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volumes, by her yearly fairs, by a large and increasing correspondence, has tried to make better farmers within our borders, and its members believe they have made its works felt for good throughout the state. We have tried to teach the young farmers of Wisconsin that dollars are not all that is worth living and work. ing for; that culture and refinement should be sought after; hence · at our great annual fairs, we have sought to have exhibited, and have shown, not only the finest cavalcade of live stock ever seen on the continent, but we have also exhibited the best and costliest machinery made in the land, as well as paintings, and other works of art. For the exhibition of 1880, a department of education has been added, designed for the exhibition of educational litera. ture, text-books, school furniture, fittings, and all appliances and apparatus for illustration, instruction and training, as well as the specimens of work that have been done by the pupils of our state schools during the past school year.

The farmers of Wisconsin have adopted the creed promulgated by the dwellers in the Canadian peninsular, and which says:

“We believe in small farms and thorough cultivation; we believe that the soil lives to eat, as well as the owner, and ought, therefore, to be well ma. cured; we believe in going to the bottom of things, and, therefore, deep plowing and enough of it, all the better if it be a subsoil plow; we believe in large crops which leave the land better than they found it, making both the farm and the farmer rich at once; we believe every farm should own a good farmer; we believe that the fertilizer of any soil is a spirit of industry, enter. prise and intelligence; without these, lime, gypsum and gliano would be of little use; we believe in good fences, good farm houses, good orchards, and good children enough to gather the fruit; we believe in a clean kitchen, & neat wife in it, a clean cupboard, a clean dairy, and a clean conscience; we believe that to ask a man's advice is not stooping, but of inuch benefit; we believe that to keep a place for everything and everything in its place, saves many a step, and is pretty sure to lead to good tools and to keeping them in order; we believe that kindaess to stock, like good shelter, is saving of fod. der; we believe that it is a good thing to keep an eye on experiments, and note all, good and bad; believe that it is a good rule to sell grain when it is ready; we believe in producing the best butter and cheese, and marketing it when it is ready.”

Much good feeling is expressed at your appointment of ex.Lieutenant Governor Parker to the Board of Regents of the State Uni.

rule, and the enthusiasm kept up to the end of a three days meeting, farmers coming for a distance of fifty miles round about to attend, bringing with them, what is better, their sons and daughters, who, as you will see by the reports herewith submitted, have often taken part in the proceedings. The farmers of the state are under great obligations to Prof. W. W. Daniells, of the State University, for the interest be has taken in these agricultural meetings, and on behalf of all the farmers of the state, I here publicly thank him for his presence, encouragement and counsels.

The growing of fine cattle is an important business in Wisconsip. Export steers as well as cheese, “Wisconsin grown,” are seeking the markets of the old world, and it may truthfully be said that the farmers of Wisconsin have reached the time and laid hold of the principles promulgated by the order of the Patrons of Husbandry, “That they would sell on the hoof and in the fleece, and not from the half bushel.It may be safely said that Wisconsin has passed the period of speculation, heavy loans and ex. orbitant interest, incident to the settlement of a new state, and has entered upon a career of stability and solid permanent growth. Her prairies are all under subjugation, and berealter the additions to our farms must be bewed from the forests of the north. This growth must necessarily be comparatively slow, but it will be substantial and lasting. The born sons of Wisconsin are fast taking the place of the “carpet bagger,” and as the love of country predominates in every heart, so when the soil of our state has passed to the hands of those who are to the manor born, it will be better cultivated, more loved and kinder cared for than it was possible for the pioneers to do. While our state has some grand commercial cities of which our whole people are justly proud, it must not be forgotten that Wisconsin is an agricultural state, and her greatness and glory will depend largely upon the tillers of her soil. It should not be forgotten that a majority of the professional and business men of the country are the sons of farmers, and a wise and liberal policy should be pursued by the state towards this her greatest industry.

The State Agricultural Society, by the dissemination of her

volumes, by her yearly fairs, by a large and increasing correspondence, has tried to make better farmers within our borders, and its members believe they have made its works felt for good throughout the state. We have tried to teach the young farmers of Wisconsin that dollars are not all that is worth living and working for; that culture and refinement should be sought after; hence · at our great annual fairs, we have sought to have exbibited, and have shown, not only the finest cavalcade of live stock ever seen on the continent, but we have also exbibited the best and costliest machinery made in the land, as well as paintings, and other works of art. For the exhibition of 1880, a department of education has been added, designed for the exhibition of educational literature, text-books, school furniture, fittings, and all appliances and apparatus for illustration, instruction and training, as well as the specimens of work that have been done by the pupils of our state schools during the past school year.

The farmers of Wisconsin have adopted the creed promulgated by the dwellers in the Canadian peninsular, and which says:

“We believe in small farms and thorough cultivation; we believe that the soil lives to eat, as well as the owner, and ought, therefore, to be well ma. nured; we believe in going to the bottom of things, and, therefore, deep plowing and enough of it, all the better if it be a subsoil plow; we believe in large crops which leave the land better than they found it, making both the farm and the farmer rich at once; we believe every farm should own a good farmer; we believe that the fertilizer of any soil is a spirit of industry, enter. prise and intelligence; without these, lime, gypsum and guiano would be of little use; we believe in good fences, good farm houses, good orchards, and good children enough to gather the fruit; we believe in a clean kitchen, a neat wife in it, a clean cupboard, a clean dairy, and a clean conscience; we believe that to ask a man's advice is not stooping, but of inuch benefit; we believe that to keep a place for everything and everything in its place, saves many a step, and is pretty sure to lead to good tools and to keeping them in order; we believe that kindaess to stock, like good shelter, is saving of fod. der; we believe that it is a good thing to keep an eye on experiments, and note all, good and bad; we believe that it is a good rule to sell grain when it is ready; we believe in producing the best butter and cheese, and marketing it when it is ready.”

Much good feeling is expressed at your appointment of ex-Lieu. tenant Governor Parker to the Board of Regents of the State Uni

versity; and it is hoped that the chair of agriculture will be sustained by the sons of Wisconsin farmers. Reports of fifty- even local societies were filed in accordance with the statutes.

For the Executive Board,

GEO. E. BRYANT,

Secretary

PROCEEDINGS.

EXECUTIVE BOARD MEETINGS.

In accordance with the requirements of the by-laws of the Wisconsin State Agricultural Society, the executive board met at the agricultural rooms in the capitol, September 8, 1879.

Present, President Fratt, Vice-Presidents Boyce, Warren, Clark, Torrey and C. L. Martin, Treasurer Miner, and Messrs. C. Babbitt, Field, Hazen, Stilson, and Secretary Geo. E. Bryant.

President N. D. Fratt in the chair; who called to order and stated the board was convened for the purpose of acting upon such matters as might be deemed important relative to the annual fair.

On motion, Hon. J. O. Eaton was appointed Superintendent over Swine Department, vice Dore, called home hy sickness and death of his child.

The board met on each evening during the fair, adjusted all matters of difference which arose, giving such directions as were important, and adjourned on Saturday, after auditing and paying the premiums awarded and claims allowed.

DECEMBER MEETING.

STATE AGRICULTURAL ROOMS,

December 2, 1879.

As provided by the by-laws and pursuant to published notice, the executive board met in their rooms in the capitol, December 2, 1879. Quorum present.

President Fratt in the chair, who stated that the meeting was for the purpose of settling with the treasurer, comparing his vouchers with the warrant account of the secretary, and any other general business.

1- W. S. A. S.

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