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276 BURNING LORD MANSFIELD'S LIBRARY.

ON THE SAME.

I.

WHEN wit and genius meet their doom

In all devouring flame,

They tell us of the fate of Rome,

And bid us fear the fame.

II.

O'er MURRAY's lofs the mufes wept,

They felt the rude alarm,

Yet blefs'd the guardian care that kept

His facred head from harm.

III.

There mem'ry, like the bee that's fed

From Flora's balmy ftore,

The quinteffence of all he read

Had treafur'd up before.

IV.

The lawless herd, with fury blind,

Have done him cruel wrong;

The flow'rs are gone-but still we find

The honey on his tongue.

THE

LOVE OF THE WORLD REPROVED;

OR,

HYPOCRISY DETECTED*.

THUS fays the prophet of the Turk-
Good muffulman, abstain from pork;

There is a part in ev'ry swine
No friend or follower of mine
May tafte, whate'er his inclination,
On pain of excommunication.
Such Mahomet's myfterious charge,
And thus he left the point at large.
Had he the finful part exprefs'd,
They might with fafety eat the reft;
But for one piece they thought it hard
From the whole hog to be debarr'd,
And fet their wit at work to find

What joint the prophet had in mind.

* It may be proper to inform the reader that this piece has already appeared in print, having found its way, though with fome unneceffary additions by an unknown hand, into the Leeds Journal, without the author's privity.

Much controversy straight arose—

These choose the back, the belly thofe;

By fome 'tis confidently faid

He meant not to forbid the head;
While others at that doctrine rail,
And piously prefer the tail.

Thus, confcience freed from ev'ry clog,
Mahometans eat up the hog.

You laugh-'tis well.-The tale applied May make you laugh on t'other fide. Renounce the world-the preacher cries. We do a multitude replies.

While one as innocent regards

A fnug and friendly game at cards;
And one, whatever you may fay,

Can fee no evil in a play;

Some love a concert, or a race;

And others-fhooting, and the chafe. Revil'd and lov'd, renounc'd and follow'd, Thus, bit by bit, the world is fwallow'd; Each thinks his neighbour makes too free, Yet likes a flice as well as he;

With fophiftry their fauce they sweeten, Till quite from tail to fnout 'tis eaten.

THE LILY AND THE ROSE.

I.

THE nymph must lose her female friend,

If more admir'd than fhe

But where will fierce contention end,

If flowers can difagree?

II.

Within the garden's peaceful fcene

Appear'd two lovely foes,

Afpiring to the rank of queen

The Lily and the Rofe.

III.

The Rofe foon redden'd into rage,
And, fwelling with difdain,
Appeal'd to many a poet's page
To prove her right to reign.

IV.

The Lily's height bespoke command

A fair imperial flow'r;

She feem'd defign'd for Flora's hand,

The fceptre of her pow'r.

V.

This civil bick'ring and debate
The goddess chanc'd to hear,
And flew to fave, ere yet too late,
The pride of the parterre—

VI.

Your's is, the faid, the nobler hue,
And your's the ftatelier mien;

And, till a third furpaffes you,
Let each be deem'd a queen.

VII.

Thus, footh'd and reconcil'd, each feeks

The fairest British fair;

The feat of empire is her cheeks,

They reign united there.

IDEM LATINE REDDITUM.

I.

HEU inimicitias quoties parit æmula forma,

Quam raro pulchræ, pulchra placere poteft?

Sed fines ultrà folitos difcordia tendit,

Cum flores ipfos bilis et ira movent.

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