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LETTER

OF

THE SECRETARY OF WAR,

COMMUNICATING,

In further compliance with the resolution of the Senate of December 14, 1870, additional information in regard to the alleged complicity of Hon. William Sprague and others in the so-called Texas adventures.

FEBRUARY 27, 1971.-Referred to the Select Committee on Alleged Traffic with Rebels

in Texas.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

February 27, 1871. The Secretary of War has the honor to submit to the Senate of the United States, in further answer to the resolution of December 14, 1870, attested copies of certain papers supposed to be connected with the al. leged complicity of the Hon. William Sprague and other citizens of Rhode Island, in the so-called Texas Adventure, or unlawful traffic with persons in the insurgent State just named, during the late war.

WILLIAM W. BELKNAP,

Secretary of War.

WAR DEPARTMENT, February 27, 1871. It is hereby certified that the accompanying papers are true copies of original documents now in possession of this Department. Witness my hand and official seal on the date above stated. (SEAL.]

WM. W. BELKNAP,

Secretary of War. .

PROVIDENCE, October 30, 1862. MY DEAR GENERAL: Congratulating you again npon your service to the cause, I bog to introduce to you Mr. Hoyt, the bearer, who came to me with letters from the Presi. dent, and was by me introduced to gentlemen here, who have fitted out a vessel to aid the loyal citizens of Texas and to get information for our authorities.

I cannot doubt but you will render him and his co-laborers every assistance, and which may also be of advantage to you from the information you may obtain. I'deem the object worthy and bespeak for it your kind attentions. With high regard, I am, general, your obedient servant,

WM. SPRAGUE. Major General B. F. BUTLER,

Commanding Department, New Orleans.

PROVIDENCE, October 30, 1862. MY DEAR COMMODORE: I desire to introduce to you Mr. Hoyt, who came to me with letters from the President, and was by me introduced to some of our prominent citizens, who have aided him in the matter as desired by him, viz: Aid to the loyal citizens of Texas, aud information for our military and naval authorities. Considering the object one of great worth, and having urged some of our citizens to aid in the matter, I have to ask of you such attention as you can grant him in furtherance of his plans. Any aid given him will be appreciated by me. I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WM. SPRAGUE. OFFICER COMMANDING GULF SQUADRON,

Gulf of Mexico, &c.

EXECUTIVE MANSION,

Washington, September 17, 1862. Mr. Harris Hoyt, who bears this letter, is recommended to the President as a true and loyal citizen, by unquestionable authority. This letter is given to him at his request, to commend him to the confidence and kind offices of Union people on his way back to his home.

JOHN HAY, Acting Private Secretary to the President.

STATE OF RHODE ISLAND, EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT,

Providence, October 14, 1862. 8ır: Mr. Harris Hoyt, a Union man of Texas, has made a proposition to the Government, as I understand, to go to Texas for the purpose of bringing away a portion of his family, now there, relieving his Union friends, and at the same time getting important information for the benefit of our Goverument. He has letters from the President and others vouching for his good faith. He has proposed to some of our dealers, among whom is Colonel Reynolds, known to the Treasury Department, to put a few goods on board his vessel, which he will exchange with his Union friends for cotton. They desire to procure for Mr. Hoyt a document from the Secretary of the Navy which would enable him to pass our blockading squadron uninterrupted.

It is, of course, important to the Government to get the information which Mr. Hoyt would be able to procure from them; and there can be no objection raised to relieving the Union men of Texas. The importance of getting out cotton when it can be done without giving aid and comfort to the enemy, you are well aware. Every bale we can procure helps to keep down the price of cotton and keeps bread in the mouths of our people-far more advantage to us than the equivalent given for it, and especially if it can be conferred to those who are sympathisers of the Government. I shall esteem any aid you can give Mr. Hoyt an advantage to our whole people, as it will also be to those directly interested. As matters now stand, the benefit of all these operations is confined almost exclusively to foreigners—those interested in arming and breaking up the country.

Again hoping you will aid these parties in this matter, I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WM. SPRAGUE. Hon. GIDEON WELLS,

Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C.

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30 Session.

No. 11.

MESSAGE

OF THE

PRESIDENT OF

OF

THE UNITED STATES,

COMMUNICATING,

In compliance with the resolution of the Senate of the 5th instant, the last correspondence between Mr. Motley, as minister to the Court of St. James, and the Department of State.

JANUARY 9, 1871.- Reat, ordered to lie on the table and be printed.

To the Senate of the United States : I transmit to the Senate, in answer to their resolution of the 5ti ibaiat, a report from the Secretary of State, with accompanying doc

ments,

U. S. GRANT.

WASHINGTON, January 9, 1871.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, January 9, 1871. The Secretary of State, to whom was referred the resolution of the Senate of the 5th instant, requesting the President "to communicate to the Senate, if compatible with the public interests, the last correspond. face between Mr. Motley, as minister to the Court of St. James, and

Department of State, together with such other dispatches or papers tebing the subject matter to which such correspondence relates, indoding all telegraphic dispatches and other communications relating to his recall," has the honor to lay before the President the correspond thit and papers called for by the resolution.

HAMILTON FISH. The PRESIDENT.

List of accompanying papers.

1. Mr. Fish to Mr. Motley, No. 3, May 15, 1869.
2. Mr. Motley to Mr. Fish, No. 8, June 12, 1869.
3. Mr. Fish to Mr. Motley, No. 23, June 28, 1869.
4. Mr. Motley to Mr. Fish, No. 48, July 15, 1869.

5. Mr. Motley to Mr. Fish. No. 19, (private and contidential,) July 17,1369.

6. Mr. Motley to Mr. Fish, No. 65, July 30, 1859.

PROVIDENCE, October 30, 1862. MY DEAR COMMODORE: I desire to introduce to you Mr. Hoyt, who came to me with letters from the President, and was by me introduced to some of our prominent citizens, who have aided him in the matter as desired by him, viz: Aid to the loyal citizens of Texas, and information for our military and naval authorities. Considering the object one of great worth, and having urged some of our citizens to aid in the matter, I have to ask of you such attention as you can grant him in furtherance of his plans. Any aid given him will be appreciated by me. I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WM. SPRAGUE. OFFICER COMMANDING GULF SQUADRON,

Gulf of Mexico, fc.

EXECUTIVE MANSION,

Washington, September 17, 1862. Mr. Harris Hoyt, who bears this letter, is recommended to the President as a true and loyal citizen, by unquestionable anthority. This letter is given to him at his request, to commend him to the confidence and kind offices of Union people on his way back to his home.

JOHN HAY, Acting Private Secretary to the President.

STATE OF RHODE ISLAND, EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT,

Providence, October 14, 1862. Sir: Mr. Harris Hoyt, a Union man of Texas, has made a proposition to the Government, as I understand, to go to Texas for the purpose of bringing away a portion of his family, now there, relieving his Union friends, and at the same time getting important information for the benefit of our Government. He has letters from the President and others vouching for his good faith. He has proposed to some of our dealers, among whom is Colonel Reynolds, known to the Treasury Department, to put a few goods on board his vessel, which he will exchange with his Union friends for cotton. They desire to procure for Mr. Hoyt a document from the Secretary of the Navy which wonld enable him to pass our blockading squadron uninterrupted.

It is, of course, important to the Government to get the information which Mr. Hoyt would be able to procure from them; and there can be no objection raised to relieving the Union men of Texas. The importance of getting out cotton when it can be done without giving aid and comfort to the enemy, you are well aware. Every bale we can procure helps to keep down the price of cotton and keeps bread in the mouths of our people-far more advantage to us than the equivalent given for it, and especially if it can be conferred to those who are sympatbisers of the Government. I shall esteem any aid you can give Mr. Hoyt an advantage to our whole people, as it will also be to those directly interested. As matters now stand, the benefit of all these operations is confined almost exclusively to foreigners—those interested in arming and breaking up the country.

Again hoping you will aid these parties in this matter, I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WM. SPRAGUE, Hon. GIDEON Wells,

Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C.

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