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lake Winnebago, in Wisconsin, to Rock Island, in Illinois, a distance of 285 miles. It penetrates the most productive and richest agricultural and commercial sections of the west. The largest and most flourishing cities in the state are upon its line. A larger number of people are interested in its construction than in any single line of railroad ever projected in Wisconsin. Its natural aspects are fully discussed in the report of the survey of General Wilson, already referred to, so that those arguments need not be recapitulated in this appeal.

Your memorialists, therefore pray that a donation of lands may be made to the state for the benefit of this great improvementy to be disposed of in such manner and under such re. strictions as the legislature of Wisconsin may direct.

The governor is hereby requested to forward a copy of this memorial to each of our senators and representatives in congress, with the request that they will use all necessary efforts to accomplish its object.

Approved February 14, 1868.

NUMBER 9.

MEMORIAL to the postmaster general for a semi-weekly mail route from the

city of Green Bay to Ahnepee, in Kewaunee county, through the towns of Scott and Green Bay, in Brown county, and through the towns of Red River and Lincolo, in Kewaunee county. Also for the establishment of a postoffice in the town of Lincoln, in said Kewaunee county.

To the honorable the postmaster general of the United States : The memorial of the legislature of the state of Wisconsin represents :

That the interests and convenience of a large number of inhabitants of the counties of Brown and Kewaunee, in said státe, would be greatly benefited by the establishment of a semi-weekly mail route from the city of Green Bay, in said Brown county, through the towns of Scott and Green Bay, of said county, and through the towns of Red River and Lincoln to Abnepee, in said Kewaunee county.

Also respectfully ask the establishment of a postoffice in the town of Lincoln, in said Kewaunee county.

Your memorialists would further respectfully ask, that the said mail route and postoffice be established as aforesaid at the earliest practicable period.

Approved February 14, 1868.

NUMBER 10.

MEMORIAL to congress for an extension of time for the construction and

completion of the military road from Fort Wilkins, Copper Harbor, Kewenaw county, Michigan, to Fort Howard, Green Bay, in the state of Wisconsin,

To the honorable the senate and house of representatives of

the United States :

The memorial of the legislature of the state of Wisconsin respect

fully represents :

That pursuant to an act of the legislature of this state, approved April 4th, 1864, accepting the grant of lands made by an act of the congress of the United States, to aid in the construction of a military road from Fort Wilkins, Copper Harbor, Kewenaw county, Michigan, to Fort Howard, Green Bay, in the state of Wisconsin, approved March 3d, 1863, there has been built seventy miles of said road, between Fort Howard and the Michigan state line, and that the remainder of the road between the last named points is under contract, and is being prosecuted with diligence by a responsible contractor, but that the nature of the work is such that it will be impossible to complete it within the time allowed by the act of congress of March 3d, 1863, which provides that if said road is not completed within five years the lands unsold sball revert to the United states.

Your memorialists do therefore respectfully ask, that in view of the amount already expended upon the work, and of the necessity and importance of the road, not only to the people of Michigan and Wisconsin, but to the country at large, an extension of time be granted to the said states of Wisconsin and Michigan for the completion of said road; and your memorialists do further represent, that two years additional time will in all probability be necessary to ensure the completion of the work in the manner required by congress. They do therefore pray that an act or joint resolution be passed, at an early day, extending the time for the completion of said road to the 3d of March, 1870.

Approved February 19, 1868.

NUMBER 11.

MEMORIAL to congress, in relation to the project of connecting, by navi

gable channels through the Fox and Wisconsin rivers, the waters of the Mississippi with the waters of lake Michigan.

To the honorable the senate and house of representatives of

the United States, in congress assembled : Memorial of the legislature of Wisconsin respectfully represents :

That the project of connecting the Mississippi river and lake Michigan, by navigable channels through the Fox and Wisconsin rivers, has heretofore received the attention of congress.

Its growing importance to the country, the northwest and the state, becomes each year more apparent; and each year, for six successive years, has induced the legislature of Wisconsin to memorialize congress.

The subject of connecting the Mississippi and the lakes, has been considered by the people, met in local, county, state and national conventions; by boards of trade; and by the legislatures and governors of states; and without exception, by resolution, memorial and message, all have united in recognizing its importance and in urging upon congress attention and action in relation thereto. The character of the undertaking is alike apparent to congress, the legislatures and the people. It is rendered necessary as a military measure, to protect, against inroad and attack, a frontier extending from the Atlantic to the Pacific; as a commercial measure, to enlarge the already inadequate outlets for an increasing commerce, thereby lifting from freights, and ultimately from the people, extortionate tariffs; and as a measure, otherwise national, to establish, out of avenues of intercourse and trade, bonds of national unity.

Whatever can be said of the national importance of connecting these waters by any channel, is equally true in reference to this channel. Nature unaided, has, by way of the Fox and Wisconsin rivers, almost effected the desired connection. Aided by a few dams and locks and altogether not to exceed five miles of canal, a channel, having in all but extraordinary stages of low water, a navigable depth of four feet for one third of the way and nearly three feet the remainder, reaching a distance of over one hundred and fifty miles, from Green Bay, upon lake Michigan, to Portage city, upon the Wisconsin, has been opened to regular commerce. Boats of light draft, in

the ordinary stages of water, can now pass from lake Michigan to Portage city, and down the Wisconsin into the Missis. sippi river. Boats of three and four feet draft, have, in stages of high water, repeatedly made the passage. Late in June, 1867, the Brooklyn, a steamboat of three hundred tons burthen, loaded at Green Bay, and, without detention, delivered her cargo at the port of St. Paul.

Estimates of the cost of deepening and completing this channel, have been made under the direction of congress, by Major General G. K. Warren. His report (other than preliminary) has not been made; or if made, has not been seen by your memorialist. But, judging from the present condition of the work, the conformation of the country, the nature of the materials at hand, and the supply of water, your memorialist is constrained to believe that the cost will be comparatively inex. pensive, and may not exceed for a channel of four feet"in low water, one-fourth, or of six feet, two-thirds, or of nine feet, three-fourths of the cost of a like channel in any

other state. The quantity of the water and the size of the locks are greater than in the Erie canal, permitting the passage of flatbottomed and larger boats, so that the depth of four feet in the rivers, is estimated for the purposes of commerce equal to at least six feet in the canal,' an estimate strengthened by the fact that the motive on the canal is horse power, and on the rivers steam.

With the channel extended to the Mississppi and reduced to a uniform low water depth of four feet, commerce will find relief in an outlet with capacity little less than the Erie canal. Estimating the average price per bushel for moving grain by rail from the Mississippi to lake Michigan at twenty-nine cents, and by water not to exceed fourteen cents, and estimating the quantity of grain exported yearly from Minnesota at ten millions of bushels, from Iowa twenty, Wisconsin fifteen, and northern Illinois fifteen, in all sixty millions of bushels, and upon the movement eastward of this, a single crop, the saving will be nine millions of dollars. Add to this the saving upon western freights, and it appears that in a single year a sum will be saved, exceeding four fold the probable cost of the work. It may be said that, coming in competition with railroads, the grain will not go all by water, and therefore the estimate is incorrect. Whether moved by rail or water, the grain must go at approximately water rates.

The navigable waters which it is proposed to improve and develope, and the carrying places between the same, are com. mon highways, declared such by the ordinance of 1787, and

are of the class of navigable waters over which the general government has invariably retained control, and to improve which it has long been its policy to make appropriations.

For these reasons your memorialist respectfully invites the attention of congress to the subject, and while a necessity for economy in the administration of national affairs is apparant, yet in the opinion of your memorialist the pressing importance of an early completion of this work, will justify congress at its present session in undertaking the same. Be it therefore

Resolved by the senate, the assembly concurring, That the gov. ernor be and he is hereby authorized and requested to affix his official signature hereto, and forward a copy of this memorial to the president of the United States, the president of the senate, the speaker of the house of representatives, and to each of our senators and representatives in the congress of the United States.

Approved February 19, 1868.

NUMBER 12.

MEMORIAL to the postmaster general for increase of mail service on mail

route 13,142, from Madison to Sauk.

The memorial of the legislature of the state of Wisconsin would re

spectfully represent:

That the interests and convenience of a large number of the patrons of the several postoffices on mail route 13,142, from Madison to Sauk, would be materially enhanced by an increase of service on said mail route, as follows: One additional mail each way per week. And your memorialists respectfully ask that the same may be immediately established.

Approved February 21, 1868.

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