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destitute. I did not, therefore, suppose myself to be transcending the lucidly and carefully-drawn limitations of the instructions in which you explain the President's views on the subject of belligerency when I spoke upon that point.

The significant statements, too, of the British government on the 6th of May, 1861, in regard to the condition which should precede its concession of naval belligerency to the southern rebellion, (the due estab)lishment, namely, of prize courts and regular adjudication of captures, according to international law,) and the utter contempt shown by the rebel cruisers and their English allies for this condition, imposed by her Majesty's government, have always seemed to me points to be kept in clear view whenever any allusion to the great principles in debate between the two countries should be made.

You will pardon me that I venture to make this slight explanation of the considerations which have, perhaps, led me, in official intercourse, somewhat beyond the strict letter of my instructions. I have the honor to be, sir, your obedient servant,

JOIN LOTIROP MOTLEY.

6. Mr. Motley to Mr. Fish.

[Private and confidential.] No.(5.

LEGATION OF THE UNITED STATES,

London, July 30, 1569. (Received August 11, 1869.) Sir: I find that I have inadvertently omitted, until now, to inform you that my dispatch No. 8, of June 12th, containing a minute record of an official interview with Lord Clarendon, was confidentially submitted by me to his lordship, in order that there might be no misunderstanding at any future day as to the accuracy of the report of our conversation.

I accordingly beg now to say that he quite concurred in the fidelity of the statements of the dispatch as sent to you. I have also to add that the dispatch was seen by nobody but Lord Clarendon himself, and that no extract froin it was made. I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOIN LOTIIROP MOTLEY. lion. HAMILTON FISH,

Secretary of State, d., to.

7. Mr. Fish to Mr. Notley.

No. 75.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, October 11, 1869. SIR: When, on the 28th of June last, I answered your No.8, in which Fou gave a lighly interesting account of your interview with Lord Clarfadou, and of the views which you there presented to him as the views entertained by the President upon the subjects of the recognition of the Jate insurgents in the Southern States as belligerents, and the destruction of American commerce by cruisers of British origin carrying the insurgent flag, I was not aware that your statement of the conversation had been submitted to his lordship for his verification.

Your No. 65, of the 30th of July last, first acquainting the Department with that fact, arrived here on the morning of a day on which I was about to leave Washington for a temporary absence, and through inadvertence the fact escaped my notice.

As, without an explanation, lis lordship may naturally be surprised at finding some of the views, purporting to come from the President, which are contained in the written paper submitted by you in June last, inconsistent with the views contained in the paper dated the 25th of September last, which you were instructed to read to him, I must ask you to explain to him that your presentation and treatment of the subject discussed at that interview were, in part, disapproved by me, in my cominunication of the 28th of June last, to which I have already referred. This you may do by reading to him such portion of the instructions contained in my No. 23, of the 28th of June last, as referred thereto, or by stating to him the substance of such part of that note, or by a note containing the substance of that part of my note, at your discretion. I am, sir, your obedient servant,

HAMILTON FISH. J. LOTHROP MOTLEY, Esq., &c., &c., &c., London.

8. Nir. Motley to Mr. Fish.

No. 131.)

LEGATION OF THE UNITED STATES, London, October 28, 1869. (Received November 9, 1969.) SIR: I have had the honor to receive your dispatches Nos. 75 to 79, both inclusive.

I beg to transmit herewith copy of a note addressed by me to Lord Clarendon, on the 231 instant, in reference to the interview of June 10, and to your dispatch, read by me to his lordship, on the 15th instant. And I have the honor to be, sir, your obedient servant,

JOIN LOTIIROP MOTLEY. Hon. HAMILTON FISH,

Secretary of State.

Ur. Motley to Lord Clarendon.

LEGATION OF THE UNITED STATES,

London, October 23, 1869. MY LORD: In reference to the conversatiou which I had with your lordship on the 10th of June last, and to the dispatch from the United States Secretary of State, which I bad the honor to read to you on the 15th instant, it may have possibly appeared that there was some inconsistency between the views of the President upon the subject of the recognition of the late insurgents in the Southern States as belligerents, and the destruction of American commerce by cruisers of British origin, carrying the insurgent fag, as verbally expressed by me at the interview in June, and those views as set forth in the above-mentioned dispatch, I think it necessary to inform your lordship, therefore, that the Secretary of State, on reception of my dispatch recounting the substance of the conversation in June, observed to me, in a dispatch of the 29th of June, that it did not seem that the President's view of the right of every power, when a civil conflict has arisen within another State, to define its own relations and those of its citizens, had been conveyed in precise conformity to that view as the Secretary of State desired to present it to me, and as it doubtless would have been conveyed by me, had my communication been made in writing.

I would therefore request your lordship to consider the dispatch of the United States Secretary of State, which I reiud to you on the 15th mstant, and a copy of which I have had the honor of sending to your lordsliip, as containing the exact and authoritativa statement of the President's views on this subject, as laid down in all the instructions given under his directions by the Secretary of State.

I pray your lordship to accept the assurance of the highest consideration with which I have the honor to be, my loud, your lordship's most obedient servant,

JOHN LOTIROP MOTLEY. The Right Honorable the EARL OF CLARENDON,

SC., $c., fr.

9. Ji. Fish to Ur. llotley.

(Private. ]

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, July 1, 1870. SIR: I am instructed by the President to say that be finds it desirable to make a change in the mission to England, and that he wishes to allow you the opportunity of resigning, in case you feel inclined to do so. With great respect, yours, very truly,

HAMILTON FISH. J. LOTHROP MOTLEY, Esq., dr., d., d., London.

10. Jr. Fish to Mr. Motley.

[Telegram.]

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, July 12, 1870. Am directed to say the President would like an answer by telegrap! o my letter of first instant.

FISHI. MOTLEY,

Minister, London.

1

11. Vr. Motley to Jr. Fish.

[Telegram.--Received July 14, 1870.) I respectfully request you to inform the President that I feel comnelled to decline the offer which he makes in giving me an opportunity of resigning my post, for considerations which are set forth in full in my Letter of today.

MOTLEY,

London. FISH,

State Department, Washington.

12. Mr. Motley to Mr. Fish.

[Private.)

LEGATION OF THE UNITED STATES

July 14, 1870. (Received July 26, 1870.) Sir: I have had the honor to receive your private letters of 1st instant, from which I learn that you are instructed by the President to say that he finds it desirable to make a change in the mission to Eng. land, and that he wishes to allow me the opportunity of resigning in case I feel inclined to do so.

In compliance with the request contained in your telegram of 12th instant, I have replied this day to the above-mentioned letters by a telegram in these words:

“I respectfully request you to inform the President that I feel compelled to decline the offer which he makes in giving me an opportunity of resigning my post, for considerations which are set forth in full in my letter of to-day."

I have now to observe, in further explanation of my course, that as no reasons are given me why I should resign the post to which I was appointed by the President fifteen months ago, with, I believe, the unanimous consent of the Senate; as I myself kuow of none, and as I am not conscious of having ever omitted to carry out, to the best of my ability, the policy and instructions of the President during the period of my mission, I fail to perceive why I should offer my resignation.

Certainly it is not my wish to embarrass an administration which I have always faithfully supported, but I owe something to myself.

Were I now to make use of this permission accorded me to resign, it would seem that I did so in order to avoid a removal which I knew to be just, and to escape a stigma which I felt to be deserved.

As I know the record of my mission, as it stands in the archives of the Department and of this legation, to be free from intentional fault, and as I have therefore no reason to shun the strictest scrutiny, I do not like to have even the appearance of making a contrary admission.

A man is sometimes permitted, as a favor, to resign a post of honor and responsibility, in order to escape examination, censure, or removal; but resignation, under such circunstances, is not a voluntary act, and does not seem to differ essentially from removal.

Such a proceeding on my part would possibly be misinterpreted by many, both at home and abroad, whose opinions I value. With great respect, yours, very truly,

JOHN LOTHROP MOTLEY. Ilon. IIAMILTON FISH,

Secretary of State.

13. Mr. Fish to Mr. Motley.

No. 285.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, November 10, 1870, Sir: Herewith you will receive a letter addressed by the President to her Majesty the Queen announcing your recall. You will accordingly communicate to her Majesty's principal secretary of state for foreign affairs the accompanying copy of the President's letter, and when you shall bave ascertained in what manner it will be most agreeable to her Majesty to receive the original, you will take leave of the British gov. ernment with an expression on the part of the President of his desire to maintain the friendly relations which now so happily subsist between the two countries.

Upon retiring from the mission you will commit the archives and other property of the legation into the hands of Mr. Moran, who will take charge of the same. I am, sir, your obedient servant,

ILAMILTON FISI. Joux LOTIIROP MOTLEY, Esq.

14. 12. Jotley to 11r. Fish.

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[End of mission.]

LEGATION OF THE UNITED STATES,

London, December 7, 1870. (Received Dec. 29.) Referring to my No.525, I have now the honor to state that your No. 285, accompanying a letter addressed by the President to her Majesty the Queen, announcing my recall, was received by me on the ultimo.

I had an interview with the principal secretary of state for foreign affairs on the same day, and verbally communicated to him the fact of my recall. As her Majesty was then in Scotland, but was intending to return very soon to Windsor Castle, it was agreed between Lord Granville and myself that it would be best to deter for a few days my formal note, announcing that I had been intrusted with the above mentioned letter of the President.

Accordingly, on the 29th ultimo, I made a written communication to his lordship, a copy of which is appended.

On the 4th instant I received a notification announcing that her Majesty would receive me on the 6th instant; and, on the same day, a letter from Lord Granville, of which a copy is annexed.

On the 6th instant I bad the honor of taking leave of her Majesty, and of stating, in accordance with your instructions, the desire of the President to maintain the friendly relations which now so happily subsist between the two countries.

l'pon retiring from the mission upon the 7th instant, I committed the archives and other property into the hands of Mr. Moran, who has now charge of the legation.

Having thus closed my brief mission at this court, I think it proper to place on record a statement of the manner in which it has been terminated.

On the 25th of June last I read in the telegraphic intelligence from the United States of a London journal the amouncement, unofficial, but verified by subsequent events, that the President of the United States had signified bis intention of removing me from my post.

It would be impossible for any diplomatic agent to believe himself as more thoroughly possessing the confidence of the government which he had the honor to serve than I supposed myself to enjoy at that moment.

So intimation of a contemplated change had been made to me; no shadow of a difference of opinion existed between the President and bis government and myself, as to our relations with Great Britain or any other power, or as to the general policy of his administration; and I was

S. Ex. 11- -2

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