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STABLE LINEN.

No remarks are necessary under this head, excepting as respects saddle-cases, which should be furnished always for ladies' saddles, as they are liable to be moth-eaten, being stuffed. They should be of linen or brown Holland, like a bag, cut out a little to the shape of the saddle they are to contain.

Harness should always be hung against matting or drugget, instead of against the naked wall; those parts of the harness not in general use, may also be put in bags.

GENERAL OBSERVATIONS ON LINEN.

House linen should be purchased of various patterns, according to the use for which it is intended, and a great difference should be made between kitchen, housemaid's and pantry linen, so that they may not easily be mixed, for servants frequently forget to look at the marks, and the tea-cloths should be easily distinguishable from the glass or china cloths. House linen should be marked very clearly and fully for this purpose; ink is better than silk: it is well to mark all pantry things P, kitchen K, house H, and stable S, but the use should be more fully marked, thus “P china cloth,” or “K duster,” is not at all more than is useful. Plate 21, Fig. 5, is a drawing of a very convenient linen press, being a kind of bin or chest, to contain dirty linen, placed between two cupboards, three feet wide and twenty inches deep, and from six to seven feet high. The doors of these cupboards may be in two parts, if preferred to one, so that the pantry linen may be divided from the kitchen on the one side, and the housemaid's from the bed-room on the other; the stable-linen and any that is old may be put in the two drawers under the cupboards; the apparent drawers under the bin are false. The bin is four feet and a half long, twenty inches deep, and three feet high; it should have two lids on hinges, and a division inside down the centre, so that wearing apparel may be kept separate from the house linen; over the bin is a shelf, on which may be kept clothes-baskets, &c., and beneath the shelf, lists of the linen may be hung; an inkstand and washing books might also stand there. The cupboards should have moveable shelves, with slides all down the sides. It is an excellent plan to paste on the edges of these shelves, tickets of card-board, on which are written the name and number of the article upon the shelf. Thus, a ticket with “best sheets, 6 pair,” is placed on the edge of the shelf on which they lie; perhaps, “best pillow-cases, 12 pair,” will be side by side with the sheets, the ticket belonging to them will therefore be on the edge of the same shelf. This

arrangement is useful both to mistress and servant, particularly when a change takes place in the household. Fig. 6.

House linen should be counted over once a year at least.

A card containing a list of articles, together with the number and the mark, should be fastened within the cupboard, together with another list containing the quantity of linen allowed per week for the laundress, and the price to be paid the washerwoman for each article.

A linen-press should be kept in the most perfect order.

REMARKS.

In purchasing house-linen, it is a good plan to buy it in the piece, whether wanted at the time or not; by this means, you have always plenty of new linen by you, which being cut up, may be made by the servants when there is any spare time, they should also be marked, so that when a towel or any thing wants replacing, it can be done immediately, and it does not appear nearly so great a tax on the purse when several things are wanted at once; much time is thus saved, and when things are bought in the piece they are charged less.

Shirt fronts, collars, and wristbands, children's shifts, shirts and pinafores, with several other articles might also be cut out in the same manner, so that there is a constant supply of new linen ready-made when wanted. This plan, of course, only answers with large families where children of all sizes are to be fitted.

Very convenient washing books may be printed for families who pay for their washing by the piece, with the prices affixed, of which the following is a specimen.

It is the best economy to wash by the year, or by the quarter, in places where it can be done, and by the score or dozen in preference to the piece. A calculation may easily be made so as to be quite fair both to the washerwoman and her employer.

COUNTRY PRICES.
NURSERY WASHING BOOK.

Betty Powell, For JMrs. Wilson. Date. Date. March 1st. March 1st. Number Number. Price. £. 3. d. d. 8 8 Aprons ........................... + 4 2 2 Bands............ -- - + 1 5 5 Caps ............................................. I 5 7 7 Night .......... -------------------------- ł 3} Flannel ............................ - - - - - - - - + Cloaks............. -------- ----------------------- - 3 Frills ........................ • * - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - ---- 1 : Frocks ........................... --------------- 2 co, Gowns, Night ........... ------------- --------- 2 3. Flannel ................... - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 2 - Dressing 3 Handkerchiefs - -- + — Neck......... ---------- - - - - - - - - # Long Infant's Robes ....................... ---- 3 — Petticoats ................. ---- 2 Day Flannels .......... - - - - - 2 - Night Flannels............... 2 : Day Gowns ............. ----- 2 — Night Gowns............ ------ 2 Napkins ..................... -------- • * * * * * * - - - - -- + Petticoats ........................... --- l Flannel ...... ----- 2 - Pinafores .................... ---- % : Saccarines ....................................... 2 3. Stockings, pairs of ........................... I : Socks, pairs of ..................... - - - - - - - - - - - - # ... Shifts ........... - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - --------- - - - - - - - - - 1 coo Shirts ..... -------------- -------- ----------- ------- # % Shawls ................ - - - - - - - - - - ----------- - - - - - l Flannel .......... - - - - - - - - - * - - - - - -------- 1 coxo Spencers ....................................... 1 : Tippet and Sleeves ...... - - - - - - - - - - - - - - ------- 1 | 3. Trowsers ,-- * * * * * * * * * * * * * * - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 2

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Number. Number.

Number. Number.

i :

Leglets ............... ---------------------------
Waistcoats ....... - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - --------------
Cradle Covers....................................
Sheets....................................
Blankets......

Coverlets ......

Pillow Cases...........................
Towels ..........................................
Pincushion Covers..............................
Pieces of lace ....... ----------------------- ------
Mending................................... -------

LADY'S WASHING BOOK.

Aprons ...... ------------ ------------------------
Caps, Bonnet ....................................

Night........... --------- ---------------- ---
Collars ............. .... - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -------
Dresses .............. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - ------
Dressing Gowns........................... ------
Flannel ditto ....... ------- ----------------- -----
Drawers ....... - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Flannel Petticoats..............................

Flannel Drawers ........................... --
Flannel Waistcoats ...........................
Frills ...................... -----------------------
Habit Shirts ...... ------------------------------
Jackets .......... ------------------------------ --
Night Gowns............................. -------
Neck Handkerchiefs......................... --
Pocket ditto ......... ------------ ------------- --
Napkins ........ - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -------- --
Pockets ...... - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - --
Petticoats ................................. ------
Socks, pairs of .............................. ---
Stockings, pairs of............................. -
Shifts ............................................ -
Stays ...

Skirts ..........

Shawls ..................... ------------------- --
Tippets ....... ---------------------------------- -

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Number. Number. Price. £. 3. d.
3. Nightcaps ...................... -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - ! |
: Nightshirts .......... - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - ------ 2
o Neck-handkerchiefs ........................... l
3. Pocket ditto .................................... +
*- Socks, pairs of .......................... ------- 1
3. Stockings, pairs of ............... - - - - - - - - - - - - I
o Shirts ......... - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 3
: Shirt Collars .................................... 1
3. Waistcoats.......................... ------- ------ 1%
Under Waistcoats.............................. 1 |
HOUSE LINEN WASHING BOOK.
Number. Number. Price. £. s. d.
roo Bed Furniture ........... ---------------------- 2s. 6d.
Blankets, per pair.............................. 8d. or 1s.
o Counterpanes............. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - ls.
... Chair-covers ........... ------------------------- #d.
... Dusters and Cloths ........................... #d.
o Doyleys........................................... 4d.
o Jack or Roller Towels ........................ ld.
:2 Kitchen Cloths ........................... ------ #d.
.. Napkins ...... - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -------------------- #d.
3. Pillow Cases ........... ------ - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - #d.
o Sheets, pairs of ................. ---------------- 2d. or 4d.
coa Sofa Covers ........................ ------------ 3d.
. Table Cloths ................... ----------------- 2d. or 4d.
Ž Towels .......* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * ---------- #
3. Window Curtains .................. - - - - - - - - - --- 2

CHAPTER VIII.

ON UPHOLSTERY.

As some knowledge of upholstery is of importance to the head of every establishment, a few general observations relating to the fitting up of beds, windows, and other articles of furniture requiring much drapery; also, blinds, carpets, &c., may be advantageously inserted in this work; as, in families of limited income, it is a great saving to make up the above mentioned articles at home.

The Author has only introduced those patterns which, from their simplicity, may always be used, without being decidedly in or out of fashion. It is strongly recommended to those who can afford the expense, to employ an experienced upholsterer, as the patterns will not only be more in fashion, but more tastefully and regularly put up, than they could possibly be by any one unaccustomed to the business.

Great accuracy is necessary for the graceful arrangement of drapery.

BEDSTEADS.

PLATE 22.

There are various shaped bedsteads, and consequently numerous modes of fitting them up, the most simple of which will be explained in their proper order.

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