen returned to their own Cham- vive the act, entitled, "An act for the relief of perber, and a copy of the Speech of the President sons imprisoned for debt." of the United States, this day addressed to both Mr. Ross, from the committee appointed to Houses of Congress, was read. (For which, see draught an Address, in answer to the Speech of House Proceedings, post.)

the President of the United States, to the two Ordered, That Messrs. Ross, Read, and TRA- Houses of Congress at the opening of the session, CY, be a committee to report the draught of an made a report; which was read. Address to the President of the United States, in Ordered, That it lie for consideration. answer to his Speech this day to both Houses.

Ordered, That the Speech of the President of the United States, this day communicated to both

MONDAY, December 9. Houses of Congress, be printed for the use of the Elijah Paine, from the State of Vermont, atSenate.

tended. Resolved, That two Chaplains of different de

The PRESIDENT laid before the Senate a letter nominations, be appointed to Congress for the from Samuel Meredith, Treasurer, together with present session, one by each House, who shall in- his Specie, War, and Navy accounts, ending the terchange weekly. The Senate proceeded to the appointment of a 1799, and Navy and War accounts to September

31st of December, 1798, March 31st, and June 30th, Chaplain to Congress on their part, and the Right 30th, 1799; which were read. Reverend Bishop White was unanimously elected.

Ordered, That they lie on file.

Agreeably to notice given, Mr. Dexter had

leave to bring in a bill to revive the act, entitled, WEDNESDAY, December 4.

An act for the relief of persons imprisoned for The Senate assembled, but transacted no busi- debt,” which was read; and, by unanimous con

sent, the bill was read the second time.

Ordered, That it be referred to Messrs. DEXTER, THURSDAY, December 5.

LAURANCE, and Tracy, to consider and report

thereon to the Senate. JONATHAN DAYTON, appointed a Senator by the State of New Jersey, and Ray GREENE, appoint- the committee of the draught of an Address in

The Senate proceeded to consider the report of ed a Senator by the State of Rhode Island, severally produced their credentials, were qualified, and United States tu both Houses of Congress, at the

answer to the Speech of the President of the took their seats in the Senate.

A message from the House of Representatives opening of the session; which, being read in parinformed the Senate that the House concur in the agraphs, was adopted, as follows: resolution for the appointment of Chaplains, and

To the President of the United States : have elected the Rev. Doctor Ashbel Green a Accept, Sir, the respectful acknowledgments of the Chaplain to Congress on their part.

Senate of the United States for your Speech delivered The following Message was received from the to both Houses of Congress at the opening of the presPRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES :

ent session.

While we devoutly join you in offering our thanks Gentlemen of the Senate, and

to Almighty God, for the return of health to our cities, Gentlemen of the House of Representatives :

and for the general prosperity of the country, we canI transmit to Congress certain documents which have not refrain from lamenting that the arts and calumnies relation to the communications made on Tuesday, on of factious, designing men have excited open rebellion the subjects of the insurrection in Pennsylvania, the a second time in Pennsylvania ; and thereby compelled renewal of commerce with St. Domingo, and the mis- the employment of military force to aid the civil authorsion to the French Republic.

ity in the execution of the laws. We rejoice that your JOHN ADAMS.

vigilance, energy, and well-timed exertions, have crushUNITED STATES, December 5, 1799.

ed so daring an opposition, and prevented the spreading tended. To which the PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED States The bill to revive the act, entitled "An act for made the following reply:

ness.

DECEMBER, 1799.

Proceedings.

SENATE.

ness.

of such treasonable combinations. The promptitude and success and satisfaction in your deliberations on the means zeal displayed by the troops called to suppress this in- which have a tendency to promote and extend our nasurrection deserve our highest commendation and praise, tional interests and happiness; and I assure you that, and afford a pleasing proof of the spirit and alacrity with in all your measures directed to those great objects, you which our fellow-citizens are ready to maintain the au- may, at all times, rely with the highest confidence on thority of our excellent Government.

my cordial co-operation. Knowing, as we do, that the United States are sin. The praise of the Senate, so judiciously conferred on cerely anxious for a fair and liberal execution of the the promptitude and zeal of the troops, called to supTreaty of Amity, Commerce, and Navigation, entered press the insurrection, as it falls from so high authority, into with Great Britain, we learn, with regret, that the must make a deep impression, both as a terror to the progress of adjustment has been interrupted, by a dif- disobedient, and an encouragement of such as do well. ference of opinion among the commissioners. We

JOHN ADAMS. hope, however, that the justice, the moderation, and the UNITED STATES, December 10, 1799. obvious interests of both parties, will lead to satisfactory The Senate returned to their own Chamber, and explanations, and that the business will then to an amicable close of all differences and demands be- proceeded to the consideration of Executive busitween the two countries. We are fully persuaded that the Legislature of the United States will cheerfully enable you to realize your assurances of performing, on

WEDNESDAY, December 11. our part, all engagements under our treaties, with

NATHANIEL CHIPMAN, from the State of Verpunctuality, and the most scrupulous good faith.

mont, attended. When we reflect upon the uncertainty of the result The PRESIDENT laid before the Senate a report of the late mission to France, and upon the uncommon from the Commisioners of the Sinking Fund; nature, extent, and aspect, of the war now raging in which was read. Europe—which affects materially our relations with the Powers at war, and which has changed the condition

Ordered, That it be printed for the use of the

Senate. of their colonies in our neighborhood-we are of opinion, with you, that it would be neither wise nor safe to from the Secretary for the Department of State,

The PRESIDENT laid before the Senate a report relax our measures of defence, or to lessen any of our preparations to repel aggression.

in pursuance of the “Act to revive and continue Our inquiries and attention shall be carefully direct- in force certain parts of the Act for the relief and ed to the various other important subjects which you protection of American seamen,' and to amend the bave recommended to our consideration; and from our same," with abstracts of all the returns, made by experience of your past administration, we anticipate, the collectors of the different ports, of registered with the highest confidence, your strenuous co-opera- seamen, and of impressed seamen ; together with tion in all measures which have a tendency to promote a report, exhibiting abstracts of the communicaand extend our national interests and happiness. tions received from the agents employed by virtue

SAMUEL LIVERMORE, of that act; which were read.

President of the Senate, pro tempore. Ordered That they be printed for the use of the Ordered, That the committee who prepared Senate. the Address wait on the President of the United Agreeably to notice given, Mr. Ross obtained States, and desire him to acquaint the Senate at leave to bring in a bill for reviving and continuing what time and place it will be most convenient for suits and proceedings in the Circuit Court for the him that it should be presented.

District of Pennsylvania; and the bill was read; Mr. Ross reported, from the committee, that and, by unanimous consent, it was read the second they had waited on the President of the United time and referred to Messrs. Ross, CHIPMAN, and States, and that he would receive the Address of Dexter, to consider and report thereon to the the Senate to-morrow at 12 o'clock, at his own

Senate. house.

Ordered, That the report of the Secretary for the Whereupon, Resolved, That the Senate will, to- Department of State, respecting impressed seamen, morrow, at 12 o'clock, wait on the President of the together with the papers therein referred to, be United Staies accordingly.

committed to Messrs. Read, Goodhue, and BingMr. Ross notified the Senate that he should to- HAM, to con ler and report thereon to the Sena morrow ask leave to bring in a bill to revive cer

Mr. DEXTER from the committee to whom was tain suits and process in the Circuit Court for the referred the bill, to revive the act entitled "An district of Pennsylvania, which have been discon- act for the relief of persons imprisoned for debt," tinued.

reported amendments, which were read and adopt-
ed'; and the bill being further amended,

Ordered, That it pass to a third reading.
Tuesday, December 10.
Agreeably to the resolution of yesterday, the Se-
pate waited on the President of the United States,

THURSDAY, December 12. and the President of the Senate, in their name, James Lloyd, from the State of Maryland, atpresented the Address then agreed to.

the relief of persons imprisoned for debt,” was read Gentlemen of the Senate:

the third time and passed. I thank you for this Address. I wish you all possible Mr. Greene presented the petition of Joseph

SENATE.

Proceedings.

DECEMBER, 1799.

nate.

Russell, jr., and others, stating that there is due to Mr. MARSHALL, from the committee to whom them from the United States interest on twenty-was referred the petition of Margaret Lapsley: four thousand four hundred dollars, according to a made report; which was read. resolution of Congress of the 18th March 1780, and Ordered, That it lie for consideration. praying payment; which petition was read and referred to Messrs. GREENE, TRACY, and Hill

Tuesday, December 17. HOUSE, to consider and report thereon to the Se

Ordered, That Mr. Wells be of the Joint ComJackson

and others, on the subject last mentioned, of the committee on the petition of Margaret LapsMr. Dexter presented the petitions of Michael mittee for Enrolled bills on the part of the Senate.

The Senate took into consideration the report which were referred to the same committee, tó consider and report thereon to the Senate.

ley, and agreed thereto. On motion, by Mr. Hillhouse, that a committee

Mr. Tracy, from the committee to whom was be appointed to revise the law, entitled “ An act referred the letter signed John Trumbull, of 20th to prohibit the carrying on the slave trade from September, 1798, reported a resolution, which was the United States to any foreign place or country,

" adopted, as follows: and to make such amendments or alterations as Resolved, That the Senate of the United States accept shall be found necessary more effectually to pre- the prints presented by John Trumbull, Esq., and that vent the carrying on such trade, it was agreed that their President be requested to inform him, that while this motion lie until to-morrow for consideration. they respect the delicacy which dictated the manner of

Ordered, That the letter signed John Trumbull, offering this elegant present, they consider their country communicated on the 2d inst., be referred to honored by the genius of one of her sons, by whom Messrs. Tracy, LAURANCE, and Watson, to con

these prints are happily designed, to perpetuate two sider and report thereon to the Senate.

memorable scenes in her progress to independence, and Mr. Anderson presented the petition of Dan- to preserve in lively recollection the names and virtues

of heroes who fell in her defence. iel Smith, praying compensation for a negro, and also for several horses, stated to have been stolen

Ordered, That Messrs. DAYTON, MARSHALL, by the Indians; which was read, and referred to and Tracy, be a committee to prepare and report the committee appointed the 5th inst., on the peti- a bill providing for the renewal of the certificates tion of Samuel Glass and others, to consider and of the debt of the United States which have been report thereon to the Senate.

destroyed or lost. Mr. Marshall presented the petition of Margaret Lapsley, praying the renewal of certain cer

WEDNESDAY, December 18. tificates therein mentioned, and stated to have been

The Senate transacted no business to-day. lost; and the petition was read, and referred 10 Messrs. MARSHALL, Tracy, and Dayton, to consider and report thereon to the Senate. Ordered, That Messrs. TRACY, LAURANCE, READ,

THURSDAY, December 19. DEXTER, and Ross, be a committee to take into The following Message was received from the consideration that part of the Speech of the Pre- PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES: sident of the United States which recommends a Gentlemen of the Senate, and revision and amendment of the judiciary system,

Gentlemen of the House of Representatives : and that they have leave to report by bill, bills, or

The letter herewith transmitted will inform you that otherwise.

it has pleased Divine Providence to remove from this life our excellent fellow-citizen GEORGE WASHINGTON,

by the purity of his character, and a long series of serFRIDAY, December 13.

vices to his country, rendered illustrious through the Mr. Ross from the committee to whom was

world. It remains for an affectionate and grateful peoreferred the bill for reviving and

continuing suits ple

, in whose hearts he can never die, to pay suitable honors to his memory.

JOHN ADAMS. and proceedings in the Circuit Court for the district of Pennsylvania, reported amendments; which

UNITED STATES, December 19, 1799. were read and agreed to, and the bill was amend The Message and letter were read and ordered ed accordingly.

to lie for consideration. Ordered, That this bill pass to the third reading. A message from the House of Representatives

The Senate resumed the consideration of the informed the Senate that the House having remotion made yesterday respecting the law prohib- ceived intelligence of the death of their highlyiting the slave trade; and.

valued fellow-citizen, General George WashingOrdered, That Messrs. Hillhouse, Dexter, ton, and sharing the universal grief this distresand Read, be a committee to take the same into sing event must produce, have resolved that a consideration and report thereon to the Senate.

joint committee be appointed, to report measures suitable to the occasion, and expressive of the pro

found sorrow with which Congress is penetrated Monday, December 16.

on the loss of a citizen, first in war, first in peace, The bill for reviving and continuing suits and and first in the hearts of his countrymen; and, proceedings in the Circuit Court for the district of having appointed a committee on their part desire Pennsylvania was read the third time, and passed. I the concurrence of the Senate.

DECEMBER, 1799.

Proceedings.

SENATE.

The Senate proceeded to consider the foregoing God! his glory is consummated ; Washington yet lives resolution of the House of Representatives; where -on earth in his spotless example—his spirit is in upon,

heaven. Resolred, That they do concur therein, and that Let his countrymen consecrate the memory of the Messrs. Dayton, Bingham, Dexter, Gonn, Lau- heroic General, the patriotic Statesman, and the virtuous RANCE, TRACY, and Read, be the committee on Sage ; let them teach their children never to forget that the part of the Senate.

the fruit of his labors and his example are their inher. Resolred, That the Senate will wait on the Pre

itance.

SAMUEL LİVERMORE, sident of the United States, to condole with him

President of the Senate, pro tempore. on the distressing event of the death of General Ordered, That the committee who prepared the GEORGE WASHINGTON; and that a committee be Address wait on the President of the United States, appointed to prepare for that occasion, an Address and desire him to acquaint the Senate at what to the President of the United States, expressive time and place it will be most convenient for him of the deep regret of the Senate; and that this that it should be presented. committee consist of Messrs. DEXTER, Ross, and Mr. DEXTER reported, from the committee, that READ.

they had waited on the President of the United Resolred, That the chairs in the Senate Cham- States and that he had acquainted them that he ber be covered, and the room hung with black, would receive the Address of the Senate immeand that each member, and the officers of the Se- diately, at his own house. pate, go into mourning, by the usual mode of wear

Whereupon, the Senate waited on the Presiing a crape round the left arm, during the session. dent of the United States, and the President of the

Senate, in their name, presented the Address this

day agreed to. MONDAY, December 23.

To which the PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES Timothy BLOODWORTH, from the State of North made the following reply: Carolina, and John E. HOWARD, from the State Gentlemen of the Senate : of Maryland, severally attended.

I receive with the most respectful and affectionate Mr. Dexter, from the committee appointed for sentiments, in this impressive address, the obliging exthe purpose on the 18th inst., reported the draught pressions of your regard for the loss our country has of an Address to the President of the United sustained in the death of her most esteemed, beloved, States, on the death of General George Wash- and admired citizen. IXGTON; which being read in paragraphs, was In the multitude of my thoughts and recollections on adopted, as follows:

this melancholy event, you will permit me only to say,

that I have seen him in the days of adversity, in some To the President of the United States :

of the scenes of his deepest distress and most trying The Senate of the United States respectfully take perplexities ; I have also attended him in his highest ele. leave, sir, to express to you their deep regret for the loss vation, and most prosperous felicity, with uniform adtheir country sustains in the death of General GEORGE miration of his wisdom, moderation, and constancy. WASHINGTOS.

Among all our original associates in that memorable This event, so distressing to all our fellow-citizens, League of the Continent in 1774, which first expressmust be peculiarly heavy to you, who have long been ed the sovereign will of a free nation in America, associated with him in deeds of patriotism. Permit us, he was the only one remaining in the General Governsir, to mingle our tears with yours ; on this occasion it ment. Although, with a constitution more enfeebled is manly to weep. To lose such a man, at such a than his, at an age when he thought it necessary to crisis, is no common calamity to the world. Our coun- prepare for retirement, I feel myself alone, bereaved of try mourns her Father. The Almighty Disposer of hu- my last brother, yet I derive a strong consolation from man events has taken from us our greatest benefactor the unanimous disposition which appears, in all ages and and ornament. It becomes us to submit with reverence classes, to mingle their sorrow with mine, on this comto him who “maketh darkness his pavilion."

mon calamity to the world. With patriotic pride, we review the life of our Wash The life of our Washington cannot suffer by a comINGTON, and compare him with those of other countries, parison with those of other countries who have been who have been pre-eminent in fame. Ancient and most celebrated and exalted by fame. The attributes modern names are diminished before him. Greatness and decorations of royalty could have only served to and guilt have too often been allied; but his fame is eclipse the majesty of those virtues which made him, whiter than it is brilliant. The destroyers of nations from being a modest citizen, a more resplendent lumistood abashed at the majesty of his virtue. It reproved nary. Misfortune, had he lived, could hereafter have the intemperance of their ambition, and darkened the sullied his glory only with those superficial minds, who, splendor of victory. The scene is closed, and we are believing that characters and actions are marked by no longer anxious lest misfortune should sully his glory; success alone, rarely deserve to enjoy it. Malice could he has travelled on to the end of his journey and carried never blast his honor, and envy made him a singular with him an increasing weight of honor: he has depos- exception to her universal rule. For himself he had ited it safely, where misfortune cannot tarnish it, where lived enough to life, and to glory. For his fellow-citizens, malice cannot blast it. Favored of heaven, he departed if their prayers could have been answered, he would without exhibiting the weakness of humanity. Mag- have been immortal. For me his departure is at a nanimous in death, the darkness of the grave could not most unfortunate moment. Trusting, however, in the obscure his brightness.

wise and righteous dominion of Providence over the Such was the man whom we deplore. Thanks to passions of men, and the results of their councils and

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