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aded. I'wenty-second United States Infantry, is much bett Houses.—Two storehouses, one for subsistence stores, and quartermaster's stores, were erected last year under the superintend. ence of Captain Furey. Each one was placed 30 feet from the position called for by the plan, and only one side of each of these buildings, as to openings and doors, conformed to the plan. Upon the outside of

each building but one door is placed, and no other opening. These the buildings are poorly constructed in some respects. The foundations

constructed under the direction of this officer are defective. A careful e. and inspection developed the fact of great improvement thus far under the

new contractor. Nothing, however, but constant watchfulness will secure the kind of service due the Government. The old post is, in a measure, unfit for longer occupation. There are many things required to be done, but the garrison is so small in enlisted men present that an excuse was ready for every omission.

Fuel is furnished by contract, hay the same; but grain has heretofore been furnished from St. Louis, via Stevenson, with heavy cost and constant loss for want of proper storage at Fort Stevenson, and for other reasons. Fort Totten can only be supplied with certainty and economically from Port Abercrombie.

The escorts demanded for the trains from Fort Stevenson exhaust the garrison ; none will be needed from Abercrombie to Totten.

The various buildings designed for the post of Fort Totten may all
be completed another season. They will all be needed, and economy
demands that the post buildings be prosecuted to completion as rapidly

Excellent limestone exists about this post in the form of erratic blocks
it boulders, and it is possible that lime for the neighboring posts can
readily be provided from here. The lime is of excellent quality; good
tay is found for making brick.
No stone is found in place until within about thirty miles of Mouse
Riter

. Here, in a tributary of the Chene, near its head, is an out-crop of sandstone lying in the side hill at an angle of nearly 45°, some forty or fifty yaris long. Limestone in place is reported in the bed of the Otter Tail River, some twenty or thirty miles from Fort Abercrombie. No other rocks in situ hare been observed between that point and the Missouri River, the entire rock formation being buried under a mass of drift

. A well bored at Fort Totten to the depth of 70 feet did not pass entirely through the drift formation. A post at the south bend of Mouse River will be nearly on the direct

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from the foot of the coteau on that road. The crossing of that creek needs repairs.

Civilians authorized : 1 guide and interpreter, at $75 per month; 1 guide, at $35; 1 blacksmith, at $60 per month.

FORT RANSOM.

This post is at the north western apex of the triangle already noticed, and is on the circuitous but wet-season route from Fort Abercrombie to Totten, as it may be said to fank to the west all the intermediate and difficult streams. From Abercrombie to Totten by this road is two hundred miles of good road, Ransom being one hundred and twentysix miles from Totten.

Fort Ransom was established June 18, 1867, and has been constructed within the past two years. Brevet Major General A. H. Terry desig. nated to Brevet Major G. H. Crosman, Tenth United States Infantry, the site for the post, but the latter did not occupy the place indicated by the department commander.

This is an outpost of little importance at present. It is on the Cheyenne, at a noted landmark, (Bears' Den Hillock,) about twenty-five miles distant west froin the direct road from Fort Totten to Fort Abercrombie, and serves partially to cover that road.

Barracks and quarters. There are sufficient quarters for the officers; one block, however, needing a new roof upon one side; quarters for men, &c., sufficient. There is a good hospital, magazine, and storehouse; the latter was in superior order. Some lathing and plastering is required to finish the post. At this post the public laths were used to make chicken yards, and good lumber and pine shingles had been used to cover new houses. There is a steam saw-mill at this post, ex. posed to the weather, except some old canvas was thrown over the engine.

The wood delivered upon contract was good and well piled. The contractor had, however, been put to many inconveniences. He was made to get his wood clear of the reservation, and to graze and herd his stock at a distance from the post. He stated that, in conversation, he was told by the commanding officer that the chief quartermaster had no authority to draw the contract so that vouchers might be given for any part until the whole was delivered, &c. Since my inspection, Mr. Myrick informs me that he (the commanding officer) has ordered his (Myrick's) agent, who is getting wood, off the post. The embarrassments to supplying wood, with an officer who is so difficult to suit, are so great that it is recommended that the wood, from this date, be cut at this post and hauled by the troops. The company has been filled up: there is no other labor required, and it is believed to be for the interest of the service that this course be pursued.

Water is about 1,500 feet distant, and is hanled by the troops. Wood is abundant and convenient, and grazing and hay all that is desired.

Civilians authorized: 1 blacksmith, at $75 per month; 1 guide and interpreter, at $75 per month.

FORT TOTTEN.

This post is on Minni-Wakan Lake, one hundred and twenty-six miles north of Fort Ransom, one hundred and twenty-six miles a little north of east from Fort Stevenson, on the Missouri River, and about seventy miles east of Mouse River. This post is well situated in a tract of rolling country, with convenient wood, water, and grass, and a fair agricultural region near it. A large reservation of Sioux is here located. The post is in process of construction, with a greater degree of permanence than most of the posts in the department.

Barracks and quarters.—The quarters for the officers are to be of brick, plain and comfortable, very well adapted to this severe climate. It is expected that the commanding officer's quarters, and at least quarters for six other officers, will be completed this season, with weather that is tolerably favorable.

Barracks.-Barracks for two companies, of brick, are in a condition so that they may be occupied this season. One of the buildings built under the superintendence of Captain J. V. Furey, assistant quartermaster, last year, does not conform to the plan, the roof being considerably lower, with less pitch than the specification and plans call for. The one built this season under the superintendence of Lieutenant P. M. Thorve, Twenty-second United States Infantry, is much better.

Morehouses.—Two storehouses, one for subsistence stores, and one for quartermaster's stores, were erected last year under the superintendence of Captain Furey. Each one was placed 30 feet from the position called for by the plan, and only one side of each of these buildings, as to openings and doors, conformed to the plan. Upon the outside of each building but one door is placed, and no other opening. These buildings are poorly constructed in some respects. The foundations constructed under the direction of this officer are defective. A careful inspection developed the fact of great improvement thus far under the new contractor. Nothing, however, but constant watchfulness will secure the kind of service due the Government. The old post is, in a measure, unfit for longer occupation. There are many things required to be done, but the garrison is so small in enlisted men present that an excuse was ready for every omission.

Fuel is furnished by contract, hay the same; but grain has heretofore been furnished from St. Louis, via Stevenson, with heavy cost and constant loss for want of proper storage at Fort Stevenson, and for other

reasons,

Fort Totten can only be supplied with certainty and economically from Fort Abercrombie. The escorts demanded for the trains from Fort Stevenson exhaust the garrison ; none will be needed from Abercrombie to Totten.

The various buildings designed for the post of Fort Totten may all be completed another season. They will all be needed, and economy demnadıls that the post buildings be prosecuted to completion as rapidly as possible.

Excellent limestone exists about this post in the form of erratic blocks or bonlders, and it is possible that lime for the neighboring posts can Fradily be provided from here. The lime is of excellent quality; good dat is fonnd for making brick. So stone is found in place until within about thirty miles of Mouse River. Here, in a tributary of the Chene, near its head, is an out-crop of kanilstone lying in the side hill at an angle of nearly 45°, some forty or fifty yards long. Limestone in place is reporteil in the bed of the Otter Tail River, some twenty or thirty miles from Fort Abercrombie. No other rocks in situ hare been observed between that point and the Missouri River, the entire rock formation being buried under a mass of dritt

. A well bored at Fort Totten to the depth of 70 feet did not pass entirely through the drift formation.

A post at the south bend of Mouse River will be nearly on the direct road to Fort Buford from Fort Totten, and will render the military occupation of this country very complete. It can be readily supplied from Fort Totten, distance about one hundred and ten miles. It can be readily communicated with also from Fort Stevenson, within a supposed radius of seventy miles. Such a post will be one hundred and fifty or one hundred and sixty miles from Fort Buford.

This inspection shows that 15 good horses are required at Fort Totten, 12 at Fort Ransom, 12 at Fort Wadsworth, and 12 at Fort Abercrombie There is forage enough for them were they furnished immediately, as they might be by purchase.

When the companies are filled up with recruits the enlisted men can readily supply at all these posts the hay and wood required. The men who are to take charge of the horses and do the scouting ought to be picked or selected for their fitness for this service.

The employment of guides at posts where Indian scouts are stationed is an unnecessary expense, for the Indians, with their interpreter, can go anywhere and answer all the purpose of guides; otherwise their employment loses an element of its value-economy.

At all the posts there was a general want of attention to the interests of the service, and to duty on the part of subalterns doing duty in the quartermaster's department, except at Fort Ransom. In most cases want of experience might be urged; but usually this was associated with indifference or want of fitness.

The posts in this district all require wells except Fort Totten. It would be an excellent thing to plant trees about them for shade purposes, and to test the matter of raising trees. A very little attention would provide trees that would be of considerable protection in winter to break off the storms. For classification of civilian employés, see Special Field Orders No. 38, accompanying this report.

Quantity of hay contracted

for, tons.

Quantity of wood contracted

for, cords.

16

63

53

$0 6.96 0 8.93

$0 1.121

0.35%

$6 72 8 98

1,000,000 1,000,000

24 12

102 48 98 47 107

23

Fort Ellis, Montana Territory.
Fort Shaw, Montana Territory.
Camp Cooke, Montana Territory.
Fort Buford, Dakota Territory.
Fort Steveson, Dakota Territory
Fort Rice, Dakota Territory.
Fort Sully, Dakota Territory
Fort Randall, Dakota Territory.
Fort Abercrombie, Dakota Territory
Fort Wadsworth, Dakota Territory.
Fort Ransom, Dakota Territory
Fort Totten, Dakota Territory.
Fort Ripley, Minnesota
Fort Spelling, Minnesota

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Three, infantry.
Four, cavalry
Three, infantry
One, infantry.
Three, infantry.
Two, infantry
Three, infantry..
Three, infantry.
Two, infantry
Two, infantry
Two, infantry.
Three, infantry.
Four, cavalry.
Two, cavalry
Two, cavalry.

9 40 10 45 5 70

478, 191, 490, 911 145, 615 490, 911

247, 405 51, 170 1,073, 866 74, 601

894, 709 13, 176
474, 036

168, 5.56
832, 884 161, 797
222, 368 39, 931
332, 7041 48, 343
192, 759 765, 396

12
12
12
12
19
+

9
12

965 965 965 441 290 4:27 269 270 145

125 1,000
400 2,000

50
400 3, 000
400 800
400 1,000

1, 600

500
3 0 1,000
200

44 86 31 23 16

53

4
11
14

6 94 4 0

39 33

0 1.90 01. 90

2

17

13

22

10

131, 066

741, 038

359

0 1.90

4 20

100, 1,000

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RECAPITULATION,

Name of posts.

Number of companies, in.

fantry or cavalry.

Number of civilian employés.

Number of extra-duty men.

Number of horses.

Number of mules.

Number of oxen.

Grain on hand, ponnds.

Hay on hand, pounds.

Wood on hand, cords.

Cost of grain last year, per

pound.

Cost of grain this year, J*

pound.

Cost of wood, per cord,

Quantity of grain contracted

for, pounds.

* One blacksmith, at $75.

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