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ing a brief account of the affair. We refer to the contest between Miller, Whig, and Thompson, Democrat, for a seat in Congress from Iowa. There were at that time but two congressional districts in the State and the contest occurred in the First district, of which Marion county was a part.

The election occurred in 1848; a new precinct called Kanesville, including the whole west part of the State, had been created; counting vote of this precinct Miller was elected; not counting it Thompson was elected. The returns of Kanesville were sent to Albia, and while there were stolen. The board of canvassers declared Thompson elected, and he accordingly took his seat in Congress; Miller contested, and after considerable investigation Congress voted in 1850 to refer the matter back to the people. A special election was held September 24, 1850, and Miller was elected by a majority of about six hundred votes.

While Miller was carrying on the contest for his seat in Congress, and Thompson was perseveringly holding on to the position, the friends of the respective candidates at home were carrying on a very heated controversy. The poll-books from Kanesville precinct which had been stolen were finally discovered in Judge Mason's saddle-bags. Judge Mason was accused of stealing them; he denied having any knowledge of how they came there, and there was much crimination and recrimination. The following extracts from the Whig organ at Des Moines, published in 1850, will afford some idea of the animus of that controversy:

"The case of Daniel F. Miller, Whig member of Congress from this district who contests the right of Mr. Thompson, Democrat, to a seat in the House of Representatives, has been referred to a committee appointed for that purpose, and they have unanimously declared that Mr. Miller is entitled to the seat. When the committee reported to the House that Mr. Miller was the Representative from Iowa, and not Mr. Thompson, the latter put in a plea that a majority of the votes were illegal, and those of aliens and minors, and asked the House to allow him ninety days more to secure testimony to support the ground which he assumes. The time has been granted. Would a fair Congress have allowed him further time? He has already had a year to collect evidence to support his case, and that should have satisfied both him and the House.

"Those conversant with the history of the election of members of Congress for this district in 1848, will remember the infamous trick of legerdemain resorted to by the friends of the Locofoco candidate, Mr. Thompson, to secure for him the election now contested by Mr. Miller. The poll-books of Kanesville precinct, giving Mr. Miller a large majority, were stolen from the clerk of Monroe county to whom they had been returned, and by that means Mr. Thompson obtained the certificate of election. The stolen pollbooks in a few days came to light. They are found at last in the hands of Mr. Thompson's counsel, Judge Mason, who accidentally let the secret out in the following way: During an interview between Mr. Miller and Judge Mason in reference to taking depositions in the contested case the Judge turned out for Mr. Miller's inspection some papers, and through mistake the veritable original poll-books. Mr. Miller detected them at once from the signatures of the elected officers, and charged the fact home to him. His honor stated that he had come by them honestly, but he was not at liberty to state how he got them. The books were examined by several persons who happened to be present to their satisfaction and returned to

Judge Mason's custody. Those present describe the scene as one long to be remembered.

"The disclosure of these facts shows what principles control the political action of the Democratic party of this State. The 'cutlerizing' of Harlan out of the office to which he was fairly elected, was a fraud upon the rights of the people. Will Congress permit Mr. Thompson to hold a seat obtained through such conduct? His acceptance of the certificate of election and the tenacity with which he retains the advantage thus unrighteously gained, show him to be willing to enjoy the fruits of the corrupt proceeding."

The Gazette of April 12, 1850, announces the result of the examination in Kanesville in the contested election case.

"The commissioners were in session ten days, and after a thorough examination as to the legality of the votes given to Miller, not one illegal vote could be found to have been polled against him. Messrs. Mason, Hall & Co's own witnesses proved so clear a case for Mr. Miller that he did not think it worth while to introduce any rebutting testimony. J. C. Hall was examined and testified that he did not know who took the poll-books out of the clerk's office; but after they were taken they were placed in his saddlebags and he gave them to Thompson."

With the exception of a few unimportant officers elected between 1845 and 1851, a full list of county officials who have served the county in times past, will be found in the following

OFFICIAL DIRECTORY.

The dates given refer to the time of election, the person elected taking his seat the first Monday in January following, with the exception of those elected prior to 1856.

1845.

County Commissioners-Conrad Walters, William Welch, David Durham. Commissioners' Clerk-Stanford Doud. Probate Judge-Francis A. Barker. Sheriff J. M. Walters. Treasurer-David T. Durham. Recorder-Reuben Lowry. Surveyor-Isaac B. Power. Assessor-Green T. Clark. Coroner-Wellington Nossaman.

1846.

Commissioners-Hugh Glenn, David Durham, Samuel Tibbott. Pro bate Judge-Francis A. Barker. Representative-Wm. Pilgrim. Sheriff -George Gillaspy. Recorder-J. F. Monohon. Recorder J. F. Monohon. Treasurer-David T. Durham. Coroner-Asa Koons. Assessor-Allen Lowe. Commissioners' Clerk-Joseph Clark. Surveyor-Claiborn Hall.

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1847.

Commissioner Thomas Pollock. Probate Judge-Claiborn Hall. Treasurer-Isaac Walters.

Commissioner-Martin Neal.

1848.

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Commissioner-James M. Brous. Probate Judge-Warren D. Everett.

1851.

County Judge-Joseph Brobst. Sheriff-Isaac Walters. RecorderClaiborn Hall. Surveyor-F. M. Frush. Coroner-Christopher Cox.

1852.

Clerk of Court-A. B. Miller. Prosecuting Attorney-John W. Alley.

1853.

Sheriff-P. T. Totten. Treasurer and Recorder-David Stanfield. Coroner-John Gamble.

1854.

Clerk-A. B. Miller. Prosecuting Attorney-A. Black.

1855.

County Judge-F. M. Frush. Sheriff-Jonathan Jones. Treasurer and Recorder-David Stanfield. Surveyor-William Kent. Coroner-G. W. Harsin.

1856.

Clerk-J. M. Bayley. Prosecuting Attorney-A. Black.

1857.

County Judge-F. M. Frush. Sheriff-J. Jones. Treasurer and Recorder-Wm. J. Ellis. Surveyor-H. W. Dyer. Coroner-G. W. McLean.

1858.

Clerk-J. B. Hamilton. Surveyor-T. J. Anderson.

1859.

County Judge-F. M. Frush. Sheriff-J. Jones. corder W. J. Ellis. Surveyor-C. B. Boydston.

Schools W. M. K. Cain.

Coroner-J. A. Burnett.

Treasurer and Re-
Superintendent of

1860.

Clerk-J. B. Hamilton. Superintendent of Schools-A. N. Currier.

1861.

County Judge-W. B. Young. Treasurer and Recorder-A. H. Viersen.

Sheriff-D. J. Boydston. Coroner-E. Fort.

Superintendent of Schools-Joseph White.

Surveyor-J. W. Main.

1862.

Clerk-George Kruck. Surveyor-John Frush.

1863.

County Judge-W. B. Young. Clerk-George Kruck. Treasurer and Recorder-E. F. Sperry. Sheriff-E. Jones. Coroner-W. M. Norris. Surveyor-E. B. Ruckman. Superintendent of Schools-J. W. Griffin.

1864.

Clerk-George Kruck. Recorder-J. M. Clark. Sheriff-W. M. Norris.

1865.

Representative-B. Van Leuven, J. D. Gamble. Judge-Joseph Brobst. Treasurer-W. T. Cunningham. Sheriff-A. White. Surveyor-D. M. Hamilton. Coroner-J. A. Welch. Superintendent of Schools—W. E.

White.

1866.

Recorder A. Hamrick. Sheriff-R. S. Hanks.

Clerk-Geo. Kruck. Surveyor-J. A. Caruthers.

1867.

Senator-Thos. McMillan. Representatives-B. G. Bowen, E. Meacham. Judge-Joseph Brobst. Treasurer-E. Barker. Sheriff-J. P. Vincent. Surveyor-J. A. Caruthers. Superintendent of Schools-D. F. Bonner. Coroner-H. B. Keefer.

1868.

Representative-D. T. Durham. Clerk-H. L. Bousquet. Recorder-A. Hamrick. Sheriff-J. P. Kelley. Coroner-W. H. H. Mutler.

1869.

Senator-J. M. Cathcart. Representatives-D. T. Durham, B. F. Keables. Auditor-Joseph Brobst. Treasurer-E. Baker. Sheriff J. P. Kelley. Surveyor-O. H. S. Kennedy. Superintendent of Schools—A. Yetter. Coroner-M. Wikle.

1870.

Clerk-H. L. Bousquet. Recorder-J. R. Broderick. Supervisors-S. L. Collins, S. Y. Gose, Wm. Blain.

1871.

Senator J. S. McCormick. Representatives-D. T. Durham, B. F. Keables. Auditor-B. R. Ewalt. Treasurer-E. Baker. Treasurer-E. Baker. Sheriff-J. P. Kelley. Supervisor-H. M. McCulley. Superintendent of Schools-Samuel Ridenour. Coroner-Giles Marsh. Surveyor-O. H. S. Kennedy.

1872.

Clerk-A. Hamrick. Recorder-S. H. Viersen. Supervisor-Daniel Sherwood.

1873.

Auditor-C. H. Robinson. Treasurer-R. M. Faris. Sheriff--L. W Crozier. Supervisor-H. D. Lucas. Superintendent of Schools--I. Mershon. Coroner-W. Allen. Surveyor-M. F. Marshall.

1874.

Clerk-A. Hamrick. Recorder-P. K. Bonebrake. Supervisor-H. F. Bousquet.

1875.

Senator J. L. McCormack. Representatives-J. B. Elliott, G. T. Clark. Auditor-C. H. Robinson. Treasurer-R. M. Faris. Sheirff-L. W. Crozier. Superintendent of Schools-A. Yetter. Surveyor-N. Watkins. Coroner-T. G. Carr. Supervisor-A. A. Welcher.

1876.

Clerk-A. Hamrick. Recorder-P. K. Bonebrake. Supervisor-J. B. Ely.

1877.

Representatives-Wm. M. Stone, J. B. Elliott. Auditor--C. H. Robinson. Superintendent of Schools-A. Yetter. Surveyor-N. J. Watkins. Supervisor-H. L. Bousquet. Coroner-E. W. Starr. Sheriff-T. R. Brown. Treasurer-R. M. Faris.

1878.

Recorder--A. N. Reed. Clerk--P. K. Bonebrake. Supervisor-A. A. Welcher. Coroner-W. H. Dean.

1879.

Senator-J. F. Greenlee. Representatives-L. N. Hayes, S. F. Prouty. Treasurer-J. H. Cloe. Auditor-A. M. Clark. Sheriff-E. P. Bradley. Superintendent of Schools-Z. T. Honnold. Surveyor-M. F. Marshall. Supervisor--D. P. Cathcart. Coroner-Henry Mason.

1880.

Clerk-Minos Miller. Recorder A. N. Reed. Supervisor-R. M.

Faris.

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