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EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT

OF THE

SECRETARY

OF THE

STATE AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY.

To His Excellency, WILLIAM E. SMITH,

Governor of Wisconsin :

Sir:—The acres devoted to the raising of winter wheat by the farmers of the state have been largely added to, the past year, Although the early spring was unfavorable to this beautilul crop, it is believed the harvest will bring joy to those who planted it, and that it will far excel in value the crop of spring wheat. As our berds increase, our acres of grass multiply, and a better system of farming is being pursued in Wisconsin. Sections of wbeat are a thing of the past. Mixed husbandry is universal, and our people are wiser, happier and richer therefor. The most marked increase in acreage is in the crop of tobacco. Our soil and seasons, south of the Wisconsin river, are especially adapted to the growth of this profitable to be raised crop, and when expe. rience shall bave learned us how to properly handle it, it will be come as famous as that heretofore grown in the valley of the Connecticut.

Our annual convention was largely attended. This society sent delegates to five local conventions. These conventions, parented by the state society, are held during the winter months, under the direction of different local societies, and have become very popular and profitable. Crowded houses have been the

EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT

OF THE

SECRETARY

OF THE

STATE AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY.

To His Excellency, WILLIAM E. SMITH,

Governor of Wisconsin :

SIR:— The acres devoted to the raising of winter wheat by the farmers of the state have been largely added to, the past year. Although the early spring was unfavorable to this beautiful crop, it is believed the harvest will bring joy to those who planted it, and that it will far excel in value the crop of spring wheat. As our berds increase, our acres of grass multiply, and a better system of farming is being pursued in Wisconsin. Sections of wbeat are a thing of the past. Mixed husbandry is universal, and our people are wiser, happier and richer therefor. The most marked increase in acreage is in the crop of tobacco. Our soil and seasons, south of the Wisconsin river, are especially adapted to the growth of this profitable to be raised crop, and when experience shall have learned us how to properly handle it, it will be come as famous as that heretofore grown in the valley of the Connecticut

Our annual convention was largely attended. This society sent delegates to five local conventions. These conventions, parented by the state society, are held during the winter months, under the direction of different local societies, and have become very popular and profitable. Crowded houses have been the

rule, and the enthusiasm kept up to the end of a three days meeting, farmers coming for a distance of fifty miles round about to attend, bringing with them, what is better, their sons and daughters, who, as you will see by the reports herewith submitted, have often taken part in the proceedings. The farmers of the state are under great obligations to Prof. W. W. Daniells, of the State University, for the interest he has taken in these agricultural meetings, and on behalf of uil the farmers of the state, I here publicly thank him for his presence, encouragement and counsels.

The growing of fine cattle is an important business in Wisconsip. Export steers as well as cheese, “Wisconsin grown, seeking the markets of the old world, and it may truthfully be said that the farmers of Wisconsin have reached the time and laid hold of the principles promulgated by the order of the Patrons of Husbandry, “That they would sell on the hoof and in the fleece, and not from the half bushel." It may be safely said that Wisconsin has passed the period of speculation, heavy loans and exorbitant interest, incident to the settlement of a new state, and has entered upon a career of stability and solid permanent growth. Her prairies are all under subjugation, and hereafter the additions to our farms must be hewed from the forests of the north. This growth must necessarily be comparatively slow, but it will be substantial and lasting. The born sons of Wisconsin are fast tak . ing the place of the “carpet bagger," and as the love of country predominates in every heart, so when the soil of our state has passed to the hands of those who are to the manor born, it will be better cultivated, more loved and kinder cared for than it was possible for the pioneers to do. While our state has some grand commercial cities of which our whole people are justly proud, it must not be forgotten that Wisconsin is an agricultural state, and her greatness and glory will depend largely upon the tillers of her soil. It should not be forgotten that a majority of the professional and business men of the country are the sons of farmers, and a wise and liberal policy should be pursued by the state towards this her greatest industry.

The State Agricultural Society, by the dissemination of her

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