Obrázky stránek
PDF

which is secured to the pole of the screen. The bottom of this silk is hemmed neatly and has a deep fringe set on. The silk should be a good deal fulled, when on the rod, to look handsome. Others are made by plaiting or fluting rich silk in straight lines, Fig. 22, or to radiate from the centre, which is confined within a frame of rose-wood or mahogany. Large folding screens are made for putting near to doors, to prevent draughts of air, and are useful to place near a warm bath, especially for infants or delicate persons, so as to enable them to dress free from cold air: small screens of two folds are very convenient to place by every washing stand, when two persons occupy the same room. The frames, after being made by a carpenter, should be finished up at home. They are usually covered with canvass, Holland, calimanco, chintz, twill, or other material. Black Holland looks very neat. These screens make very good scrap books for children, by being pasted over with riddles, prints, caricatures, &c., &c.

[merged small][ocr errors][merged small]

This is made of Holland, calico, or thick cambric, or glazed muslin, and sometimes trimmed all round with a frill, or piped with coloured calico. It is intended to contain the night-gown, cap, also the dressing-gown, and perhaps a change of linen, and the tidy or dressing-case, and may be made to any size, according to the number of things it is intended to contain.

Its chief use is in travelling, especially in a large family, when the separate case, containing each individual's night things are easily found together, and as easily put up in a large carpet bag. Each bag should bear either the name or the initials of the person to whom it belongs.

A TRAVELLING DRESSING-CASE OR TIDY.
PLATE 24. FIG. 3.

These are most useful things, and no one who has once used them will travel without them, unless they can conveniently carry a dressing-case with them.

They are made of Russia duck, ticking, or stamped cloth, or any other firm material.

In making up, the greatest exactness is required to make the parts fit truly. The back, which is all in one piece, is lined with strong calico, and the various pockets are then laid on, the bottom of one being sewed a little below where the top of the next will come, so that the whole has a neat appearance: the sizes of the pockets, given in the Plate, allow for this wrapping over. The top of each pocket is bound with purple or other coloured galloon, and the divisions for the smaller ones are formed by stitching a piece of narrow galloon neatly down upon them. The whole is then bound round with galloon, and strings of the same colour fastened to the pointed end, so as to tie round the dressing-case when it is full. As purple galloon will wash well, it is best for this purpose, as most other colours fade. On each pocket is written with marking ink, the name of the article to be contained in it; these of course differ according to the fancy of the owner, but the most usual are curl papers in the triangular pocket at the top, H for hair-pins, W for thread, tapes, buttons, &c., S for soap, P for tooth-powder,

[ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]

T for tooth-brush, which ought also to be enclosed in an oil silk bag; C for comb, and B for hair brush.

GLOVE CASE.

PLATE 24. FIG. 4.

Gloves easily become soiled, if not covered carefully, and as white gloves, coloured, and black should be kept in separate cases, it is better to make bags for the express purpose of keeping them nicely. It is also advantageous to buy several pairs at once, as they are cheaper when sold by the dozen or half dozen. For ladies' gloves, take a strip of the material, about four nails wide, and five nails and a quarter long, and pipe or bind it all round with coloured glazed calico, or ribbon; cut another strip, one nail and three quarters wide, and nine nails long, this is also piped and bound ; the ends may be finished according to fancy, either left square, rounded off, or turned down to form a triangle. Crease both strips in half their length, and lay the middle of the first strip cross-wise upon the middle of the other, so that the longest piece lies underneath, after pinning them very evenly together, stitch them firmly with small stitches in the piping, so as not to be seen. Strings, or a button and button-hole are fixed to the ends of the longest strip. White gloves may be put between the two strips and the coloured ones above, when they are laid in, fold the side of the smallest piece over first, then the long one, and button it together. On the outside mark the name, and the colour of the gloves. Gentlemen's glove cases vary only in being larger.

POCKET HANDKERCHIEF CASE, COMMONLY CALLED PORTE MOUCHOIR.
PLATE 24. FIG. 5.

This is usually made of silk, and is lined with muslin or sarsenet, having perfume between the silk and the lining, and when put in ladies drawers, with the handkerchiefs laid in, gives them an agreeable scent. It consists either of one or two pockets, generally the latter, so that in folding up, the case is merely doubled over. The case is about four nails wide, and if intended for double pockets, nine nails and a half long, each pocket being full four nails, and allowing half a nail for turnings in, and a nail space between them, cut out the lining, and two pieces of fine muslin the same size, and lay them as follows:— First the silk, next one piece of muslin, then sprinkle the scent freely all over it, after which place the other piece of muslin, and then the lining, pin them evenly, and run them round at the edges. Quilt it or not, according to pleasure. The quilting keeps the scent in place; the ends are turned up the two nails on each side, and the whole is bound with ribbon. Sometimes the initials of the owner are marked on the outside. For a

suitable perfume, see Receipt, No. 14.

SHOE OR BRUSH AND COMB BAG.
PLATE 24. FIG. 6.

These are very convenient in travelling, as they save much paper, and take up little room, they are

made of different materials, according to the shoe to be put in. If for walking shoes, a coarse brown

canvass called earn, is the most suitable. For house shoes, calico or Holland, and for satin slippers,

old silk. The bags are made to draw up at one end in the usual way, and should be just wide enough

to contain the shoes, but as they are useful to put in one's muff, or to carry in the hand when going out to dine or spend the day, it is as well to leave sufficient space at the top for a pair of stockings above the shoe. The name of the owner, and the quality of the shoe, should be put outside.

ANOTHER SHOE BAG.

PLATE 24. FIG. 15.

This is a better shape for large shoes or ladies' boots, as they lie flatter when packed in separate pockets. The bag is therefore back-stitched up the middle, and a button put on for the upper flap to button upon.

A MAT.
PLATE 24. FIG. 7.

These are very useful to put on handsome tables, or to use as kettle holders. They are made with wool, which forms a fringe similar to that on a rug. Procure a piece of coarse flannel, the size wanted for the mat, which must be hemmed or herring-boned down to make it firm at the edges. Choose a mesh of the width required for the depth of the fringe, and then after fastening the wool at one of the outer corners, commence working by carrying the wool round the mesh and fastening the loop thus made by a cross-stitch to the flannel. Observe always to work along the thread, to keep it straight, and make the fringe lie very much thicker at the corners. Continue working, never fastening off, letting the second square be about four or five threads from the outer one, and connected at the corners to the outer square by fringe added diagonally. This makes the corners full and handsome. When the fringe is all sewed on, fasten off, and then proceed to cut the fringe neatly all round, and with the scissors spread it out, or comb it, to make it look rich and full. Afterwards procure some stiff muslin or buckram and tack it behind, and then sew on neatly the silk or glazed calico lining, and the mat is complete.

BOOT BAGS.

PLATE 24 FIG. 8.

These are very useful for gentlemen whose boots take much room when wrapped in paper, which

they often burst, and soil the clean linen; a boot when packed is generally rolled up from the top about half the leg, the bag should be made to fit it when thus rolled, and is on an average, about the following size:—

The width at the top of the case, about three nails.

The width at the bottom, about five nails.

The length of the case when doubled, about four nails in front, sloped down at the top to

three nails and a quarter.

NURSERY BAG.

This is used by nurses while travelling, and is very convenient for the purpose of carrying infants' soiled linen. The bag should be of dark coloured silk, or washing material, made in two divisions, and lined throughout with oiled silk, or Indian rubber cloth, so as to be waterproof. They should be six nails wide, and five or six nails deep. The oil silk bag should be made to draw out of the silk or outer bag. The one pocket or division holds the soiled linen, and the other pocket contains a damp sponge.

« PředchozíPokračovat »