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more than an average yield of winter wheat in this latitude. As you all know, large quantities of it have been sown in this vicin. ity and in other portions of the state this fall; wbat the result of this winter will be upon it, it is impossible of course to tell at the present time. The winter, of course, has not been a favorable winter for wheat, but I am hoping that there will be something brought out of this that will be of value to the state.

Mr. Field — Do you think this winter has been particularly unfavorable, simply because we have had no snow?

Prof. Daniells - Not so much that as because we have had a number of days when the days bave been warm and the nights cold. Continuous thawing and freezing is what injures wheat.

Mr. Field - Do you think it will do that if the ground is quite wet on top ?

Prof. Daniells - I should not want it very wet on top. If the soil possessed a fair degree of moisture, it probably would do better than if it was wetter or dryer. If the soil is wet, continu. ous freezing will destroy it, also by producing ice on the surface. I think the winter so far has been more than usually unfavorable for wheat, and yet, two weeks ago, as I rode over the country, the winter wheat was looking in fair condition, not as brown as it frequently is at this season of the year, and not by any means killed. I have not examined the plants critically.

Mr. Plumb - I have made a careful examination of several fields and failed to find the least injury.

Prof. Daniells -- Of the Clawson wheat, which is regarded so highly by the farmers of Michigan, and for which they have almost entirely, within the last three years, discarded the old Diehl wheat, which gave such excellent results, we have had a yield during the past year of fiity bushels to the acre. Last year I called your attention to the fact that this wheat did not kill during the winter that the Fultz wheat killed. We have raised it now for four years, with an average yield of 41.8 bushels to the

Its indications are every way favorable. It has not yielded at any time as much as the Fultz wheat, neither has its weight been as great, but it certainly promises well; and inasmuch as it did not kill during the winter of 1875–6, it promises to be a very

acre.

the acre.

bardy variety, more so than the Fultz wheat. I am looking for further indications that these varieties will replace to a very large extent, over especially the timbered portion of the state, the growth of spring wheat. It seems to me that to those who are determined to raise wheat, either one of these varieties will prove more valuable than spring wheat. This is, of course, not proven yet by any means, but the indications are that way. The result must certainly be considered as favorable. We have two varie. ties of winter wheat which have been sent here: the Golden Straw, a Tennessee variety, and the Silver Chaff, a variety from Canada. Neither of them, so far, promise to be of any very great value. However, we are still trying them. The indications so far, as we gather from our experiments, are that the val. uable varieties, if there shall be any really valuable for this climate, will be the Fultz and the Clawson. The yield of the Prussian last year was thirty-eight bushels to

As compared with the others, we do not consider it of any value for cultivation.

A year ago last summer the Michigan millers held a convention, and declared they would not mill the Clawson wheat, and advised farmers not to sow it. The farmers sowed about as much again as they had sowed the previous year. There is no trouble in getting a market for it. The millers do buy it, and do grind it. A few years ago Mr. Delaplaine told me he was buying wheat in Maryland and Virginia, where they raised the Fultz wheat, and the millers complained of this in precisely the same way. I have never known any difficulty in selling it. Mr. N. W. Dean had some near this city last season and sold it for about twenty-five cents per bushel more than the market price. However, he sold it for seed. A gentleman from near Sparta told me it was sought after there with very great readiness; that it was considered a most excellent variety. Practically I know nothing of its milling qual. ities. It is not a hard wheat like the old Diehl, but a much softer wheat. I have no hesitation in saying I do not think that is a point that we need consider at all. I thoroughly believe that if you raise the wheat, and get it of good quality, you never will be troubled in the market.

The experience of the Michigan farmers shows that the complaint of the millers did not in any way affect the market, although they raised about twice as much of this Clawson wheat the year after the millers advised the farmers not to raise it. I think the trouble is imaginary rather than real.

We raised during the last year the same varieties of spring wheat we raised before; and the Red Mammoth, which we have raised for a number of years, again proves to be the best variety. This wbeat has yielded an average of 19.4 bushels to the acre during the eight years that the Fultz has yielded 32.4, a difference of 13 bushels per acre, and during one of those years the winter wheat killed entirely. This is the variety that was most commonly raised in this vicinity eight years ago.

A member — Is it what we used to call the Red Odessa?

Prof. Daniells - It is not what we used to cultivate upon the University Farm as the Odessa. I have never known it under any other name than this. We obtained it of some farmer in this vicinity in 1869 or 1870. We alterwards got some seed from the department of agriculture. The varieties were precisely the same.

A member — Has it any beard at all ?

Prof. Daniells - No, I think not. It ripens about the time of the other wheat. It has a fair sized berry. Last year, the seed we sowed weighed fifty-six pounds per bushel, and the yield we had was fifty-seven pounds per bushel. It does not generally weigh sixty pounds to the bushel. It, however, usually weighs more heavily than the other varieties. The White Michigan wheat yielded, this year, 57.5, but the seed was not as heavy. In Touzelle, one measured bushel weighed only thirty-two pounds. It was injured, as all of the wheat was, by the dry season.

In relation to the barley, I have the same story to tell you that I told last year; that we have raised the same four standard varieties -- the Manshury, Common Scotch, Saxonian and Probstier. The Manshury, for eight years, has averaged 49.3 bushels to the acre, of 48 pounds each. This I consider a very excellent yield. The Chevalier we have raised for dine years, with the exception of the years 1873 and 1875. The yield for the seven years that we have raised it, has been 30.7 bushels per acre.

bardy variety, more so than the Fultz wheat. I am looking for further indications that these varieties will replace to a very large extent, over especially the timbered portion of the state, the growth of spring wheat. It seems to me that to those who are determined to raise wheat, either one of these varieties will prove more valuable than spring wheat. This is, of course, not proven yet by any means, but the indications are that way. The result must certainly be considered as favorable. We bave two varieties of winter wheat which have been sent here: the Golden Straw, a Tennessee variety, and the Silver Chaff, a variety from Canada. Neither of them, so far, promise to be of any very great value. However, we are still trying them. The indica. tions so far, as we gather from our experiments, are that the valuable varieties, if there shall be any really valuable for this climate, will be the Faltz and the Clawson.

The yield of the Prussian last year was thirty-eight bushels to the acre.

As compared with the others, we do not consider it of any value for cultivation.

A year ago last summer the Michigan miller3 held a conven. tion, and declared they would not mill the Clawson wheat, and advised farmers not to sow it. The farmers sowed about as much again as they had sowed the previous year. There is no trouble in getting a market for it. The millers do buy it, and do grind it. A few years ago Mr. Delaplaine told me he was buying wheat in Maryland and Virginia, where they raised the Fultz wheat, and the millers complained of this in precisely the same way. I have never known any difficulty in selling it. Mr. N. W. Dean had some near this city last season and sold it for about twenty-five cents per bushel more than the market price. However, he sold it for seed.

A gentleman from near Sparta told me it was snrobt after there with very great readi" 13; that it was conside excellent variety. Practice ow nothing of ities. It is not a hard

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